Falkland Islands
 

 
 
               14 Aug 1592  First confirmed sighting of the islands by
                             English Capt. John Davis (Davis' Land).
                  Feb 1594  English navigator Richard Hawkins names the islands
                             Hawkins Maydenlande (Hawkins' Maidenland)
               27 Jan 1600  Discovered by Dutch Capt. Sebald de Weert.
               27 Jan 1690  First confirmed landing by English Capt. John Strong.
               23 Dec 1708  Named Falkland's Land by Capt. Woode Rogers.
                      1763  French name the islands the Îles Malouines.
               05 Apr 1764  French settlement on East Falkland (Fort St. Louis)
               22 Jan 1765  West Falkland Island claimed for Britain by
John Byron
               08 Jan 1766  British settlement on West Falkland (Port Egmont,
                             Falkland Islands).
               01 Apr 1767  French transfer their settlement to Spain.
                             Puerto de Soledad, named Islas Malvinas.
               20 May 1774  Spain forced British to withdraw. British continue to
                             claim sovereignty over all the Falkland Islands.
                  Feb 1811  Spanish withdraw.
               06 Nov 1820  Argentina claims sovereignty.
                      1826  Settlement at Port Louis re-established by Frenchman
                             Louis Vernet who obtains a grant to all the Falkland
                             Islands and their resources from the government of
                             Argentina.
               28 Dec 1831  U.S.S. Lexington under Commander Silas Duncan destroyed
                             Soledad, and declared the islands 'free of all
                             government' (this was in response to Vernet seizing
                             three American sealing ships).
               03 Jan 1833  British depose the Argentine governor.
               09 Jan 1834  British occupation.
               02 Jan 1842  British civil administration begun.
               06 Mar 1892  British crown colony (Falkland Islands).
 21 Jul 1908 - 03 Mar 1962  South Shetland Islands, South Orkney Islands and
                             Graham Land in Antarctica a Falklands dependency
 21 Jul 1908 - 03 Oct 1985  South Georgia & South Sandwich Islands a dependency of
                             Falkland Islands.
 02 Apr 1982 - 14 Jun 1982  Occupied by Argentina (Islas Malvinas).
 03 Oct 1985 - 01 Jan 2009  Former Constitution Order
 01 Jan 2009 - date         Constitution Order
               10 Mar 2013  Planned referendum on sovereignty over islands.
 
 

 

  • Repeatedly sighted during the 17th century. The first unambiguous report was British, from about 1592, and the first known landing (1690) was also British, but French, Dutch, and Spanish ships were also aware of its existence.
  • France (only East Falkands)......................05 Apr 1764 - 01 Apr 1767
  • Great Britain (only West Falklands)..............08 Jan 1766 - 10 Jun 1770
  • Spain (only East Falkands).......................01 Apr 1767 - Feb 1811
  • Spain briefly took West Falkands from 10 Jun 1770 to  16 Apr 1771.
  • Great Britain (only West Falklands)..............16 Apr 1771 – 20 May 1774
  • West Falklands became uninhabited and was claimed by Spain, while the British claimed the complete Falkland Islands from 1774 to Feb 1811.
  • Uninhabited.........................................Feb 1811 - 06 Nov 1820
  • Argentina........................................06 Nov 1820 - 03 Jan 1833
  • Great Britain....................................03 Jan 1833 - 02 Apr 1982
  • Argentina........................................02 Apr 1982 - 14 Jun 1982
    • Argentine military Governor
    • Mario Benjamín Menéndez.....................02 Apr 1982 - 14 Jun 1982
  • Great Britain....................................14 Jun 1982 - date
 
 
The Falkland Islands (Spanish: Islas Malvinas) are an archipelago located in the South Atlantic Ocean on the Patagonian Shelf. The principal islands are about 310 miles (500 kilometres) east of the Patagoinian coast at a latitude of about 52°S. The archipelago which has an area of 4,700 square miles (12,173 square kilometres) comprises East Falkland, West Falkland and 776 smaller islands. The islands, a British Overseas Territory, enjoy a large degree of internal self-government with the United Kingdom guaranteeing good government and taking responsibility for their defence and foreign affairs. The capital: Stanley on East Falkland (Puerto Argentino Apr-Jun 1982; Port Jackson 1843-Jul 1845; Fort Louis 1833-1843; Puerto Soledad 1767-1833; Fort St. Louis 1764-1767). Motto: "Desire the right".
 
