Jersey
 

 
Jersey, officially the Bailiwick of Jersey (French: Bailliage de Jersey), is a British Crown dependency in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. The bailiwick consists of: Jersey, Les Dirouilles, Les Écréhous, Les Minquiers, Les Pierres de Lecq and other reefs.
 
               933          Part of the Duchy of Normandy.
               Jun 1204     Jersey and English fiefdom; to 1487 subordinated
                             to Guernsey.
        1204 - Sep 1205     French occupation.
    Dec 1205 - Apr 1206     French occupation.
               04 Dec 1259  English possession of Channel Islands confirmed by
                             Treaty of Paris.
                      1279  Bailiwick of (Bailiwick of Jersey
                             [including Minquiers and Ecréhous islands]).
             1356 (months)  French occupation.
               24 Oct 1360  Channel Islands no longer under the suzerainty of the
                             King of France, by Treaty of Calais.
               1373 (weeks) French invasion by Bertrand du Guesclin.
        1380 - 1382         French occupation.
        1461 - 1468         French occupation.
        1642 - Nov 1643     During the English Civil War Parliamentarians operate
                             from St. Helier, while Royalists hold Mont Orgueil
                             Castle.
        1642 - 12 Dec 1651  Jersey under Royalist control.
 12 Dec 1651 - 08 May 1660  Jersey part of the Commonwealth of England.
 05 Jan 1781 - 07 Jan 1781  Brief French occupation.
        1848 - 17 Dec 1896  Philippe Pinel (b. 1820 - d. 1896) lives on Bliantch
                             Île and from Jul 1863 proclaims himself Le Roi des
                             Ecréhous ("king of the Ecréhous").
                      1886  Ecréhous islands claimed by France.
                      1888  Minquiers islands claimed by France.
 01 Jul 1940 - 09 May 1945  German occupation (Britische Kanalinseln) subordinated
                             to occupied France.
 12 May 1945 - 25 Aug 1945  British military administration (see Guernsey).
               17 Nov 1953  International Court of Justice confirms British
                             sovereignty over Minquiers and Ecréhous island

 

The Bailiwick of Jersey (In the dialect of Norman: Jèrriais; French: "Jèrri") is a British Crown dependency off the coast of Normandy, France. Jersey is a self-governing parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarchy, with its own financial, legal and judicial systems, and the power of self-determination. The island of Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands. Although the Bailiwicks of Jersey and Guernsey are often referred to collectively as the Channel Islands, the "Channel Islands" are not a constitutional or political unit. Jersey has a separate relationship to the British Crown from the other Crown dependencies of Guernsey and the Isle of Man. It is not part of the United Kingdom, and has an international identity separate from that of the UK but the United Kingdom is constitutionally responsible for the defense of Jersey. Area: 118.2 km2 (45.56 sq mi). Capital and largest city: Saint Helier.
The Commission have confirmed in a written reply to the European Parliament in 2003 that Jersey is within the Union as a European Territory for whose external relationships the United Kingdom is responsible. Jersey is not fully part of the European Union but has a special relationship with it, notably being treated as within the European Community for the purposes of free trade in goods.

Historically, Jersey was governed by a local council called the States of Jersey; this body was presided over by a bailiff appointed by the Crown (hence "bailiwick") who also was in charge of the jurats (elected court bodies) and represented the Crown in civil affairs. The Bailiff held office for life traditionally; today he is limited to serving until age 70. In addition to the Bailiff the island had a Governor (from the 1850's, a Lieutenant Governor) who organized the defence of the island. An interesting side-note: The Channel Islands are the only remnants of the old Duchy of Normandy. Norman law still holds sway, including the obscure "Clameur de haro". This practice, whereby one can obtain an injunction of restraint simply by throwing one's hands in the air, crying out "Haro! Haro! Haro! À l'aide, mon Prince, on me fait tort" (Hear me! Hear me! Hear me! Come to my aid, my Prince, for someone does me wrong) and reciting the Lord's Prayer in French, was last invoked as late as 2000. Technically, the Channel Islands still constitute the entire remaining territory of the Duchy; however, because of a treaty between Britain and France, the British Crown does not use the title "Duke (or, currently, 'Duchess') of Normandy", but rather holds title to the Channel Islands as King/Queen. The locals, by and large will have none of it, however, and are proud of their traditions - they still refer to the reigning monarch as "The King/Queen, our Duke/Duchess".

