Eritrea
 
 
This country lies east of Yemen separated by Red Sea. Capital: Asmara (formerly Asmera). [old capital: Massawa 1890-1935].
 
               1557         Massawa (Habesh) part of Ottoman Empire.
    Dec 1813 - 1826         Occupied by Egypt (both nominally part of Ottoman Empire).
               1826         Direct Ottoman rule restored (1826-1848 Na'ibs of Arkiko
                             largely independent), Red Sea province.
        1865 - Dec 1882     Egyptian rule (nominally part of Ottoman Empire), as Red Sea
                             province (or Massawa); Sennaheit annexed in 1873, later part
                             of Red Sea province.
               15 Nov 1869  Port of Assab purchased by the Italian Società di Navigazione
                             Rubattino company.
        1879 - 1890         Asmara under Ethiopian rule.
               05 Jul 1882  Port of Assab is taken over by the Italian government.
               06 Feb 1885  Port of Massawa is taken over by Italy; expansion into the
                             hinterland follows.
               09 Dec 1888  Italian Assab Protectorate (Assab, Massawa and the Danakil
                             hinterland).
               01 Jan 1890  Italian colony (Eritrea).
               01 Jun 1936  Part of Italian East Africa (province of Eritrea, formed by
                             the merger of the colony and the Ethiopian region of Tigre.
                  Feb 1941  British occupation.
               19 May 1941  Italian administration ends.
               19 Feb 1951  United Nations supervision, under British rule.
               15 Sep 1952  Federated with Ethiopia under the sovereignty of the Ethiopian
                             crown (Eritrean Autonomous State).
               14 Nov 1962  Integral part of Ethiopia; Autonomy revoked.
                             Eritrea province of Ethiopia.
               29 May 1991  Provisional government established (de facto independence).
               24 May 1993  Independence (State of Eritrea).
 

 
 
  • Ancient city-states, including Sembel, Mai Chiot, Ona Gudo, Mai Temenai, Weki Duba, and Mai Hutsa c. 800-350 BCE and...
  • Kingdom of D'MT - YG'D Dynasty. Names appear as such because written inscriptions do not include vowels.
  • W'rn Hywt......................................................fl. c. 700 BCE
  • Rd'm
  • Shr'n Rbh
  • Shr'n Lmn
  • Unknown Rulers
  • Axum..............................................c. 500 BCE - 700 CE
  • Beja tribes (central & northern Eritrea)..............c. 700 - c. 1400 and...
  • Harar (in the south).................................c. 1200 - c. 1400's and...
  • Sennar (in the west)...............................c. 1300's - c. 1500's and...
  • BAHR-NEGASH of Midir Bahr. A Christian kingdom loosely aligned with Abyssinia.
  • Unknown Rulers
  • Yeshaq..................................................1557 - 1578 opposed by...
  • Massawa and environs to the Ottoman Empire..............1557 - 1865
    • Wali (governors) of Massawa
    • Musa, Na'ib of Arkiko............................1680's - c.1710
    • Mehmed Pasha......................................... ? - 1694
    • Abaza Mustafa Pasha.................................. ? - c. 1694
    • Misirli Mehmed Pasha................................. ? - c. 1695
    • Gümrükçü Siyavus Pasha..........................c. 1695 - ?
    • Süleyman Pasha ?
    • Ahmad, Na'ib of Arkiko....................................fl. c. 1793
    • Unknown Ruler
    • Na'ibs of Arkiko. Though nominally vassals of the Ottoman Empire, the Na'ibs of Arkiko were de facto independent rulers of most of Eritrea from 1826-1848.
    • Idris Uthman, Na'ib of Arkiko...............fl. c. 1805 - 1826
    • Unknown Ruler 1826-1832.
  • Turkci Bilmaz (in rebellion)............................1832 - 1833
    • Yahya............................................1830's - 1844
    • Hasan..............................................1844 - 1845
    • Muhammad...........................................1845 - 1846
    • Ismail Hakki Pasha.................................1846 - 1848
    • Ottoman Walis of Massawa
    • Unknown Ruler 1848-1861.
    • Muhammad Rasih Bey.................................1861 - 1863 d. 1883
  • Egypt...................................................1865 - 1890
  • Egyptian Walis of Massawa
    • Hasan Bey Rifat....................................1866 - 1867
    • Ali Muntaz Pasha (Abd el-kader)....................1867 - c. 1870
    • Aladdin Pasha Siddiq............................c. 1870 - 1871 d. 1882
    • Johann Alber Werner (Munzinger Pasha)..............1871 - 1874 d. 1875
    • Arakil Bey Nubar...................................1874 - 1875
    • Mohammed Ratib Pasha...............................1875 - 1876
    • Osman Rifqi (Utham Rifki)..........................1876 - 1877
    • Ala'el-Din Pasha Siddiq............................1877 - 1882
    • Franz Hassen Bey (Wali of Sennaheit)...............1877 - 1879
    • Charles Rigolet (Wali of Sennaheit)................1879 - ?
    • Hursid Bey Pertev..................................1882 - Dec 1882
    • Muhammad Muhtar Pasha..............................1883 - 1884 d. 1897
    • Mason Bey.................................................1884
    • Izzet Bey..........................................1884 - 1885
    • Chermside (acting for Izzat Bey)...................1884 - 1885
  • Asmara under Ethiopian rule.............................1879 - 1890
  • Italy.................................................1880's - 19 May 1941
  • Port of Assab is taken over by the Italian government on 05 Jul 1882 and Port of Massawa on 06 Feb 1885. Italian Assab Protectorate was created on 09 Dec 1888 that included Assab, Massawa and the Danakil hinterland.
  • Savoia dynasty of Italy (title: King)
  • Vittorio Emanuele II (Eritrea from 1880's).......17 Mar 1861 - 09 Jan 1878
  • Umberto I........................................09 Jan 1878 - 29 Jul 1900
  • Vittorio Emanuele III (Italy to 09 May 1946).....29 Jul 1900 - 19 May 1941
  • Great Britain.......................................Feb 1941 - 15 Sep 1952
  • Ethiopia.........................................15 Sep 1952 - 24 May 1993
  • Secretary-general of the Provisional Government
  • Isaias Afwerki...................................29 May 1991 - 24 May 1993
  • State of Eritrea (title: President)
  • Isaias Afwerki (continued).......................24 May 1993 - date
 