Controversy exists as to who first discovered the Falkland Islands, with competing Portuguese, Spanish, and British claims in the 16th century. While Amerindians from Patagonia could have visited the Falklands, the islands were uninhabited when discovered by Europeans. The first reliable sighting is usually attributed to the Dutch explorer Sebald de Weert in 1600, who named the archipelago the Sebald Islands, a name they bore on Dutch maps into the 19th century. In 1690, Captain John Strong of the Welfare en route to Puerto Deseado was driven off course and reached the Falkland Islands instead, landing at Bold Cove. Sailing between the two principal islands, he called the passage "Falkland Channel" (now Falkland Sound), after Anthony Cary, 5th Viscount of Falkland, who as Commissioner of the Admiralty had financed the expedition. The island group takes its English name from this body of water. In 1764, French navigator and military commander Louis Antoine de Bougainville founded the first settlement on Berkeley Sound, in present-day Port Louis, East Falkland.[19] In 1765, British captain John Byron explored and claimed Saunders Island on West Falkland, where he named the harbour Port Egmont and a settlement was constructed in 1766. Unaware of the French presence, Byron claimed the island group for King George III. Spain acquired the French colony in 1767, and placed it under a governor subordinate to the Buenos Aires colonial administration. In 1770, Spain attacked Port Egmont and expelled the British presence, bringing the two countries to the brink of war. War was avoided by a peace treaty and the British return to Port Egmont.

In 1774, economic pressures leading up to the American Revolutionary War forced Great Britain to withdraw from many overseas settlements. Upon withdrawal, the British left behind a plaque asserting Britain's continued claim. Spain maintained its governor until 1806 who, on his departure, left behind a plaque asserting Spanish claims. The remaining settlers were withdrawn in 1811. In 1820, storm damage forced the privateer Heroína to take shelter in the islands. Her captain David Jewett raised the flag of the United Provinces of the River Plate and read a proclamation claiming the islands. This became public knowledge in Buenos Aires nearly a year later after the proclamation was published in the Salem Gazette. After several failures, Luis Vernet established a settlement in 1828 with authorisation from the Republic of Buenos Aires and from Great Britain. In 1829, after asking for help from Buenos Aires, he was instead proclaimed Military and Civil Commander of the islands. Additionally, Vernet asked the British to protect his settlement if they returned. A dispute over fishing and hunting rights resulted in a raid by the US warship USS Lexington in 1831. The log of the Lexington reports only the destruction of arms and a powder store, but Vernet made a claim for compensation from the US Government stating that the settlement was destroyed. Compensation was rejected by the US Government of President Cleveland in 1885. The islands were declared free from all government, the seven senior members of the settlement were arrested for piracy and taken to Montevideo, where they were released without charge on the orders of Commodore Rogers.

In November 1832, Argentina sent Commander Mestivier as an interim commander to found a penal settlement, but he was killed in a mutiny after four days. The following January, British forces returned and requested the Argentine garrison leave. Don Pinedo, captain of the ARA Sarandi and senior officer present, protested but ultimately complied. Vernet's settlement continued, with the Irishman William Dickson tasked with raising the British flag for passing ships. Vernet's deputy, Matthew Brisbane, returned and was encouraged by the British to continue the enterprise. The settlement continued until August 1833, when the leaders were killed in the so-called Gaucho murders. Subsequently, from 1834 the islands were governed as a British naval station until 1840 when the British Government decided to establish a permanent colony.

A new harbour was built in Stanley, and the islands became a strategic point for navigation around Cape Horn. A World War I naval battle, the Battle of the Falkland Islands, took place in December 1914, with a British victory over the smaller Imperial German Asiatic Fleet. During World War II, Stanley served as a Royal Navy station and serviced ships which took part in the 1939 Battle of the River Plate. Sovereignty over the islands again became an issue in the second half of the 20th century, when Argentina saw the creation of the UN as an opportunity to pursue its claim. Talks between British and Argentine foreign missions took place in the 1960s but failed to come to any meaningful conclusion. A major sticking point in all the negotiations was that the inhabitants preferred that the islands remain British territory. A result of these talks, in 1971, the Argentine state airline LADE began a service between Comodoro Rivadavia and Stanley. A temporary strip was followed by the construction of a permanent airfield and flights between Stanley and Comodoro Rivadavia continued until 1982. Further agreements gave YPF, the Argentine national oil and gas company, a monopoly over the supply of the islands energy needs.