 
  • Gallic tribes (probably the Venelli or Veneti).............. ? - c. 54 BCE
  • Unknown chronology c. 54 BCE - 56 CE
  • Roman Empire................................................56 - 395
  • Western Roman Empire.......................................395 - 461
  • Domain of Soissons (Kingdom of Syagrius)...................461 - 486
  • Unknown (possibly to Domnonee or Brittany).................486 - 511
  • Neustria...................................................511 - ?
  • Brittany.................................................... ? - 866
  • Hastein (Norse invader, also in Brittany)..................866 - 870's
  • Brittany (with frequent Norse incursions and settlement)...890 - 933
  • Normandy (England from 1066)...............................933 - Jun 1204
  • English Fiefdom subordinated to Guernsey..............Jun 1204 - 1204
  • France....................................................1204 - Sep 1205
  • English Fiefdom subordinated to Guernsey..............Sep 1205 - Dec 1205
  • France................................................Dec 1205 - Apr 1206
  • English Fiefdom subordinated to Guernsey..............Apr 1206 - 1279
    • Bailiffs of Jersey
    • Pierre de Préaux (de facto).........................1204 - ? d. 1212
    • Drouet de Barentin (also governor)...............c. 1258 - c. 1271
    • Jean de Carteret (1st time).........................1271 - 1274
    • Arnauld Jean (Arnold Johannis de Contivo)..................fl. 1274
    • Philippe Levesque (L'Evesque) (1st time)............1277 - 1289
  • England..................................................1279 - 1380
    • Pierre de Arcis (Pierre d'Arcis [or Pierre Darcy])..1290 - 1294
    • Jean de Carteret (2nd time).........................1294 - 1298
    • Nicolas Hastein............................................1298
    • Raoul Gautier..............................................1299
    • Philippe Levesque (2nd time)...............................1299
    • Jean de Carteret (3rd time)................................1302
    • Philippe Levesque (3rd time)...............................1309
    • Colin? Hasteyn (possibly Nicolas Hastein)..................fl. 1315
    • Henry de St. Martin........................................fl. 1318
    • Guillaume Longynnour
    • Herny de St.Martin
    • Pierre Hugoun Ugoun (Ygon) (1st time)
    • Lucas de Espyard
    • Pierre de la Haye
    • Philippe de Vincheleis (1st time)..........................fl. c. 1324
    • Guillaume Dyrvaud (acting)
    • Galfrus de Hoga
    • Pierre Hugoun Ugoun (Ygon) (2nd time)......................1329
    • Geoffrey de la Hougue......................................1329 ?
    • Nicolas (or Colin) Hasteyn (2nd time)......................c. 1332
    • Philippe de Vincheleis (2nd time)
    • Matthieu Le Loreour
    • Pierre de la Haye (probably II or 2nd time?)
    • Guillaume Brasdefer........................................fl. 1331
    • Raoul Turgis...............................................fl. 1332
    • Guille Hastein (Guille Hastings) [1st time]................fl. 1348
    • Roger de Powderham.........................................fl. 1351
    • Guille Hastein (2nd time)..................................fl. 1352
    • John Cockerell.............................................fl. 1356
    • Raoul Lemprière (1st time).................................fl. 1357
    • unknown ruler
    • Raoul Lemprière (2nd time)..........................1362 - 1364
    • Richard de Saint Martin.............................1367 - 1368
    • Richard le Petit....................................1368 - 1369
    • John [Jean] de Saint Martin (1st time)..............1369 - 1373
    • Geffroi de Saint Martin.............................1373 - 1374
    • John [Jean] de Saint Martin (2nd time).......01 Feb 1374 - Dec 1376
    • Thomas Brasdefer (1st time).........................1378 - 1380
  • France...................................................1380 - 1382
  • England..................................................1382 - 1461
    • Thomas de Bethom...........................................1386
    • Thomas Brasdefer (2nd time).........................1386 - 1391
    • Giefrey [Godefroy] Brasdefer.................06 Nov 1395 - Sep 1401
    • Colin le Petit..................................Sep 1401 - 1403
    • unknown ruler
    • Guillaume de Laye (or de Layc)......................1405 - 1406
    • Thomas Danyel.......................................1406 - 1425
    • Sir John Bernard (1st time)................................1432 d. 1351
    • unknown ruler
    • Thomad de la Cour..........................................1435
    • John Lemprière......................................1435 - 1436
    • Sir John Bernard (2nd time).........................1436 - 1444
    • unknown ruler
    • John Payn (1st time).......................................1444
    • unknown ruler
    • John Payn (2nd time).......................................1446
    • Regnauld (Renaud) de Carteret.......................1446 - 1451
    • Jean (John) Poingdestre (1st time)..................1452 - 1453 d. 1453
    • Nicolas Morin (Mourin) (1st time)...................1459 - 1462 d. 1475
  • France...................................................1461 - 1468
    • Nicolas Morin (2nd time)............................1464 - 1468
  • England..................................................1468 - 1781
    • Jean (John) Poingdestre (2nd time)..................1468 - 1477
    • unknown ruler
    • Guillaume Hareby (1st time).........................1479 - 1481
    • unknown ruler
    • Guillaume Hareby (2nd time).........................1484 - 1485
    • Clément Le Hardy....................................1486 - 1493
    • Jean Nicolle...............................................1494
    • Thomas Lemprière (1st time)..................27 Mar 1495 - 1513
    • Hélier de Carteret (1st time).......................1513 - 1514 d. 1578
    • Thomas Lemprière (2nd time)................................1515
    • Hélier de Carteret (2nd time).......................1515 - 1523
    • Hélier de la Rocque (1st time)......................1523 - 1524
    • John Lemprière (1st time)...........................1524 - 1527 d. 1534
    • Sir Richard Mabon...................................1524 - 1527 d. 1543
    • Hélier de Carteret (3rd time)..............................1527
    • John Lemprière (2nd time)..................................1528
    • Jasper Pen (Payn)...................................1528 - 1529
    • Hélier de la Rocque (2nd time)......................1529 - 1530
    • Clément Lemprière...................................1529 - 1530
    • He was acting for suspended la Rocque.
    • Hélier de Carteret (4th time).......................1530 - 1560
    • Hostes Nicolle...............................08 Mar 1561 - 1564 d. 1564
    • Eduard Dumaresq (acting)............................1564 - 1566
    • John Dumaresqu (1st time)...........................1566 - Aug 1583 d. 1603
    • George Paulett (1st time)...........................1583 - 1586 d. 1621
    • John Dumaresqu (2nd time)...........................1586 - 1587
    • George Paulett (2nd time)...........................1587 - 1591
    • John Dumaresqu (3rd time)...........................1591 - 1594
    • George Paulett (3rd time)...........................1594 - 1614
    • John Hérault (1st time)......................09 Aug 1615 - 1621 d. 1626
    • Sir William Parkhurst...............................1622 - 1624
    • John Hérault (2nd time).............................1624 - 1626
    • Sir Philip de Carteret II...........................1627 - 22 Aug 1643
    • Michael Lemprière (1st time)....................Aug 1643 - Nov 1643
    • Sir George Carteret (1st time)..................Nov 1643 - 17 Dec 1651
    • Puritan Bailiff
    • Michael Lemprière (2nd time).................17 Dec 1651 - 1660
    • Bailiffs of Jersey
    • Royalist authority restored
    • Sir George Carteret (2nd time).....................1660 - 1661
    • Sir Philip de Carteret......................26 Feb 1661 - Nov 1662 d. 1662
    • Philippe de Carteret of Grouville..................1662 - Sep 1665 d. 1665
    • Sir Édouard de Carteret............................1665 - 1682 d. 1683
    • Sir Philip de Carteret.............................1682 - 1693 d. 1693
    • Édouard de Carteret................................1694 - 1703 d. 1703
    • Charles de Carteret................................1703 - 06 Jun 1715
    • John Carteret, Baron Carteret......................1715 - 02 Jan 1763
    • He was known from 18 Oct 1744 as Earl Granville.
    • Robert Carteret, Earl Granville....................1763 - 13 Sep 1776
    • Henry Frederick Carteret...........................1776 - 17 Jun 1826
    • He was known from 29 Jan 1784 as Baron Carteret.
  • Occupied by France...............................05 Jan 1781 - 07 Jan 1781
  • Great Britain...........................................1781 - 1940
    • Thomas Le Breton...................................1826 - 1831 d. 1838
    • Sir Jean de Veulle.................................1831 - 1848 d. 1848
    • Sir Thomas Le Breton...............................1848 - 1857 d. 1857
    • Jean (John) Hammond.........................27 Feb 1858 - 1880 d. 1880
    • Sir Robert Pipon Marett............................1880 - 10 Nov 1884
    • George Clement Bertram.............................1884 - 1898 d. 1915
    • He was known from 01 Aug 1785 as Sir George Clement Bertram.
    • Charles Edward Malet de Carteret (1st time acting)........1898 d. 1946
    • William Henry Venables-Vernon......................1899 - 1931 d. 1934
    • He was known from 18 Dec 1903 as Sir William Henry Venables-Vernon.
    • Charles Edward Malet de Carteret (2nd time).20 May 1931 - 15 Jul 1935
    • Philip de Carteret Le Cornu (acting)........16 Jul 1935 - 27 Aug 1935
    • Alexander Moncrieff Coutanche...............27 Aug 1935 - 17 Nov 1961
    • He was known from 05 Dec 1945 as Sir Alexander Moncrieff Coutanche. He was also President of the Superior Council during 1940-1945
  • Occupied by Germany.....................................1940 - 1945
  • The people of Jersey were the only British subjects to be under German occupation during World War II. Although there were some who fought clandestine operations against the occupiers, many of the citizens openly collaborated with the Nazis. Those Jews who did not flee ahead of the German invasion were deported en masse; virtually none survived the war.
  • Great Britain..........................................1945 - date
    • Cecil Stanley Harrison.....................17 Nov 1961 - 14 Apr 1962
    • He was acting to 19 Jan 1962. He died in 1962.
    • Robert Hugh Le Masurier....................14 Apr 1962 - 31 Dec 1974
    • He was acing to 06 Jul 1962. He was known from 25 Oct 1966 as Sir Robert Hugh Le Masurierd. He died in 1996.
    • Herbert Frank Cobbold Ereaut...............01 Jan 1975 - 31 Dec 1985
    • He was known from 23 Nov 1976 as Sir Herbert Frank Cobbold Ereaut. He died in 1988.
    • Peter Leslie Crill.........................01 Jan 1985 - 02 Feb 1995
    • He was known from 22 Jul 1987 as Sir Peter Leslie Crill. He died in 2005.
    • Philip Martin Bailhache....................02 Feb 1995 - 09 Jul 2009
    • He was known from 15 Jun 1996 as Sir Philip Martin Bailhache.
    • Michael Birt...............................09 Jul 2009 - date
    • He was known from 16 Jun 2012 as Sir Michael Birt.
  • Chief Ministers
  • Frank Harrison Walker..........................08 Dec 2005 - 12 Dec 2008
  • Terry Le Sueur.................................12 Dec 2008 - 18 Nov 2011
  • Ian Gorst......................................18 Nov 2011 - date
 
