Burkina Faso
 
 
Burkina Faso is a landlocked country in west Africa. It is surrounded by six countries: Mali to the north, Niger to the east, Benin to the southeast, Togo and Ghana to the south, and Côte d'Ivoire to the southwest. The country's capital is Ouagadougou. Its size is 274,200 square kilometres (105,900 sq mi). Formerly called the Republic of Upper Volta, it was renamed on 4 August 1984, by President Thomas Sankara, to mean "the land of upright people" in Mòoré and Dioula, the major native languages of the country. Figuratively, "Burkina" may be translated, "men of integrity", from the Mòoré language, and "Faso" means "father's house" in Dioula. The inhabitants of Burkina Faso are known as Burkinabè.

Burkina Faso Motto: Unité-Progrès-Justice (French); translation: Unity-Progress-Justice.

Burkina Faso was populated between 14,000 and 5000 BC by hunter-gatherers in the country's northwestern region. Farm settlements appeared between 3600 and 2600 BC. This region has traditionally been dominated by the Mossi people, who seem to have migrated into the area from what is now northern Ghana, and established a number of elaborate and aggressive kingdoms, principal among them Wagadugu (Ouagadougou), which remains the national capital. The Mossi still predominate to this day; they comprise about 48% of the population. Fulani at about 10% and Mande are at about 6.5%.

 
Territorial Disputes: In Sep 2007, Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) intervened to attempt to resolve the dispute over two villages (Koualou village) along the Benin-Burkina Faso border that remain from 2005 ICJ decision; in recent years citizens and rogue security forces rob and harass local populations on both sides of the poorly-defined Burkina Faso-Niger border; despite the presence of over 9,000 UN forces (UNOCI) in Cote d'Ivoire since 2004, ethnic conflict continues to spread into neighboring states who can no longer send their migrant workers to work in Ivorian cocoa plantations.
 
 
GURMA (Nungu)
  • A Mossi Kingdom in eastern Burkina Faso, and premier among the Gurma Mossi cluster of states. The capital is Fada N'Gurma, situated 130 miles (209 km.) east of the modern capital at Ouagadougou. This state was established by the Gurmanche people, a tribe with close affinities to the Mossi.
  • GURMANCHE
  • Diaba Lompo.............................................1204 - 1248 '
  • Tidarpo.................................................1248 - 1292
  • Untani..................................................1292 - 1336
  • Banydoba................................................1336 - 1380
  • Labi Diebo..............................................1380 - 1395
  • Tenin...................................................1395 - c. 1425
  • Tokurma..............................................c. 1425 - c. 1470
  • Gima.................................................c. 1470 - c. 1520
  • Gori.................................................c. 1520 - c. 1553
  • Bogora...............................................c. 1553 - 1571
  • Kampadiboaghi...........................................1571 - 1615
  • Kampadi.................................................1615 - c. 1659
  • Tantiari.............................................c. 1659 - 1684
  • Lissoangui..............................................1684 - 1709
  • BURICIMBA
  • Yendabri................................................1709 - 1736
  • Yembirima...............................................1736 - 1791
  • Baghamma................................................1791 - 1822
  • Yenhamma................................................1822 - 1831
  • Yencirima...............................................1831 - 1843
  • Yencabri................................................1843 - 1846
  • Yempaabu................................................1846 - 1850
  • Taja...........................................................1850
  • Yempadigu (Yaabinparigu)................................1850 - 1880
  • Yenkoari................................................1880 - 1892
  • Yentugri.......................................................1892
  • Batchande (Bancandi)....................................1892 - 1911
  • France................................................1890's - 1960
    • Simandari (Kambambori).............................1911 - 1952
    • vacant
    • Hamicuuri (Hamtiuri)........................01 Jan 1954 - 26 Nov 1961
    • vacant
  • Upper Volta (Burkina Faso after 1984)...................1960 - date
    • Yenmiama...........................................1973 - 1975
    • Yentangu....................................30 May 1975 - date
 