Currency: 100 Centesimi = 1 Lira; 5 Lire = 1 Riyal = 1 Tallero (1890-1896).
Italian Eritrea was the first colony of the Kingdom of Italy. It was created in 1890 (but the first Italian settlements were done in 1882 around Assab) and lasted officially until 1947. The Eritrean Tallero was the currency of Eritrea between 1890 and 1921. The Italian Kingdom issued new coinage for their colony of Eritrea in 1890 with a silver Tallero d'Italia, patterned after the Maria Theresa thaler together with 50 centesimi, 1, 2 and 5 lire coins. Lire was subdivided into 100 centesimi based on the Latin Monetary Union standards. The issue of a crown sized tallero d'Italia was an attempt to replace the Maria Theresia thaler which circulated extensively from Arabia to Ethiopia. The natives refused to accept the new coinage, even when the Maria Theresia thaler was prohibited.
 

Pagani 632 / Gig. 3 / KM#3 2 Lire (2/5 Riyal). Year: 1890. Weight: 9.94g [10.00g]. Metal: 0.835 Silver. Diameter: 27.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Rome. Obverse: Crowned and uniformed bust of Umberto I in the center facing right. "UMBERTO I RE D`ITALIA . 1890" written on the top part. Engraver name "SPERANZA" in very small alphabets at the bottom.
Reverse: "COLONIA ERITREA" written on above part. Illuminated star above value "L.2" and bi-lingual Ethiopian: "ONE BIRR FACTIONS" in the center and Arabic: "4/10 OF RIYAL"  inscription below it. Wreath and mint initial "R" at the bottom. Mintage: 1,000,000. Minted Years: 1890 and 1896. Engraver: Filippo Speranza, Chief Engraver at Rome Mint.
About the ruler: Umberto I or Humbert I (Italian: Umberto Ranieri Carlo Emanuele Giovanni Maria Ferdinando Eugenio di Savoia, English: Humbert Ranier Charles Emmanuel John Mary Ferdinand Eugene of Savoy; 14 March 1844 – 29 July 1900), nicknamed the Good (in Italian il Buono), was the King of Italy from 09 January 1878 until his death. He was deeply loathed in far-left circles, especially among anarchists, because of his conservatism and support of the Bava-Beccaris massacre in Milan. He was killed by anarchist Gaetano Bresci two years after the incident. The son of Vittorio Emanuele II and Archduchess Maria Adelaide of Austria, Umberto was born in Turin, which was then capital of the kingdom of Sardinia, on 14 March 1844. His education was entrusted to, amongst others, Massimo Taparelli, marquis d'Azeglio and Pasquale Stanislao Mancini. From March 1858 he had a military career in the Sardinian army, beginning with the rank of captain. Umberto took part in the Italian Wars of Independence: he was present at the battle of Solferino in 1859, and in 1866 commanded the XVI Division at the Villafranca battle that followed the Italian defeat at Custoza. On 21 April 1868 Umberto married his first cousin, Margherita Teresa Giovanna, Princess of Savoy. Their only son was Victor Emmanuel, prince of Naples; later Victor Emmanuel III of Italy. Ascending the throne on the death of his father (9 January 1878), Umberto adopted the title "Umberto I of Italy" rather than "Umberto IV" (of Savoy), and consented that the remains of his father should be interred at Rome in the Pantheon, rather than the royal mausoleum of Basilica of Superga. While on a tour of the kingdom, accompanied by Premier Benedetto Cairoli, he was attacked by an anarchist, Giovanni Passannante, during a parade in Naples on 17 November 1878. The King warded off the blow with his sabre, but Cairoli, in attempting to defend him, was severely wounded in the thigh. The would-be assassin was condemned