 
Monetary standard 1841-1871: Shillings = 13 pence (d). This standard was used till 1876.
The livre was the currency of Jersey until 1834. It consisted of French coins which, in the early 19th century, were exchangeable for sterling at a rate of 26 livres = 1 pound. After the livre was replaced by the Franc in France in 1795, the supply of coins in Jersey dwindled leading to difficulties in trade and payment. In 1834, an Order in Council adopted the pound sterling as Jersey's sole official legal tender, although French copper coins continued to circulate alongside British silver coins, with 26 sous equal to the shilling. Because the sous remained the chief small-change coins, when a new copper coinage was issued for Jersey in 1841, it was based on a penny worth 1⁄13 of a shilling (1/260 Pound), the equivalent of 2 sous. This system continued until 31st Dec 1876, when a penny of 1⁄12 of a shilling was introduced.
 
Victoria Coinage (1841-1894)
 
1841
These unusual denominations can be traced to back to the act of September 18, 1834. This act decreed that English money would be the sole legal tender in Jersey. At that time, 26 French livres were equal to one English pound. With 20 shillings to the pound and 20 sous to the livre, one shilling was worth 26 sous. Thus the Jersey penny or pièce de deux sous became 1/13th of a shilling, the Jersey half penny or sou 1/26th of a shilling, and the farthing or pièce de deux liards 1/52nd of a shilling. One additional thing of interest about this act was that no one was obliged to receive in payment more than the value of one shilling in copper money.

These coins were ordered on July 13, 1840, sanctioned on September 11, 1840, and struck at the Royal Mint in 1841. William Wyon engraved the dies. The obverse has a dexter bust of Queen Victoria, with hair banded, as in the English coinage of that period, with the legend “VICTORIA: D: G: BRITANNIAR: REGINA F:D:” and the date. The legend in English is “Victoria, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith.” The reverse has an ornamented shield of the arms of Jersey (gules and three gold colored lions passant gardent) with the legend “STATES OF JERSEY” around the upper half, while “1/52 OF A SHILLING”, “1/26 OF A SHILLING”, or “1/13 OF A SHILLING” around the lower half. The Jersey Government supplied this design to the Royal Mint. Then on November 12, 1841, the new coins arrived in Jersey aboard the steamship: Transit. During their twenty-five year life span, coins were issued only once for the one farthing and five times for both the half penny and penny. Also, proof only issues were struck in 1861 for the farthing and in 1865 for the penny. Due to the rise in copper prices, these heavy oversized copper coins were replaced in 1866 with smaller bronze coinage and then finally withdrawn from circulation in 1869 for recoinage.
 

KM#1 152 Shilling. Year: 1841. Weight: 4.07g. Metal: Copper. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 21.90 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Victoria portrait facing left in the center. "VICTORIA D:G: BRITANNIAR: REGINA F:D:" written around her. "W. W." incuse written at her truncation. Date written at the bottom.

Type III: My coin has the spacing between the four and the one in the date is 0.52 mm (the one is over the left portion of the zero) without striations (vertical lines from the hair knot parallel to the neck).
Reverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "152 OF A SHILLING." written at the bottom section. Mintage: 116,480. Minted Years: 1841, 1841 Proof and 1861 Proof. Engraver: William Wyon (Victoria's portrait side).

Note: There are four die varieties for this coin consisting of four obverse dies paired with a single reverse dies. Differences can be noted by comparing the placement of the one (over a zero) in the date.

  • Type I: The spacing between the four and the one in the date is 0.78 mm (the one is over the right portion of the zero).
  • Type II: Same as Type I with striations (vertical lines from the hair knot parallel to the neck).
  • Type III: The spacing between the four and the one in the date is 0.52 mm (the one is over the left portion of the zero).
  • Type IV: Same as Type III with striations (vertical lines from the hair knot parallel to the neck).