GWIRIKO
  • A Dyula state associated with the Watara "Empire", located in western Burkina Faso, within the bend in in the Black Volta River. Gwiriko state was fiunded in 1714.
  • WATARA (WATTARA)
  • Famaghan I..............................................1714 - 1729
  • Famagan was a brother of Shehu Umar of Kong.
  • Famaghan II dan Tyeba...................................1729 - 1742
  • Kere Massa..............................................1742 - 1749
  • Magan Wule..............................................1749 - 1809
  • Dramani........................................................1809
  • Dyori...................................................1809 - 1839
  • Bako Moru...............................................1839 - 1851
  • Laganfyela Moru.........................................1851 - 1854
  • Ali Dyan................................................1854 - 1878
  • Kokoroko Dyan...........................................1878 - 1885
  • Sabana..................................................1885 - 1892
  • The Mandingo Empire of Samory...........................1891 - 1898
    • Tyeba Nyandane.....................................1892 - 1897
    • Pintyeba...........................................1897 - 1909
  • France..................................................1898 - 1960
    • Karamoko...........................................1909 - 1915
  • Upper Volta (Burkina Faso after 1984)...................1960 - date
 
OUAGADOUGOU (Wagadugu)
  • A city in central Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), and the modern capital of that state, of old the center of a Mossi kingdom in early modern times.
  • Nedega..............................................c. 1235 - c. 1253
  • Riale...............................................c. 1253 - c. 1273
  • Widiraogo...........................................c. 1273 - c. 1293
  • Zungwarana..........................................c. 1293 - c. 1313
  • Ubri................................................c. 1313 - c. 1320
  • Sorba...............................................c. 1320 - c. 1335
  • Nassikimde..........................................c. 1335 - c. 1350
  • Kundumi.............................................c. 1350 - c. 1380
  • Kuda................................................c. 1380 - c. 1400
  • Dawoema.............................................c. 1400 - c. 1425
  • Zettemusma..........................................c. 1425 - c. 1450
  • Niandeffo...........................................c. 1450 - c. 1475
  • Nattia.........................................     c. 1475 - c. 1500
  • Namoero.............................................c. 1500 - c. 1520
  • Kida................................................c. 1520 - c. 1540
  • Kimba...............................................c. 1540 - c. 1560
  • Kobra...............................................c. 1560 - c. 1580
  • Sana................................................c. 1580 - c. 1600
  • Wiliga..............................................c. 1600 - c. 1620
  • Ubia................................................c. 1620 - c. 1640
  • Mottaba.............................................c. 1640 - c. 1660
  • Warga...............................................c. 1660 - c. 1680
  • Zombere.............................................c. 1680 - c. 1700
  • Kom I...............................................c. 1700 - c. 1720
  • Sagha I.............................................c. 1720 - c. 1740
  • Bulugu..............................................c. 1740 - c. 1760
  • Savadoro............................................c. 1760 - c. 1780
  • Karfo...............................................c. 1780 - c. 1800
  • Baoro...............................................c. 1800 - c. 1830
  • Kutu................................................c. 1830 - c. 1850
  • Sanom...............................................c. 1850 - 1890
  • Bukari Kutu............................................1890 - 1896
  • Mazi...................................................1896 - 1897
  • France.................................................1897 - 1960
    • Kuka..............................................1897 - 1906
    • Kom II............................................1906 - 1942
    • Sagha II..........................................1942 - 1957
    • Kugi Naba.........................................1957 - 1960 d. 1971
  • Upper Volta (Burkina Faso after 1984)..................1960 - date
 