On 02 April 1982, Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands and other British territories in the South Atlantic. By exploiting the long-standing feelings of Argentines towards the islands, the nation's ruling military junta sought to divert public attention from Argentina's poor economic performance and growing internal opposition. Nevertheless, the United Kingdom's reduction of military capacity in the South Atlantic also encouraged the invasion and won the war.

The United Kingdom and Argentina both claim responsibility for the Falkland Islands. The UK bases its position on continuous administration of the islands since 1833 (apart from 1982) and the islanders having a "right to self determination, including their right to remain British if that is their wish". Argentina posits that it gained the Falkland Islands from Spain, upon becoming independent from it in 1816, and that the UK illegally occupied them in 1833. Under the British Nationality Act of 1983, Falkland Islanders are legally British citizens. The islands are a British Overseas Territory which, under the 2009 Constitution, enjoys a large degree of internal self-government, with the United Kingdom guaranteeing good government and taking responsibility for defence and foreign affairs.
 
 
Monetary standard: Falkland Island Pound (FKP or FK£) = 100 pence.
The Falklands pound has always been pegged to the pound sterling at par and banknotes of both currencies are used interchangeably on the islands (although only notes issued by banks in the United Kingdom are generally accepted in Britain itself). The pound was introduced following the reassertion of sovereignty in the Falklands Islands by the British in 1833. Initially, the British currency circulated, with the pound subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence. Specific issues of banknotes have been made for the Falkland Islands since 1899. In 1971, the pound was decimalised and subdivided into 100 pence. Circulated coins have been minted specifically for the Falklands since 1974 and Commemorative coin from 1977. During the earlier Argentine occupation, the peso circulated. In 1974, ½, 1, 2, 5 and 10 pence coins were introduced. 50 pence coins were introduced in 1980, followed by 20 pence in 1982, 1 pound in 1987 and a circulating 2 pounds in 2004. The ½ penny coin was last issued in 1983 and was demonetised shortly after. Smaller versions of the 5p, 10p and 50p, corresponding to the current UK issues, were issued in 1998, replacing the larger versions (which for the 5p was eight years after its introduction in the UK). The introduction of the circulation £2 coin in 2004 was six years after the same coin was issued in the UK. All the coins have the same composition and size as the corresponding British coins.
 
1980
 

KM#14.1 50 Pence. Year: 1980. Weight: 13.38g [13.65g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.00 mm; 7-sided. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Numeral "50" written on the top. Falkland Island fox (extinct since 1876) in the center. "FALKLAND ISLANDS" with date written at the bottom part. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1992 and 1995.

Engravers: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

KM#15 50 pence. Year: ND (1980). Weight: 28.26g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 38.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "· QUEEN ELIZABETH II · FALKLAND ISLANDS ·" written around her. Value "50 PENCE" at the bottom. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth, The Queen's Mother portrait in facing left. "QUEEN ELIZABETH" written on the left side clockwise and "THE QUEEN MOTHER" written on the right side clockwise. "1900 · AUGUST 4 · 1980" written at the bottom. Mintage: 46,673. Minted Years: One year type.

Note: This coin also exits in 0.925 silver as KM#15a (Mintage: 8,609) with same weight and diameter.

Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon (04 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was the wife of King George VI and the mother of Queen Elizabeth II. She was queen consort of the United Kingdom from her husband's accession in 1936 until his death in 1952, after which she was known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, to avoid confusion with her daughter.

 
1983
 

KM#4.1 5 Pence. Year: 1983. Weight: 5.64g [5.65g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 23.60 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Blackbrowed albatross in flight in the center with numeral "5" below it. "FALKLAND" written on the left side clockwise and "ISLANDS" on the right side clockwise. Year at the bottom.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1974, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987 and 1992. Engravers: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

KM#5.1 10 Pence. Year: 1983. Weight: 11.41g  [11.31g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 28.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written on the top. Ursine seal with cub in the center and numeral "10" below it. Year at the bottom left side. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1974, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987 and 1992.