On the 1841 coins, the last one in the date is struck over a zero. The obverse die was also used for the Gibraltar 1841 proof one quart and the 1842 one quart circulation issues. The effigy (but not the legend) appears to be the one used on the 1839 Isle of Man farthing. There are proof examples for both issues of 1841 and 1861. However, the 1861 issue exists only as a proof issue. For the 1861 Proof coins, examples exists in both copper and bronze. The bronze proof coins of 1861 are extremely scarce.

KM#2 126 Shilling. Year: 1841. Weight: 8.76g. Metal: Copper. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 28.10 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Victoria portrait facing left in the center. "VICTORIA D:G: BRITANNIAR: REGINA F:D:" written around her. "W. W." incuse written at her truncation. Date written at the bottom.
Reverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "126 OF A SHILLING." written at the bottom section. Mintage: 232,960. Minted Years: 1841, 1844, 1851, 1858 and 1861 (1841, 1858 and 1861 also exits in Proof). Engraver: William Wyon (Victoria's portrait side). The displayed coin is Type I.

Note: There are three die varieties for this coin consisting of three obverse dies paired with two reverse dies. One die has striations.

  • Type I: The 18 in the date has been slightly repunched. The letters of BRITANNIAR are clear and distinct. The E in REGINA has been repunched. The spacing between the numeral "2" and the rim is 0.63 mm.
  • Type II: Both the ones in the date have been repunched.  The IT of BRITANNIAR is repunched.
    Striations are also visible. The spacing between the numeral "2" and the rim is 0.63 mm.
  • Type III: In addition to the eight, both the ones in the date have been slightly repunched.
    Multiple letters have been repunched including the BRITA of BRITANNIAR. The spacing between the numeral "2" and the rim is 0.90 mm.
 
1844
 

KM#3 113 Shilling. Year: 1844. Weight: 17.42g [17.456g]. Metal: Copper. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 34.15 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Victoria portrait facing left in the center. "VICTORIA D:G: BRITANNIAR: REGINA F:D:" written around her. "W. W." incuse written at her truncation. Date written at the bottom. Reverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "113 OF A SHILLING." written at the bottom section. Mintage: 145,600. Minted Years: 1841, 1844, 1851, 1858, 1861 and 1865 (all dates also exists in Proof but 1865 only exists in Proofs). Engraver: William Wyon (Victoria's portrait side). The displayed coin is Type I.

Note: There are three varieties for this coin.

  • Type I: The spacing between the fours in the date is 0.20 mm known as narrow date. The bar in the fraction 1⁄13 has a nominal length.
  • Type II: The spacing between the fours in the date is 0.40 mm known as wide date. The bar in the fraction 1⁄13 has a nominal length.
  • Type III: The spacing between the fours in the date is 0.40 mm known as wide date. The bar in the fraction 1⁄13 has a long length.

As with several other Jersey coins, there seems to be a difference of opinion on the correct mintage figures for the Jersey 1844 penny. In his book, The Coins of the British Commonwealth of Nations Part 1, European Territories, Major F. Pridmore states that the mintage of the 1844 Jersey one thirteenth of a shilling as 27,040. The 1841 had 116,480 coins minted, while the other issues each had a mintage of 173,333. This would make the 1844 the key of the series. Krause and other leading publications have repeated these numbers. However, according to Royal Mint documents, the correct mintage figure of 1844 coin is 145,600.

 
1858
 

Same as KM#3 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1858. Weight: 16.96g [17.456g]. Mintage: 173,333 + N/A Proof. The displayed coin is Type IV.

Note:  For the 1/13 Shilling 1858, there are five types.

  • Type I: The spacing between the eight and the five in the date is 0.61 mm. The one in the date has been significantly repunched. The one has been repunched over a small one.
  • Type II: The spacing between the eight and the five in the date is 0.77 mm. In fraction 1⁄13, the one has been repunched multiple times and the three has also been repunched.
  • Type III: Same as Type II. Striations are present (vertical lines from the hair knot parallel to the neck).
  • Type IV: The spacing between the eight and the five in the date is 0.61 mm. In fraction 1⁄13, the one has been repunched multiple times and the three has also been repunched.
  • Type V: Same as Type IV. Striations are present (vertical lines from the hair knot parallel to the neck).
 
1866
 

KM#4 126 Shilling. Year: 1866. Weight: 4.65g. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 24.25 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Victoria portrait facing left in the center. "VICTORIA D. G. BRITANNIAR. REGINA F. D." written around her. Date written at the bottom. Reverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "ONE TWENTY-SIXTH OF A SHILLING." written at the bottom section. Mintage: 173,333 + N/A Proof. Minted Years: 1866, 1870 and 1871 (all dates also exits in Proofs as well). Engraver: Leonard Charles Wyon (Victoria's portrait side).

The displayed coin is Type I.
Note:  For the 1/26 Shilling 1866, there are three types.
  • Type I: The spacing between the sixes in the date is 0.66 mm.
  • Type II: Same as Type I, but with striations (vertical lines from the hair knot parallel to the neck).
  • Type III: The spacing between the sixes in the date is 0.48 mm.

The weight of this coin corresponds with the English bronze halfpenny but the size is 1.2 mm smaller. There are no initials of the designer on the truncation. The denomination now appears as words instead of a fraction. There are several die cracks on some of the dies used for the 1866 issue, Striations are visible on the obverse of the 1866 and 1870 issues due to die clashing. On the 1871 issue, the leopards have incuse spots and the shield is redecorated. Most 1871 coins are weakly struck.

The displayed coin is Type I.
KM#5 113 Shilling. Year: 1866. Weight: 9.45g. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 29.35 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Victoria portrait facing left in the center. "VICTORIA D. G. BRITANNIAR. REGINA F. D." written around her. Date written at the bottom. Reverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "ONE THIRTEENTH OF A SHILLING." written at the bottom section. Mintage: 173,333 + N/A Proof. Minted Years: 1866, 1870 and 1871 (all dates also exits in Proofs as well). Engraver: Leonard Charles Wyon (Victoria's portrait side).

Note:  For the 1/13 Shilling 1866, there are five types.

  • Type I: The spacing between the sixes in the date is 0.95 mm. The sixes are in alignment. A die crack is visible before the date.
  • Type II: Same as Type I, but with striations.
  • Type III: The spacing between the sixes in the date is 0.88 mm. The digits have been repunched.
  • Type IV: The spacing between the sixes in the date is 0.76 mm.
  • Type V: The spacing between the sixes in the date is 0.67 mm. Last six is in a more upright position. A strong die crack is visible above "EE" in THIRTEENTH.