YATENGA
  • A Mossi kingdom in northern Burkina Faso, with it's center at the town of Ouahigouya, located some 30 miles (48 km.) southeast of the Mali border and 96 miles (154 km.) northwest of the national capital at Ouagadougou.
  • Kingdom of Zandana (Rawatenga, or Gitti)
  • Rawa
  • Kingdom of Yatenga (established in 1333)
  • Yadega
  • Yolomfaogoma
  • Kourita
  • Geda
  • unknown ruler
  • Niago
  • Parima
  • Kumpaugum
  • Nabassere
  • Tusuru
  • Sini
  • Piiyo I.................................................. ? - 1754
  • Kango.........................................................1754 d. 1787
  • Wabgho.................................................1754 - 1757
  • Kango (restored).......................................1757 - 1787
  • Saaga..................................................1787 - 1803
  • Kaongo.................................................1803 - 1806
  • Tuguri.................................................1806 - 1822
  • Koom I.................................................1822 - 1825
  • Korogo........................................................1825
  • Ragongo................................................1825 - 1831
  • Wobgo II......................................................1831
  • Nyambe Moogo...........................................1831 - 1834
  • Totebaldbo.............................................1834 - 1850
  • Yemde..................................................1850 - 1877
  • Sanum..................................................1877 - 1879
  • Woboga.................................................1879 - 1884
  • Piiyo II...............................................1884 - 1885
  • Baongo.................................................1885 - 1895
  • Bulli..............................................Jun 1895 - 27 Jan 1899
  • Sidiyete Wedraogo (rebel)..........................Nov 1895 - Dec 1896
  • France.................................................1897 - 1960
    • Ligidi.....................................04 Feb 1899 - 12 Feb 1902
    • Kobga......................................28 Feb 1902 - 02 Sep 1914
    • Tigre.............................................1914 - 1954
    • Sigiri............................................1954 - 04 May 1960
    • Koom II.......................................May 1960 - 1975
  • Upper Volta (Burkina Faso after 1984)..................1960 - date
    • Gigma.............................................1975 - 1978
    • Koom III..........................................1978 - date
 
 
               20 Feb 1895  French protectorate of Haute-Volta (Upper Volta).
               18 Oct 1904  Part of Haut-Sénégal-Niger (under Mali).
               01 Mar 1919  French colony of Haute Volta (Upper Volta)
                             (part of French West Africa; under Senegal).
               01 Jan 1933  Partitioned between French Sudan, Ivory Coast and Niger.
 01 Jan 1938 - 29 Jul 1940  Upper Ivory Coast (part of Ivory Coast).
 16 Jun 1940 - Nov 1942     Administration loyal to Vichy France (from Nov 1942, Free
                             French).
               04 Jan 1947  French territory of Haute-Volta (Upper Volta).
               11 Dec 1958  Autonomy (Republic of Upper Volta [République de Haute-Volta];
                             also in official use to 1959: Voltaic Republic [République
                             Voltaïque]).
               05 Aug 1960  Independence from France (Republic of Upper Volta).
               04 Aug 1984  Name changed to Burkina Faso.
 