to death, even though the law only allowed the death penalty if the King was killed. The King commuted the sentence to one of penal servitude for life, which was served in conditions in a cell only 1.4 meters high, without sanitation and with 18 kilograms of chains. Passanante would later die in a psychiatric institution, after torture had driven him insane. The incident upset the health of Queen Margherita for several years. In foreign policy Umberto I approved the Triple Alliance with Austria-Hungary and Germany, repeatedly visiting Vienna and Berlin. Many in Italy, however, viewed with hostility an alliance with their former Austrian enemies, who were still occupying areas claimed by Italy. Umberto was also favorably disposed towards the policy of colonial expansion inaugurated in 1885 by the occupation of Massawa in Eritrea. Italy expanded into Somalia in the 1880s as well. Umberto I was suspected of aspiring to a vast empire in north-east Africa, a suspicion which tended somewhat to diminish his popularity after the disastrous Battle of Adowa in Ethiopia on 01 March 1896. In the summer of 1900, Italian forces were part of the Eight-Nation Alliance which participated in the Boxer Rebellion in Imperial China. Through the Boxer Protocol, signed after Umberto's death, the Kingdom of Italy gained a concession territory in Tientsin. The reign of Umberto I was a time of social upheaval, though it was later claimed to have been a tranquil belle époque. Social tensions mounted as a consequence of the relatively recent occupation of the kingdom of the two Sicilies, the spread of socialist ideas, public hostility to the colonialist plans of the various governments, especially Crispi's, and the numerous crackdowns on civil liberties. The protesters included the young Benito Mussolini, then a member of the socialist party. During the colonial wars in Africa, large demonstrations over the rising price of bread were held in Italy and on 7 May 1898 the city of Milan was put under military control by General Fiorenzo Bava-Beccaris, who ordered the use of cannon on the demonstrators; as a result, about 100 people were killed according to the authorities (some claim the death toll was about 350); about a thousand were wounded. King Umberto sent a telegram to congratulate Bava-Beccaris on the restoration of order and later decorated him with the medal of Great Official of Savoy Military Order, greatly outraging a large part of the public opinion. To a certain extent his popularity was enhanced by the firmness of his attitude towards the Vatican, as exemplified in his telegram declaring Rome "untouchable" (20 September 1886), and affirming the permanence of the Italian possession of the "Eternal City". Umberto I was attacked again, by an unemployed ironsmith, Pietro Acciarito, who tried to stab him near Rome on 22 April 1897. Finally, he was murdered with four revolver shots by the Italo-American anarchist Gaetano Bresci in Monza, on the evening of 29 July 1900. Bresci claimed he wanted to avenge the people killed during the Bava-Beccaris massacre. He was buried in the Pantheon in Rome, by the side of his father Victor Emmanuel II, on 09 August 1900. He was the last Savoy to be buried there, as his son and successor Victor Emmanuel III died in exile. A newspaper report of Bresci's attack was carried and frequently read by the American anarchist Leon Czolgosz; Czolgosz used the assassination of Umberto I as his inspiration to murder U. S. President William McKinley in September, 1901 under the banner of Anarchism.
 