Although the weight corresponds with the English bronze penny, the size is 1.6 mm smaller. Unlike the one twenty-sixth of a shilling coin, the initials of L.C.W. for Leonard Charles Wyon are incused on the truncation. The denomination now appears as a word instead of a fraction. Striations are visible on the obverse of all three coins. On some varieties of the 1870 issue, many items are repunched. There are two varieties for the 1866 proof coin, with and without LCW on the bust.

 
1870
As for the old copper coins, an act, dated January 29, 1869, ordered their withdrawal for recoining into the new bronze coins. The metal content of bronze coins is 95% copper, 4% tin, and 1% zinc. The legend on the reverse is now divided by stops (not colons). The coinages of 1870 and 1871 were minted from the metal obtained from the old withdrawn copper coins.

Same as KM#4 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1870. Weight: 4.71g. Mintage: 173,333 + N/A Proof.

The displayed coin is Type V.
Note:  For the 1/26 Shilling 1870, there are six types.
  • Type 1: The spacing between the eight and the seven in the date is 0.61 mm. The spacing between the seven and the zero in the date is 0.64 mm. The eight is slightly higher than the seven.
  • Type II: Same as Type 1, but with striations.
  • Type III: The spacing between the eight and the seven in the date is 0.81 mm. The spacing between the seven and the zero in the date is 0.70 mm. The eight and the seven are in nice alignment. The eight has been slightly repunched. The F.D. has been repunched.
  • Type IV: Same as Type III, but with striations.
  • Type V: The spacing between the eight and the seven in the date is 0.53 mm. The spacing between the seven and the zero in the date is 0.57 mm. The eight is slightly higher than the seven. The seven has been slightly repunched.
  • Type VI: The spacing between the eight and the seven in the date is 0.70 mm. The spacing between the seven and the zero in the date is 0.56 mm. The eight and the seven are in nice alignment.

In The Standard Catalog of World Coins, Krause states the mintages for both the half penny (1/26 Shilling) and penny (1/13 Shilling) for 1870 and 1871 as 160,000. Unfortunately, Krause used 12 pence to the shilling instead of the correct 13 pence to the shilling to compute their numbers. Pridmore, Marshall-Fraser, and McCammon all agree that the correct number should be 173,333.

 
 
Monetary standard 1877-1970: Jersey Pound (JEP) = 4 Crowns = 20 Shillings = 240 pence.  British Pound (GBP) coins and banknotes are also used along with Jersey Pound.
It was during this time, that the merchants of Jersey were getting frustrated with having 13 pence to the shilling instead of the English standard of 12 pence to the shilling. Following the act of February 25, 1876, Jersey coinage would be denominated as a 12th, 24th, and 48th of a shilling following the English standard. The new coins of 1877 are the same size, although not the same weight as their English counterparts. The obverse has a dexter coroneted bust of Queen Victoria, with a seven pointed star with the legend “VICTORIA D. G. BRITANNIAR. REGINA F.D.” The legend in English is “Victoria, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith.” Leonard Charles Wyon engraved both the obverse and the reverse of the new coin. The Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury on March 15, 1870 recommended to the States whether advantage should be taken at this time to assimilate the bronze coinage of Jersey with that of the United Kingdom. On March 31, 1870 the response was that the “States of the Island are not disposed to change the nominal value of their copper coinage.” Finally on February 25, 1876, at act passed stating that Jersey coinage would be denominated as a 12th, 24th, and 48th of a shilling following the English standard. The old coins based upon 13 pence to the shilling were demonetized on December 31, 1876.
 
1877
While working on the reverse, L. C. Wyon wrote to the Royal Mint on November 4, 1876, concerned about the missing spots on the beasts. Were the beasts lions or leopards? The Bailiff assured the Royal Mint in a November 07, 1876 letter that the leopards on the previous coins were a mistake and the animals were actually lions. However, the Bailiff was incorrect about the nature of these cats. Some understanding of heraldry is necessary for any numismatist, especially regarding tinctures (colors). Vertical lines are red (gules) and dots are gold (yellow). Thus on the older coins, we have passant, guardant, yellow lions on a red shield. Mr. Wyon, based upon the Bailiff's directions, updated the shield from “leopards” to “lions” by removing the dots. He did keep the lines on the shield. The shield itself is a heater shape shield and it divides the date. The wording “STATES OF JERSEY” is around the upper half of the reverse, with the denomination around the lower half. This design lasted until 1923, when a square shield, in addition with scrolls, was restored.

Things to note about this series:
  • The Coinage Committee changed the original order of £1,000 in pennies, £500 in half pennies, and £500 in farthings to £1,000 in pennies, £700 in half pennies, and £300 in farthings.
  • In 1877 the coins were not minted by the British Royal Mint but by the private Heaton Mint (later known as the Birmingham Mint). However, the Royal Mint did engrave the dies for the coins. These coins are the only Jersey coins with a mint mark. It is of interest that in 1877, the Heaton Mint minted coins for Hong Kong, Mauritius, and Jersey.
  • The 1888 mintage was authorized on January 16, 1888 and confirmed by Order in Council on March 17, 1888. The act authorized £2,000 nominal value worth of coins; half of which was delivered in 1888. The remaining £1,000 was supplied in 1894. The new shield design, known as heater-shaped, is the earliest shape used for armorial purposes.
 

KM#7 124 Shilling. Year: 1877. Weight: 5.60g [5.60g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Heaton. Obverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey pointed shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "ONE TWENTY-FOURTH OF A SHILLING." written at the bottom section.
Reverse: Queen Victoria portrait facing left in the center. "VICTORIA D. G. BRITANNIAR. REGINA F. D." written around her. "H" mint mark written below the truncation of Queen Victoria. "*" 7-pointed star at the bottom. Mintage: 336,000 + N/A Proof. Minted Years: 1877 (in Proof only), 1877H (also exists in Proof), 1888 and 1894 (also exists in Proof). Engraver: Leonard Charles Wyon (both sides). The displayed coin is Type V.

Note:  For the 1/24 Shilling 1877, there are eight types. Each has the H mint mark in a different location. Also note the alignment and the various repunched letters of BRITANNIAR for each type.