Engravers: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

 
1992
 

KM#2 1 Penny. Year: 1992. Weight: 3.52g [3.56g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 20.32 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written above. Two Gentoo penguins in the center with numeral "1" between them. Year at the bottom.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1974, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987 and 1992. Engravers: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

KM#3 2 Pence. Year: 1992. Weight: 7.08g [7.12g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.90 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Numeral "2" at the top. Upland goose (Magellan Goose) with opened wings in the center. "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written below. Year on the right side.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1974, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987 and 1992. Engravers: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

KM#4.1 5 Pence. Year: 1992. Weight: 5.68g [5.65g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 23.60 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Blackbrowed albatross in flight in the center with numeral "5" below it. "FALKLAND" written on the left side clockwise and "ISLANDS" on the right side clockwise. Year at the bottom.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1974, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987 and 1992. Engravers: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

KM#17 20 Pence. Year: 1992. Weight: 5.08g [5.00g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 21.95 mm; 7-sided. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Numeral "20" at the top. Romney marsh sheep facing left in the center. "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written below. Year on the right side. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1992, 1998 and 1999.
Note: The Romney, formerly called the Romney Marsh sheep is also found on Falkland Island's flag and Coat of Arms. The Romney is an economically-important sheep breed, especially to the sheep-meat and wool export trades. They are found in abundance in Kent, England and New Zealand as well. Romneys are said to be somewhat resistant to foot rot, liver flukes and other problems that often plague sheep in damp pastures.

Engravers: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth side) and Robert Elderton (value side).

KM#34 50 pence. Year: ND (1992). Weight: 28.23g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 38.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "· QUEEN ELIZABETH II · FALKLAND ISLANDS ·" written around her. Value "50 PENCE" at the bottom. Reverse: Three figures standing, one at left is silhouette. "40th ANNIVERSARY OF REIGN 1952-1992" written on the left side clockwise. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: 40th Anniversary - Reign of Queen Elizabeth II. Engravers: Raphael David Maklouf (Queen Elizabeth side) and Willem Vis (Three figure standing side).

Note: This coin also exits in 0.925 silver as KM#34a (Mintage: 5,000) with same weight and diameter and in 0.916 gold as KM#34b (Mintage: 150) with weight 47.54g with same diamater.

 
1998
 

KM#4.2 5 Pence. Year: 1998. Weight: 3.23g [3.25g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 18.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Blackbrowed albatross in flight in the center with numeral "5" below it. "FALKLAND" written on the left side clockwise and "ISLANDS" on the right side clockwise. Year at the bottom.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1998 and 1999. Engravers: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

KM#17 20 Pence. Year: 1998. Weight: 4.96g [5.00g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 21.95 mm; 7-sided. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Numeral "20" at the top. Romney marsh sheep facing left in the center. "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written below. Year on the right side.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1992, 1998 and 1999. Engravers: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth side) and Robert Elderton (value side).
 
1999
 

KM#64 2 Pounds. Year: 1999. Weight: 28.58g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 38.60 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Pobjoy Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth II's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH II FALKLAND ISLANDS" written around her. Year at the bottom. Reverse: "SIR ERNEST HENRY SHACKLETON" written on the top. Endurance Ship in the center. Sir E. H. Shackleton's face in oval in center right side. Year "1874" written on the bottom left side and Year "1922" written on the bottom right side. Value "TWO POUNDS" at the bottom. Mintage: 981. Minted Years: One year type.

Note: This coin also exits in 0.925 silver as KM#64a (Mintage: 2,322) with same weight and diameter.

In April 1916, Ernest Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition became stranded on Elephant Island, some 800 miles (1,300 km) southwest of South Georgia. Shackleton and five companions set out in a small boat to summon help, and on 10 May, after an epic voyage, they landed at King Haakon Bay on South Georgia's south coast. While three stayed at the coast, Shackleton and the two others, Tom Crean and Frank Worsley, went on to cover 22 miles (35 km) overland to reach help at Stromness whaling station. The remaining 22 members of the expedition, who had stayed on Elephant Island, were subsequently rescued. In January 1922, during a later expedition, Shackleton died on board ship while moored in King Edward Cove, South Georgia. He is buried at Grytviken.

 
2000
 

KM#67 2 Pounds. Year: 2000. Weight: 28.42g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 38.60 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Pobjoy Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth II's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH II FALKLAND ISLANDS" written around her. Year at the bottom. Reverse: "THE GOLD RUSH VICAR OF BRAY" written on the top. Ship at the harbor with a person carrying goods on this back. Value "TWO POUNDS" at the bottom. Mintage: 914. Minted Years: One year type.

Note: This coin also exits in silver as KM#67a (Mintage: 1010) with same weight and diameter.