  • France..........................................20 Feb 1895 - 05 Aug 1960
  • After a decade of intense rivalry and competition between the British and the French, waged through treaty-making expeditions under military or civilian explorers, the Mossi kingdom of Ouagadougou was defeated by French colonial forces and became a French protectorate in 1896. The eastern region and the western region, where a standoff against the forces of the powerful ruler Samori Ture complicated the situation, came under French occupation in 1897. By 1898, the majority of the territory corresponding to Burkina Faso today was nominally conquered; however, control of many parts remained uncertain. The French and British convention of 14 June 1898 ended the scramble between the two colonial powers and drew the borders between the countries' colonies. On the French side, a war of conquest against local communities and political powers continued for about five years. In 1904, the largely pacified territories of the Volta basin were integrated into the Upper Senegal and Niger colony of French West Africa as part of the reorganization of the French West African colonial empire. The colony had its capital in Bamako.
  • High Commissioner
  • Max Guillaume Berthet...........................11 Dec 1958 - Feb 1959
  • He also served as the acting Governor from 15 Jul 1958 to 11 Dec 1958.
  • Paul Jean Marie Masson.............................Feb 1959 - 05 Aug 1960
    • Vice President of the Government Council
    • Daniel Ouézzin Coulibaly...................18 May 1957 - 26 Jul 1958
    • Presidents of the Government Council
    • Daniel Ouézzin Coulibaly (continued).......18 May 1957 - 26 Jul 1958
    • Nawalagmba Maurice Yaméogo.................07 Sep 1958 - 11 Dec 1958
    • Acting till 21 Oct 1958.
  • Presidents
  • Nawalagmba Maurice Yaméogo (continue)...........11 Dec 1958 - 04 Jan 1966
  • On 11 December 1958, it achieved self-government and became the Republic of Upper Volta and a member of the Franco-African Community. A revision in the organization of French Overseas Territories began with the passage of the Basic Law (Loi Cadre) of 23 July 1956. This act was followed by reorganizational measures approved by the French parliament early in 1957 to ensure a large degree of self-government for individual territories. Upper Volta became an autonomous republic in the French community on 11 December 1958. Full independence from France was received in 1960. The name Upper Volta indicated that the country is situated on the upper reaches of the Volta River. The river's three tributaries are called the Black Volta, White Volta and Red Volta, and the colors of the national flag corresponded to these parts of the river system. The first president, Maurice Yaméogo, was the leader of the Voltaic Democratic Union (UDV). The 1960 constitution provided for election by universal suffrage of a president and a national assembly for five-year terms. Soon after coming to power, Yaméogo banned all political parties other than the UDV. The government lasted until 1966 when after much unrest mass demonstrations and strikes by students, labor unions, and civil servants the military intervened.
  • Aboubakar Sangoulé Lamizana......................04 Jan 1966 - 25 Nov 1980
  • The military coup deposed Yaméogo, suspended the constitution, dissolved the National Assembly, and placed Lt. Col. Sangoulé Lamizana at the head of a government of senior army officers. The army remained in power for four years, and on 14 June 1970, the Voltans ratified a new constitution that established a four-year transition period toward complete civilian rule. Lamizana remained in power throughout the 1970s as president of military or mixed civil-military governments. After conflict over the 1970 constitution, a new constitution was written and approved in 1977, and Lamizana was reelected by open elections in 1978. Lamizana's government faced problems with the country's traditionally powerful trade unions, and on 25 November 1980, Col. Saye Zerbo overthrew President Lamizana in a bloodless coup. Colonel Zerbo established the Military Committee of Recovery for National Progress as the supreme governmental authority, thus eradicating the 1977 constitution.
  • Presidents of Military Committee of Recovery for National Progress
  • Saye Zerbo.......................................25 Nov 1980 - 07 Nov 1982
  • Colonel Zerbo also encountered resistance from trade unions and was overthrown two years later, on 07 November 1982, by Maj. Dr. Jean-Baptiste Ouédraogo and the Council of Popular Salvation (CSP). The CSP continued to ban political parties and organizations, yet promised a transition to civilian rule and a new constitution.
  • Chairman Provisional Committee of Popular Salvation
  • Jean-Baptiste Ouédraogo..........................08 Nov 1982 - 26 Nov 1982
  • provisional to 11 Nov 1982.
  • Head of State
  • Jean-Baptiste Ouédraogo (continued)..............26 Nov 1982 - 04 Aug 1983
  • Chairman National Revolutionary Council and Head of State
  • Thomas Isidore Noël Sankara......................04 Aug 1983 - 15 Oct 1987
  • After the coup, Sankara formed the National Council for the Revolution (CNR), with himself as president. Sankara also established Committees for the Defense of the Revolution (CDRs) to "mobilize the masses" and implement the CNR's revolutionary programs. The CNR, whose exact membership remained secret until the end, contained two small intellectual Marxist-Leninist groups. Sankara, Compaore, Capt. Henri Zongo, and Maj. Jean-Baptiste Lingani—all leftist military officers—dominated the regime. On 04 August 1984, as a final result of President Sankara's zealous activities, the country's name was eventually changed from Upper Volta to Burkina Faso, which translates to "land of honest people".
  • President of Popular Front
  • Blaise Compaoré..................................15 Oct 1987 - 31 Oct 1987
  • On 15 October 1987 Sankara was killed by an armed gang with twelve other officials in a coup d'état organized by his former colleague, Blaise Compaoré. Deterioration in relations with neighboring countries was one of the reasons given, with Compaore stating that Sankara jeopardized foreign relations with former colonial power France and neighboring Ivory Coast. Prince Johnson, a former Liberian warlord allied to Charles Taylor, told Liberia's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) that it was engineered by Charles Taylor. After the coup and although Sankara was known to be dead, some CDRs mounted an armed resistance to the army for several days. Compaoré immediately reversed the nationalizations, overturned nearly all of Sankara's policies, returned the country back under the IMF fold, and ultimately spurned most of Sankara's legacy.
  • President of Popular Front and Head of State
  • Blaise Compaoré (continued)......................31 Oct 1987 - 24 Dec 1991
  • The constitution of 02 June 1991 established a semi-presidential government with a parliament which can be dissolved by the President of the Republic, who is elected for a term of seven years.
  • President
  • Blaise Compaoré (continued)......................24 Dec 1991 - 31 Oct 2014
  • The Burkinabé uprising was a series of demonstrations and riots in Burkina Faso in October 2014 that quickly spread to multiple cities. They began in response to attempts at changing the constitution to allow President Blaise Compaoré to run again and extend his 27 years in office. Following a tumultuous day on 30 October, which included the involvement of former Defence Minister Kouamé Lougué and the burning of the National Assembly and other government buildings as well as the ruling Congress for Democracy and Progress party's headquarters, Compaoré dissolved the government and declared a state of emergency before eventually fleeing to Ivory Coast with the support of President Alassane Ouattara. General Honoré Nabéré Traoré announced that a transitional government would run the country until an election within 12 months. After another day of mass protests and initially refusing to resign, after mounting domestic pressure Compaoré resigned from his 27-year presidency on 31 October and Traoré took over as the interim head of state.
  • Head of State
  • General Honoré Nabéré Traoré.....................31 Oct 2014 - 01 Nov 2014
  • Since the resignation of Blaise Compaoré in the aftermath of the 2014 Burkinabé uprising, Traoré has stated that a new election will take place in 60–90 days. However, on 01 November 2014, the Military of Burkina Faso declared Zida to be the head of state of Burkina Faso in a statement signed by army chiefs including Traoré himself.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Yacouba Isaac Zida............01 Nov 2014 - 18 Nov 2014
  • President
  • Michel Kafando (transitional)....................18 Nov 2014 - 16 Sep 2015
  • He appointed Lieutenant Colonel Isaac Zida, who had briefly served as interim head of state before him, as Prime Minister on 19 November 2014. President Michel Kafando and Prime Minister Isaac Zida are arrested in a coup by members of the Regiment of Presidential Security Guard on 16th Sep 2015. On 17th September, General Gilbert Diendéré is named as head of a National Council of Democracy. After an army intervention on 21st September, the power is transferred back to Kafando on 23rd September.
  • Chairman of the National Council for Democracy
  • Gilbert Diendéré..................................17 Sep 2015 - 23 Sep 2015
  • He was a long-time aide to President Blaise Compaore, serving as commander of the Regiment of Presidential Security (RSP) during Compaore's rule. Members of the RSP launched a coup on 16 September 2015, detaining President Michel Kafando and Prime Minister Isaac Zida. On 17 September, Diendéré was appointed as Chairman of the National Council for Democracy, the new military junta.
  • President
  • Michel Kafando (transitional)....................23 Sep 2015 - 29 Dec 2015
  • Roch Marc Christian Kaboré.......................29 Dec 2015 - date
  • Previously he served as Prime Minister of Burkina Faso from 22nd March 1994 to 06th Feb 1996 and President of the National Assembly of Burkina Faso from 2002 to 2012. He also served as President of the Congress for Democracy and Progress (CDP). In January 2014, he left the ruling CDP and founded a new opposition party, the People's Movement for Progress. He was elected as President of Burkina Faso in the November 2015 general election, winning a majority in the first round of voting. Upon taking office, he became the first non-interim president in 49 years with no past ties to the military.
 