  • Type 1: The star is oddly shaped. The second N in BRITANNIAR has been repunched.
  • Type II: Same as Type 1, but striations are visible.
  • Type III: The H mintmark is centered and is in a low position. The A and the I in BRITANNIAR have been repunched.
  • Type IV: The H mintmark is centered. The BR in BRITANNIAR has been repunched.
  • Type V: The H mintmark is centered and is in a high position. No letters repunched in BRITANNIAR.
  • Type VI: The star is missing a ray at the right side. No letters repunched in BRITANNIAR.
  • Type VII: The H mintmark is very close to the D. No letters repunched in BRITANNIAR.
  • Type VIII: The H mintmark is low and is very close to D. No letters repunched in BRITANNIAR.

Like all 1877 coins, the Royal Mint engraved the dies. The Heaton mint of Birmingham undertook the production of the 1877 coinage and added the familiar H mint mark.

KM#8 112 Shilling. Year: 1877. Weight: 9.18g [9.50g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Heaton. Obverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey pointed shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "ONE TWELFTH OF A SHILLING." written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Victoria portrait facing left in the center. "VICTORIA D. G. BRITANNIAR. REGINA F. D." written around her. "H" mint mark written below the truncation of Queen Victoria. "*" 7-pointed star at the bottom. Mintage: 240,000 + N/A Proof. Minted Years: 1877 (in Proof only), 1877H (also exists in Proof), 1881, 1888 and 1894 (also exists in Proof). Engraver: Leonard Charles Wyon (both sides). The displayed coin is Type V. There are 139 denticles on Victoria's portrait side.

Note: There are five varieties for the 1/12 Shilling 1877 H. There are two different sizes of the H mint mark. For each size of mint mark, there are coins with and without striations.

  • Type I: The mintmark is a large H. The Dot besides D are inline with the based of mintmark H.

  • Type II: Same as Type 1 but with striations.

  • Type III: The mintmark is a small H. The Dot besides D are inline with the based of mintmark H.

  • Type IV: Same as Type III but with striations.

  • Type V: The mintmark is a small H, but the H in higher position relative to the period.

For the 1877 H issue, the “A” in “STATES” was weakly cut. On some examples of the 1877H and the 1888 one twelfth of a shilling coins, striations are visible on the obverse due to die clashing.

 
1881
 

Same as KM#8 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1881. Weight: 9.45g [9.50g]. Mint: British Royal Mint. Mintage: 75,153. The displayed coin is Type II.

Note: There are two varieties for the 1/12 Shilling 1881.

  • Type I: The top left ray of the star is broken. The date digits "81" is at lower position with respect to the N in SHILLING.

  • Type II: The top left ray of the star is broken. The date digits "81" is on same position with respect to the N in SHILLING.

This broken ray can also be seen on the 1877 Proof only Royal Mint issue and the 1888 issue.

 
1888
 

Same as KM#7 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1888. Weight: 5.60g [5.60g]. Mint: British Royal Mint. Mintage: 120,000. 

The displayed coin is Type III.

Note: For the 1888 half penny there are six varieties. Differences can be located by checking for repunched letters and comparing the alignment of the letters of BRITANNIAR. For the reverse dies there are differences in the spacing in the date.

  • Type 1: BRITANNIAR is aligned. Repunched first I; Slightly raised T. The spacing between the eights in the date is 0.60 mm.
  • Type II: BRITANNIAR is misaligned. T has a crooked top. Striations are present. The spacing between the eights in the date is 0.39 mm.
  • Type III: BRITANNIAR is misaligned with a slightly repunched first R. T has a crooked top. The spacing between the eights in the date is 0.39 mm.
  • Type IV: BRITANNIAR is aligned with a strongly repunched first R. The spacing between the eights in the date is 0.39 mm.
  • Type V: BRITANNIAR is misaligned with a low T. The spacing between the eights in the date is 0.39 mm.
  • Type VI: BRITANNIAR is aligned with a significantly repunched R. The V and R in Victoria has been repunched. The spacing between the eights in the date is 0.39 mm.

Same as KM#8 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1888. Weight: 9.27g [9.50g]. Mint: British Royal Mint. Mintage: 180,000. The displayed coin is Type III.

Note: For the 1888 Penny there are seven varieties.

  • Type I: The top left ray of the star is broken. The spacing between the eight and the letter N is 1.32 mm. The spacing between the digits "88" is 0.40 mm. The 88 is misalgined; last 8 is higher and far from N in SHILLING.
  • Type II: The top left ray of the star is broken. The spacing between the eight and the letter N is 1.01 mm. The spacing between the digits "88" is 0.49 mm. The 88 is misalgined; last 8 is higher and close to N in SHILLING.
  • Type III: The top left ray of the star is broken. The spacing between the eight and the letter N is 1.32 mm. The spacing between the digits "88" is 0.37 mm. The 88 is well aligned at the same height.
  • Type IV: same as Type III, but striations are also visible.
  • Type V: The top left ray of the star is reworked and striations are visible. The spacing between the eight and the letter N is 1.32 mm. The spacing between the digits "88" is 0.42 mm. The 88 is slightly out of alignment.
  • Type VI: The top left ray of the star is complete. The spacing between the eight and the letter N is 1.32 mm. The spacing between the digits "88" is 0.42 mm. The 88 is slightly out of alignment.
  • Type VII: The top left ray of the star is complete. The spacing between the eight and the letter N is 1.38 mm. The spacing between the digits "88" is 0.42 mm. The 88 is is slightly above relative to the letter N.

There seems to be a difference of opinion on the correct mintage of various Jersey coins. For this grouping, the Jersey 1888 penny and half penny figures are in question. Krause and Pridmore state the mintages as 180,000 for the penny and 120,000 for the half penny. McCammon's and Marshall-Fraser's numbers are 195,000 and 130,000. In 1888, £750 of pennies and £250 of half pennies were ordered from the Royal Mint. Their numbers are computed based upon the old 13 pence to the shilling instead of the correct 12 pence to the shilling. In 1887 French bronze coins were once again declared not to be legal tender in Jersey. On some examples of the 1877 H and the 1888 one twenty-fourth of a shilling coins, striations are visible on the obverse due to die clashing.
Proofs exist for the 1877, 1877H, and 1894 coins.

 
1894
 

Same as KM#8 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1894. Weight: 9.32g [9.50g]. Mint: British Royal Mint. Mintage: 180,000 + N/A Proofs. The displayed coin is Type III.

Note: For the 1884 Penny there are four varieties.