KM#69a 2 Pounds. Year: 1999-2000 (Millennium issue). Weight: 28.15g [28.10g]. Metal: 0.925 Silver; Bi-Metallic, Silver in center and in Gold-plated Silver in outer ring. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth II's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH II · FALKLAND ISLANDS" written around her. Year "· 1999 · 2000 ·" at the bottom. Reverse: Islands map, radiant sun, and denomination "TWO POUNDS" within circle of local wildlife. Mintage: 3,655. Minted Years: One year type. Designer: Raphael Maklouf (Queen Elizabeth side) and Mathew Bonaccorsi (value side).

Note: This coin also exits as KM#69 (Mintage: 3,419) in Copper-Nickel center and Nickel-Brass in outer ring. Plain edge with 28.28g weight and 38.61 mm diameter.

 
2004
 

KM#130 1 Penny. Year: 2004. Weight: 3.54g [3.56g]. Metal: Bronze plated steel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 20.32 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written above. Two Gentoo penguins in the center with numeral "1" between them. Year at the bottom.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2004 and 2011. Engravers: Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

KM#131 2 Pence. Year: 2004. Weight: 7.12g [7.12g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.90 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Numeral "2" at the top. Upland goose (Magellan Goose) with opened wings in the center. "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written below. Year on the right side. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2004 and 2011.
Engravers: Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

KM#133a 10 Pence. Year: 2004. Weight: 6.48g  [6.50g]. Metal: Copper Clad Steel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 24.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written on the top. Ursine seal with cub in the center and numeral "10" below it. Year at the bottom left side.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type. Engravers: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

Note: Falkland used the old dies for striking new magnetic coins. Therefore 5 Pence 2011 and 10 Pence 2004 exist in non magnetic and magnetic versions.

KM#134 20 Pence. Year: 2004. Weight: 5.15g [5.00g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 21.95 mm; 7-sided. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Numeral "20" at the top. Romney marsh sheep facing left in the center. "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written below. Year on the right side. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.
Engravers: Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth side) and Robert Elderton (value side).

KM#137 2 Pounds. Year: 2004. Weight: 11.99g [12.00g]. Metal: Bi-Metallic; Copper-nickel center and Nickel-brass ring. Edge: Reeded and Lettering "30 YEARS OF FALKLAND ISLANDS COINAGE ·". Diameter: 28.40 mm. Thickness: 2.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint.
Obverse: Queen Elizabeth II's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Year "2004" at the bottom. Reverse: "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written at the top within inner circle. Islands map, radiant sun, and denomination "TWO POUNDS" at the bottom within circle. Various local wildlife in outer circle. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2003 and 2004.

Engravers: Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth side) and Mathew Bonaccorsi (value side).

 
2011
 

KM#130 1 Penny. Year: 2011. Weight: 3.54g [3.56g]. Metal: Bronze plated steel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 20.32 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written above. Two Gentoo penguins in the center with numeral "1" between them. Year at the bottom.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2004 and 2011. Engravers: Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

KM#131 2 Pence. Year: 2011. Weight: 7.04g [7.12g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.90 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Numeral "2" at the top. Upland goose (Magellan Goose) with opened wings in the center. "FALKLAND ISLANDS" written below. Year on the right side.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2004 and 2011. Engravers: Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

KM#132 5 Pence. Year: 2011. Weight: 3.18g [3.25g]. Metal: Copper Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 18.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Blackbrowed albatross in flight in the center with numeral "5" below it. "FALKLAND" written on the left side clockwise and "ISLANDS" on the right side clockwise. Year at the bottom.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait facing right in the center with "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2004 and 2011. Engravers: Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth side) and William Maving Gardner (value side).

Note: Falkland used the old dies for striking new magnetic coins. Therefore 5 Pence 2011 and 10 Pence 2004 exist in non magnetic and magnetic versions.

  Same as above coin, but...

KM#132s 5 Pence. Year: 2011. Weight: 3.18g [3.25g]. Metal: Copper Clad Steel.

 
2014
 

2 Pounds. Year: 2014. Weight: 12.02g [12.00g]. Metal: Bi-Metallic; Copper-nickel center and Nickel-brass ring. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 28.40 mm. Thickness: 2.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint.
Obverse: Queen Elizabeth II's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Year "2014" at the bottom. Reverse: "BATTLE OF THE FALKLAND ISLANDS" written at the top. Ship firing missiles within inner circle. "TWO POUNDS" at the bottom. Three smaller ships on each side in outer circle. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2003 and 2004.

Engravers: Ian Rank-Broadley (obverse side).

 
 
 
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