Currency:
The West African CFA Franc (ISO 4217 code: XOF) is the currency of eight independent states spanning over 1,350,000 square miles (3,500,000 km2) in West Africa: Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Niger, Sénégal and Togo. The acroynym CFA stands for Communauté financière d'Afrique ("Financial Community of Africa"). The currency is issued by the BCEAO (Banque Centrale des États de l'Afrique de l'Ouest, "Central Bank of the West African States"), located in Dakar, Senegal, for the members of the UEMOA (Union Économique et Monétaire Ouest Africaine, "West African Economic and Monetary Union"). The Franc is nominally subdivided into 100 centimes but no centime denominations have been issued.
The CFA franc, in general is a currency used in fourteen countries: twelve formerly French-ruled African countries, as well as in Guinea-Bissau (a former Portuguese colony) and in Equatorial Guinea (a former Spanish colony). The ISO currency codes are XAF for the Central African CFA franc and XOF for the West African CFA franc. It has a fixed exchange rate to the euro: 100 CFA francs = 1 French (nouveau) franc = 0.152449 euro; or 1 euro = 655.957 CFA francs. Although Central African CFA francs and West African CFA francs have the same monetary value against other currencies, West African CFA coins and banknotes are not accepted in countries using Central African CFA francs and vice versa.
Despite Burkina Faso using West CFA Francs in general daily transactions, it has not produced commemorative coins either as Upper Volta or Burkina Faso until 1990 when some medallic issue were produced by a private firm and later in 2003 by Africa Mint as shown below.
 