  • Type I: The spacing between the nine and the four in the date is 0.47 mm. The spacing between the four and the letter N is 0.77 mm.
  • Type II: The spacing between the nine and the four in the date is 0.47 mm. The spacing between the four and the letter N is 0.53 mm.
  • Type III: The spacing between the nine and the four in the date is 0.47 mm. The spacing between the four and the letter N is 0.64 mm. The date is in a high position compared to the N. The nine has been repunched.
  • Type IV: The spacing between the nine and the four in the date is 0.31 mm (very close). The spacing between the four and the letter N is 0.80 mm.

Same as KM#8 mentioned above, but in dark brown colour. Weight: 9.17g [9.50g].

The displayed coin is Type IV.

 
 
Edward VII Coinage 1909
There were only two coin issues for Jersey during the reign of Edward VII, both minted in 1909, the penultimate year of his reign. The obverse has a bust of the King in full coronation regalia and the legend “EDWARD VII KING & EMPEROR.” The bust on the obverse was modeled and engraved by George William De Saulles, the Royal Mint's Chief Engraver from 1893 to 1903. The reverse of each coin features the same design as the one appeared during Queen Victoria's reign. Although this basic design had been used for Jersey's badge of arms for centuries, it was only in 1907 that King Edward VII gave royal permission for the Crest to be used as Jersey's official motif. The letters “DES” for George William De Saulles can be found beneath the truncation. The obverse legend occurs in English, as opposed to Latin. There is recognition that the Monarch is Emperor of India. Some of the old coinage was returned to the Royal Mint for melting to be used for this issue and probably accounts for the streaky appearance on some of the coins.
 

KM#9 124 Shilling. Year: 1909. Weight: 5.81g [5.60g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.55 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey pointed shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "ONE TWENTY-FOURTH OF A SHILLING." written at the bottom section.
Reverse: King Edward VII's portrait facing right in the center. "EDWARD VII" written on left side clockwise and "KING & EMPEROR" written on right side clockwise. There are only seven dots below the orb in the center of the crown. Mintage: 120,000. Minted Years: One year type. Engraver: George William de Saulles (Edward VII's portrait side) and Leonard Charles Wyon (Value side). The displayed coin is Type II.

Note: For the 1909 half penny there are two varieties. The difference is in the placement of the date.

  • Type I: The date is a lower position with respect to second "I" in SHILLING. The zero in the date has been repunched.
  • Type II: The date is a higher position with respect to second "I" in SHILLING. The "U" in FOURTH has been repunched.

KM#10 112 Shilling. Year: 1909. Weight: 9.37g [9.40g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.90 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey pointed shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "ONE TWELFTH OF A SHILLING." written at the bottom section. Reverse: King Edward VII's portrait facing right in the center. "EDWARD VII" written on left side clockwise and "KING & EMPEROR" written on right side clockwise. Mintage: 180,000. Minted Years: One year type. Engraver: George William de Saulles (Edward VII's portrait side) and Leonard Charles Wyon (Value side).

Note: This coin has only one variety. There are eight dots below the orb in the center of the crown. The letters “FTH” in “TWELFTH” are out of alignment.

 
 
George V Coinage (1911-1935)
During the reign of George V, for their coins Jersey had one obverse design and three reverse designs. The bust on the obverse was modeled and engraved by Edgar Bertram Mackennal. As typical for the times, this design appears on other Colonial coinages. The Royal Style and Titles of His Majesty King George V in Latin were “GEORGIVS V D[EI] G[RATIA] BRIT[ANNIARUM] [ET TERRARUM TRANSMARINARUM QUAE IN DITONE SUNT BRITANNICA REX], F[IDEI] D[EFENSOR] IND[IAE] IMP[ERATOR].” Or in English, “George V, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India.” In the correct Latin form the rendering was too long to be suitable for coinage and the Latin abbreviation “OMN[IUM]” takes the place of the words “ET TERRARUM TRANSMARINARUM QUAE IN DITONE SUNT BRITANNICA.” On these coins, the spelling “BRITT” for “BRITANNIARUM” is correct. Of special interest is the 1933 penny, which has two interesting obverse die varieties. These varieties are described later in this section. Because there was a coin shortage during World War I, French coins gradually infiltrated the island and were accepted for change. On February 7, 1923 the States passed a law to ban the import of foreign copper coinage in sums exceeding one shilling. This law was confirmed by Order in Council March 12, 1923 and registered in the Royal Court April 7, 1923. The States then proceeded to take steps to remove French copper coinage from circulation. On August 2, 1923, the States authorised the Finance Committee to exchange French copper coins for Jersey copper coins. Between August 27 and September 8, the Treasury carried out at their office the exchange of 1 and 2 sous French coins for Jersey half penny and penny coins and placed advertisements in the press to that effect with an additional reminder that French coinage remained not legal tender. Approximately 500,000 French coins were recalled and sent to the Royal Mint for production of new coinage. A new design was desired for this recoinage and the States suggested adding a star to the reverse. George Kruger-Gray, the Royal Mint designer suggested two designs. The first design depicted William the Conqueror on horseback. The second design was a modification of the coat of arms and was adopted. Since they were struck in late 1923, the new coins did not enter into circulation until 1924. McCammon states that because of the metal content, these new coins are typically darker than other Jersey coins. In contrast, I have several mint state 1923 coins and they are brilliantly red-orange. In 1930, the States once again requested the Royal Mint to supply a new design for the reverse of the Jersey coinage. Once again Mr. Kruger-Gray was commissioned to prepare the design and his basic shield design was so popular that it lasted until a complete redesign of the coinage appeared in the 1980s. George Kruger Gray was a designer, painter, and medallist was a Royal College of Art graduate who designed mostly reverses which he signed "KG" or "G". Kruger's real name was George Edward Kruger. After his marriage in 1918 he adopted his wife's surname.
 
1923
 

KM#13 124 Shilling. Year: 1923. Weight: 5.61g [5.60g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.55 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey pointed shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "ONE TWENTYFOURTH OF A SHILLING" written at the bottom section.
Reverse: George V's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS V D.G.BRITT: OMN:REX F.D.IND:IMP:" written around him. Dot at the bottom. Mintage: 72,000. Minted Years: 1923 and 1926 (both dates also exists in Proofs as well). Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Edgar Bertram Mackennal (George V's protrait side).

Note: For the 1923 half penny there is only one die variety. The order for the 1926 half pence started on March 3, 1926 and was completed on March 17, 1926 at a cost to the Royal Mint of £58/15/9.The spelling of the denomination is now “ONE TWENTYFOURTH OF A SHILLING” instead of “ONE TWENTY-FOURTH OF A SHILLING.”.