 
Eritrea and Ethiopia agreed to abide by 2002 Ethiopia-Eritrea Boundary Commission's (EEBC) delimitation decision but, neither party responded to the revised line detailed in the Nov 2006 EEBC Demarcation Statement; UN Peacekeeping Mission to Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE), which has monitored the 25-km-wide Temporary Security Zone in Eritrea since 2000, is extended for six months in 2007 despite Eritrean restrictions on its operations and reduced force of 17,000 and the mission was ended on 31 Jul 2008 with a UNSC resolution adopted on 30 Jul 2008. Peacekeepers had been driven from the border zone by Eritrea by Feb 2008, and Ethiopia had refused to accept a binding International Court of Justice ruling on the border issue. Sudan accuses Eritrea of supporting eastern Sudanese rebel groups.
 
 
Currency: Dollar. Probably pegged to the US Dollar. Pobjoy Mint produced various Eritrean coin with Dollar denominations in 1993-1997.
 
1993
 

KM#10 1 Dollar. Year: 1993. Weight: 28.24g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Pobjoy Mint. Obverse: Dhow, camel and palm tree, date below, all within center circle. "ERITREA" written in English on the top, in Ethiopian at bottom left and in Arabic at bottom right separately by three stars. Reverse: "PRESERVE PLANET EARTH" written at above part. Triceratops in the center with "TRICERATOPS" written on the left lower side. Denomination "$1" written at the bottom. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: Preserve Planet Earth.

Note: This coin is also produced as KM#11 in silver with same specifications and weight, but $10 as denomination (Mintage: estimated 30,000) and KM#12 in 0.9999 Gold 6.22g as $100 (Mintage: estimated 5,000).

KM#14 1 Dollar. Year: 1993. Weight: 28.26g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Pobjoy Mint. Obverse: Dhow, camel and palm tree, date below, all within center circle. "ERITREA" written in English on the top, in Ethiopian at bottom left and in Arabic at bottom right separately by three stars. Reverse: "PRESERVE PLANET EARTH" written at above part. Pteranodons in the center with "PTERANODON" written on the left lower side. Denomination "$1" written at the bottom. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: Preserve Planet Earth.

Note: This coin is also produced as KM#25 in silver with same specifications and weight, but $10 as denomination (Mintage: estimated 30,000) and KM#27 in 0.9999 Gold 6.22g as $100 (Mintage: estimated 5,000).  Other coins produced in 1993:

  • KM#6 $1 "Independence Day - 24th May 1993". Copper-Nickel. 28.28g. Diameter: 38.61 mm.
  • KM#7 $10 "Independence Day - 24th May 1993". Silver. 31.103g. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Mintage: 30,000 (estimated).
  • KM#8 $50 "Independence Day - 24th May 1993". 0.999 Gold. 3.11g. Mintage: 20,000 (estimated).
  • KM#9 $100 "Independence Day - 24th May 1993". 0.999 Gold. 6.22g. Mintage: 5,000 (estimated).
  • KM#13 $1 Preserve Planet Earth "Ankylosaurus". Copper-Nickel. 28.28g. Diameter: 38.61 mm.
  • KM#24 $10 Preserve Planet Earth "Ankylosaurus". Silver. 28.28g. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Mintage: 30,000 (estimated).
  • KM#26 $100 Preserve Planet Earth "Ankylosaurus". 0.999 Gold. 6.22g. Mintage: 5,000 (estimated).
 