1990 - Burkina Faso Numismatic Agency issues
 

1 ounce troy. Year: ND (1990). Weight: 31.57g. Metal: 0.999 Silver. Diameter: 39.25 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: N/A. Obverse: "ESSAI 25 de 30" in center. Reverse: Coats of Arm with "BURKINA FASO" written below. Mintage: 30. Minted Years: One year type.

Note: "ESSAI  25 de 30 (Pattern issue 25 of 30). It has Thomas Sankara's (1983-1987) Burkinabé revolution Coats of Arm, an emblem featuring a crossed mattock and AK-47 with the motto La Patrie ou la Mort, nous vaincrons ("Fatherland or death, we will win"'). The new Coats of Arm was adopted in 1997.

Despite from both, below resources, the above coin is still not listed or published. In fact it is pattern of pattern issue.

Published in Sweden, Atalaya is an English-language cinderella stamp magazine that has been produced by Christer Brunstrom since the early 1980s. From 1990-99 the magazine also featured a series of articles about coins from unrecognized states and related entities. According to Atalaya#38 published in 1994 about Burkina Faso issue: Formerly known as Upper Volta, in 1990 the Republic of Burkina faso was planning a celebration for the 30th anniversary of its independence and among various projects was a commemorative legal tender coin. A very small quantity of the pattern of this commemorative coin was issued mainly for presentation, among others, to member of the government but, for some unknown reasons, the project was cancelled. The reverse of the pattern reproduces the official coats of arm of the Republic of Burkina Faso with the motto "La patrie ou la mort, nous vaincrons" ("The fatherland or death, we will win"). The obverse depicts two eagles heads meaning solidarity of the Burkinabè people with the inscription "Once 1 Troy" and the year of the issue "1990". It was minted in pure silver with a mintage of 300 pieces and in pure copper with a mintage of 30 pieces. Both versions are in high relief, in Proof quality. It is of special interest to note that this issue of pattern is very first numismatic issue of the Republic of Burkina as the legal tender coins that circulates in the country are those of the Union Monétaire Ouest-Africaine (West African Monetary Union) of which it is a member.

In the early 1990's the Burkina Faso Numismatic Agency was formed to strike bullion coins for Burkina Faso, which had never issued its own coins. It uses the coins of the West African States. The coins feature an attractive high relief portrait of the heads of two eagles on one side and the Burkina Faso coat-of-arms that was used until 1997. The arms feature a crossed AK-47 and a mattock, with the motto "La Patrie ou la Mort, nous vaincrons" ("Fatherland or death, we will win"). The 38.5mm coins were denominated as 1 Troy ounce and are dated 1990. Some of these Burkina Faso dated 1990 coins are also listed in Unusual World coins book published by Krause Publication as Medallic Bullion Coinage - Republic of Burkina Faso issued by "Burkina Faso Numismatic Agency", listed as follow:

  • X#1 Ounce 1990. Weight: 31.10g. 0.999 silver. Diameter: 38.50 mm. Obverse: Burkina faso Arms. Reverse: Eagle's larger head on top facing left and eagle's head below is smaller and facing right. Mintage: 300 pieces.
  • X#1a Ounce 1990. Weight: 31.10g. 0.999 gold. Diameter: 38.50 mm. Obverse: Burkina faso Arms. Reverse: Eagle's larger head on top facing left and eagle's head below is smaller and facing right. Mintage: 30 pieces.
  • X#1b Ounce 1990. Weight: 31.10g. Copper. Diameter: 38.50 mm. Obverse: Burkina faso Arms. Reverse: Eagle's larger head on top facing left and eagle's head below is smaller and facing right. Mintage: 30 pieces.

Two different pattern presentation sets, each of which contains four coins. Only 10 of each set were made, which were distributed to government and mint officials. Some of the coins were distributed as individual pieces rather than as sets, making the sets even scarcer than the mintage would indicate. Except for a few examples of the the copper coin in each set, the coins were not sold to collectors.

  • One set features the the coins struck in copper (BrX5b, with a mintage of 30 pieces), nickel-silver and bronze and brass (unlisted, mintage of 10 each).
  • The other set are uniface (one side is completely blank) patterns that only have the obverse, which features the Burkina Faso coat-of-arms. The set includes uniface patterns struck in copper (mintage of 30 pieces), nickel-silver and bronze and brass (mintage of 10 each). These uniface patterns are not listed in the Unusual World Coins book.
 
2003 IDAO - Bureau Africain d'Emission issues
 

KM#1 6000 CFA Francs or 4 Africa. Year: 2003. Weight: 10.16g [10.00g]. Metal: Brass outer ring, CuNi inside ring. Diameter: 28.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Africa Mint. Obverse: "AFRIQUE DE L'OUEST * 2003 * 6000 CFA *  EMISSION BURKINABE *" (clockwise). Rhinoceros & Buffalo Bird Keeper. "IF" initials of the engraver below the animals. Reverse: "· IDAO · EMISSION MONETAIRE DE L'INSTITUT DE DEVELOPPEMENT DE L'AFRIQUE DE L'OUEST" (clockwise). Elephant face on West African Map (in center). Value "4 AFRICA" written below the map. Mintage: 1,200. Minted Years: One year type.
Note: The following coins are produced by Africa Mint in 2003 only.
  • KM#1 6000 CFA 2003. Bimetal (CuNi center and Brass ring). Rhinoceros & Buffalo Bird Keeper. Mintage: 1,200 pieces. (as shown above)
  • KM#1a 6000 CFA 2003. 0.999 silver. Rhinoceros & Buffalo Bird Keeper. Mintage: 5 pieces.
  • KM#1b 6000 CFA 2003. Bimetal (Pure Silver center & 24 carats Gold plated ring) Rhinoceros & Buffalo Bird Keeper. Mintage: 5 pieces.
     
  • KM#2 6000 CFA 2003. 0.999 silver. Rhinoceros & Buffalo Bird Keeper & President. Mintage: 5 pieces.
  • KM#2b 6000 CFA 2003. Bimetal (Pure Silver center & 24 carats Gold plated ring) Rhinoceros & Buffalo Bird Keeper & President. Mintage: 5 pieces.
 
2007
A essai/pattern issue of 2500 Francs in silver were produced in silver. Mintage: 850. Diameter: 27.30 mm. Weight: 7.7750 grams. Subject: Abolition of Slavery movement with William Wilburforce protrait on it.
 
2013
 

1000 CFA Francs. Year: 2013. Weight: 31.10g. Metal: 0.999 Silver; Antique finish. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: N/A. Obverse: "LE CROCODILE SACRÉ" (The Holy Crocodile) written at the top. Crocodile head with open mouth in the center. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "REPUBLIQUE DU BURKINA FASO" written at the top. Burkina Faso emblem in the center. Value "1000 FRANCS CFA" written at the bottom. Mintage: 2,000. Minted Years: One year type.

 
 
 
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