1994
 

KM#15 1 Dollar. Year: 1994. Weight: 28.52g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Pobjoy Mint. Obverse: Dhow, camel and palm tree, date below, all within center circle. "ERITREA" written in English on the top, in Ethiopian at bottom left and in Arabic at bottom right separately by three stars. Reverse: "PRESERVE PLANET EARTH" written at above part. Cheetah in the center. Denomination "$1" written at the bottom. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: Preserve Planet Earth.

Note: This coin is also produced as KM#18 in silver with same specifications and weight, but $10 as denomination (Mintage: estimated 30,000) and KM#21 in 0.9999 Gold 6.22g as $100 (Mintage: estimated 5,000).

KM#16 1 Dollar. Year: 1994. Weight: 28.49g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Pobjoy Mint. Obverse: Dhow, camel and palm tree, date below, all within center circle. "ERITREA" written in English on the top, in Ethiopian at bottom left and in Arabic at bottom right separately by three stars. Reverse: "PRESERVE PLANET EARTH" written at above part. Black Rhinoceros head facing right in the center. Denomination "$1" written at the bottom. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: Preserve Planet Earth.

Note: This coin is also produced as KM#19 in silver with same specifications and weight, but $10 as denomination (Mintage: estimated 30,000) and KM#22 in 0.9999 Gold 6.22g as $100 (Mintage: estimated 5,000).

KM#17 1 Dollar. Year: 1994. Weight: 28.57g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Pobjoy Mint. Obverse: Dhow, camel and palm tree, date below, all within center circle. "ERITREA" written in English on the top, in Ethiopian at bottom left and in Arabic at bottom right separately by three stars. Reverse: "PRESERVE PLANET EARTH" written at above part. Black and White Colobus Monkey sitting on a branch in the center. Denomination "$1" written at the bottom. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: Preserve Planet Earth.

Note: This coin is also produced as KM#20 in silver with same specifications and weight, but $10 as denomination (Mintage: estimated 30,000) and KM#23 in 0.9999 Gold 6.22g as $100 (Mintage: estimated 5,000).

 
1995
 

KM#28 1 Dollar. Year: 1994. Weight: 28.58g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Pobjoy Mint. Obverse: Dhow, camel and palm tree, date below, all within center circle. "ERITREA" written in English on the top, in Ethiopian at bottom left and in Arabic at bottom right separately by three stars. Reverse: "PRESERVE PLANET EARTH" written at above part. Lioness and her cub sitting in the center. Denomination "$1" written at the bottom. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: Preserve Planet Earth.

Note: This coin is also produced as KM#29 in silver with same specifications and weight, but $10 as denomination (Mintage: 30,000) and KM#30 in 0.9999 Gold 6.22g as $100 (Mintage: estimated 5,000).

KM#31 1 Dollar. Year: 1994. Weight: 28.43g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Pobjoy Mint. Obverse: Dhow, camel and palm tree, date below, all within center circle. "ERITREA" written in English on the top, in Ethiopian at bottom left and in Arabic at bottom right separately by three stars. Reverse: "PRESERVE PLANET EARTH" written at above part. Cape Eagle Owl sitting in the center. Denomination "$1" written at the bottom. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: Preserve Planet Earth.

Note: This coin is also produced as KM#32 in silver with same specifications and weight, but $10 as denomination (Mintage: 30,000) and KM#33 in 0.9999 Gold 6.22g as $100 (Mintage: estimated 5,000).

 
1996
 

KM#37 1 Dollar. Year: 1994. Weight: 28.55g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Pobjoy Mint. Obverse: Dhow, camel and palm tree, date below, all within center circle. "ERITREA" written in English on the top, in Ethiopian at bottom left and in Arabic at bottom right separately by three stars. Reverse: "PRESERVE PLANET EARTH" written at above part. Laner Falcon sitting in the center. Denomination "$1" written at the bottom. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: Preserve Planet Earth.

Note: This coin is also produced as KM#38 in silver with same specifications and weight, but $10 as denomination (Mintage: 30,000) and KM#39 in 0.9999 Gold 6.22g as $100 (Mintage: estimated 5,000). Other coins produced in 1996:

  • KM#34 $1 Preserve Planet Earth "Wattled Cranes". Copper-Nickel. 28.28g. Diameter: 38.61 mm.
  • KM#35 $10 Preserve Planet Earth "Wattled Cranes". Silver. 28.28g. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Mintage: 30,000 (estimated).
  • KM#36 $100 Preserve Planet Earth "Wattled Cranes". 0.999 Gold. 6.22g. Mintage: 5,000 (estimated).
 
1997
 

Eritrea Dollar Coins produced in 1997:

  • KM#40 $1 "Triceratops, Jurassic  Park logo". Copper-Nickel. 28.28g. Diameter: 38.61 mm.
  • KM#41 $10 "Triceratops, Jurassic  Park logo". Silver. 28.28g. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Mintage: 10,000 (estimated).
  • KM#42 $100 "Triceratops, Jurassic  Park logo". 0.999 Gold. 6.22g. Mintage: 5,000 (estimated).
 
Currency: Nakfa = 100 cents.
 
1997
The designs on both the coins and the notes for Eritrea, were by Clarence Holbert. He worked for the U.S. Treasury Department’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing when he was first hired to create these images. Holbert, now retired, was one of very few blacks to ever work for the B.E.P. The obverse designs of the coins all include an animal from this part of the world, the country name “REPUBLIC OF ERITREA” with date “1997”. The reverse designs are all the same, showing the image of fighters raising the new Eritrean flag and the date “1991” (the year when the provisional government was established). Probably two coins in the same series, of the same colour and bearing the same denomination number “1” would be a little confusing to the illiterate amongst Eritrea’s population, therefore 100 cents coin is produced instead of One Nakfa. So there is no need to read the denomination, just read the number (Surinam has 100 Cent and 250 Cent coins perhaps for similar reasons).
 

KM#43 1 Cent. Year: 1997. Weight: 2.20g. Metal: Nickel Clad Steel. Diameter: 17.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Coin. Mint: N/A. Obverse: Red-fronted gazelle facing right. "STATE OF ERITREA" on the top. Reverse: Motto "LIBERTY . EQUALITY . JUSTICE" on the top. Soldiers with flag and date "1991" at left. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.

KM#44 5 Cents. Year: 1997. Weight: 2.70g. Metal: Nickel Clad Steel. Diameter: 19.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: N/A. Obverse: Leopard on log. "STATE OF ERITREA" on the top. Reverse: Motto "LIBERTY . EQUALITY . JUSTICE" on the top. Soldiers with flag and date "1991" at left. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.

KM#45 10 Cents. Year: 1997. Weight: 3.35g. Metal: Nickel Clad Steel. Diameter: 21.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: N/A. Obverse: Ostrich. "STATE OF ERITREA" on the top. Reverse: Motto "LIBERTY . EQUALITY . JUSTICE" on the top. Soldiers with flag and date "1991" at left. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.

KM#46 25 Cents. Year: 1997. Weight: 5.70g. Metal: Nickel Clad Steel. Diameter: 23.00 mm. Edge: Four patches each Reeded and Plain. Alignment: Coin. Mint: N/A. Obverse: Grevy's zebra facing left. "STATE OF ERITREA" on the top. Reverse: Motto "LIBERTY . EQUALITY . JUSTICE" on the top. Soldiers with flag and date "1991" at left. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.

KM#47 50 Cents. Year: 1997. Weight: 7.75g. Metal: Nickel Clad Steel. Diameter: 25.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: N/A. Obverse: Greater Kudu facing left. "STATE OF ERITREA" on the top. Reverse: Motto "LIBERTY . EQUALITY . JUSTICE" on the top. Soldiers with flag and date "1991" at left. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.

KM#48 100 Cents (Nakfa). Year: 1997. Weight: 10.20g. Metal: Nickel Clad Steel. Diameter: 26.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: N/A. Obverse: African elephant and baby elephant both facing left. "STATE OF ERITREA" on the top. Reverse: Motto "LIBERTY . EQUALITY . JUSTICE" on the top. Soldiers with flag and date "1991" at left. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.
 
 
 
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