KM#12 112 Shilling. Year: 1923. Weight: 9.34g [9.50g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.85 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES OF JERSEY." written in the top section. Jersey pointed shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "ONE TWELFTH OF A SHILLING." written at the bottom section. Reverse: George V's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS V D.G.BRITT: OMN:REX F.D.IND:IMP:" written around him. Dot at the bottom. Mintage: 204,000. Minted Years: 1911, 1913 and 1923. Engraver: Leonard Charles Wyon (Jersey shield side) and Edgar Bertram Mackennal (George V's protrait side). The displayed coin is Type III.

Note: For the 1923 One penny there are three varieties. The difference is the placement of the date.

  • Type 1: The spacing between the one and the nine in the date is 0.62 mm. The one and the nine are in alignment. Most specimens have a die crack in front of the S in STATES.
  • Type 2: The spacing between the one and the nine in the date is 0.70 mm. Most specimens have a die crack beneath the N in ONE. The nine has a slightly higher position relative to the one.
  • Type 3: The spacing between the one and the nine in the date is 0.75 mm. The nine has a slightly lower position relative to the one.

KM#14 112 Shilling. Year: 1923. Weight: 9.41g [9.50g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.80 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES·OF·JERSEY" written in banner at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "ONE·TWELFTH·OF·A·SHILLING" written in banner at the bottom section. Reverse: George V's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS V D. G. BRITT: OMN: REX F. D. IND: IMP:" written around him. Dot at the bottom. Mintage: 301,200. Minted Years: 1923 and 1926. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Edgar Bertram Mackennal (George V's protrait side).

Note: For the 1923 One penny there is only one die variety.

If you review the Royal Mint documents concerning the 1923 and 1926 issues, you will determine the reason for the mintage of only 82,800 coins for the 1926 penny. On October 31, 1922 the States authorize an issue of copper coins to not exceed £3000. Using recalled French coins, the Royal Mint produced £1255 in pence and £150 in halfpence. Three years later the States requested, “whether it would be possible to have minted £595 of Jersey Copper similar to that of 1923. This amount represents the balance of £3000. However doing the math £1255+£150+£595 = £2000 and not £3000. It seems that the Finance Committee of the States of Jersey didn't do their math correctly. The 1926 Jersey penny (1/12 Shilling) is one of the key coins of this series because of a math error! The order for the 1926 pence started on February 24, 1926 and was completed on March 10, 1926 at a cost to the Royal Mint of £82/4/6..

 
1931
 

KM#15 124 Shilling. Year: 1931. Weight: 5.63g [5.60g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.55 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "·ONE TWENTYFOURTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section.
Reverse: George V's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS V D. G. BRITT: OMN: REX F. D. IND: IMP:" written around him. Dot at the bottom. Mintage: 204,000 + N/A Proofs. Minted Years: 1931, 1933 and 1935 (all dates also exits in Proofs). Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Edgar Bertram Mackennal (George V's protrait side).

Note: For the 1931 half penny there is only one die variety. The order for the 1931 half pence started on May 27, 1931 and was completed on June 03, 1931 at a cost to the Royal Mint of £92/11/2.

KM#16 112 Shilling. Year: 1931. Weight: 9.29g [9.50g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.80 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "·ONE·TWELFTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: George V's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS V D. G. BRITT: OMN: REX F. D. IND: IMP:" written around him. Dot at the bottom. Mintage: 204,000 + N/A Proofs. Minted Years: 1931, 1933 and 1935 (all dates also exits in Proofs). Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Edgar Bertram Mackennal (George V's protrait side). There are 177 denticles on George V's portrait side.

Note: For the 1931 One penny there is only one die variety. The order for the 1931 pence started on May 13, 1931 and was completed on June 03, 1931 at a cost to the Royal Mint of £224/6/8.

 
1933
 

KM#16 112 Shilling. Year: 1933. Weight: 9.56g [9.50g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.80 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "·ONE·TWELFTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: George V's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS V D. G. BRITT: OMN: REX F. D. IND: IMP:" written around him. Dot at the bottom. Mintage: 204,000 + N/A Proofs. Minted Years: 1931, 1933 and 1935. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Edgar Bertram Mackennal (George V's protrait side). The displayed coin has 177 denticles.

There are two types:

  • Type I: 177 (London) denticles (circular dots) at the border on George V's portrait side.
  • Type II: 178 (Calcutta) denticles (circular dots) at the border on George V's portrait side.

Note:

  • The order for the 1933 half pence started on December 20, 1933 and was completed on January 03, 1934 at a cost to the Royal Mint of £51/19/11.
  • The order for the 1933 One penny started on December 20, 1933 and was completed on January 03, 1934 at a cost to the Royal Mint of £202/19/11. The 1933 issue includes the well known “English” and “Indian” obverse dies of George V pennies.
 
1935
 

KM#16 112 Shilling. Year: 1935. Weight: 9.27g [9.50g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.80 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "·ONE·TWELFTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: George V's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS V D. G. BRITT: OMN: REX F. D. IND: IMP:" written around him. Dot at the bottom. Mintage: 204,000 + N/A Proofs. Minted Years: 1931, 1933 and 1935. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Edgar Bertram Mackennal (George V's protrait side). There are 177 denticles on George V's portrait side. The displayed coin is Type II.

There are two types:

  • Type I: The spacing between the three and the five in the date is 0.58 mm.
  • Type II: The spacing between the three and the five in the date is 0.34 mm.

Note:

  • The order for the 1935 half pence started on June 19, 1935 and was completed on July 12, 1935 at a cost to the Royal Mint of £51/1/2.
  • The order for the 1935 pence started on June 12, 1935 and was completed on July 12, 1935 at a cost to the Royal Mint of £198/13/2.
 
 
George VI Coinage (1937-1947)
Both Edward VII and George V were shown on the previous coins of Jersey in full coronation regalia, whereas the George VI coins uses only a crowned head. Beneath the truncation, the initials of Percy Metcalfe, CVO, can be found. For the 1937, 1946, and the 1947 coins, the reverse design was a continuation of the last King's coinage and the George Kruger-Gray's initials can be found there. There were three types of coins issued during the reign of George VI, a half penny type and two different penny types. After the war, Jersey's first commemorative coin, a one twelfth of a shilling, was released in memory of the liberation of the island.
There were two different effigies of the King used on Colonial coins. British Honduras, East Africa, and Jersey used the second type of effigy in 1937, the lower relief variety, which was more suitable for coinage. Jersey first commemorative coin was issued during the reign of King George VI. This commemorative issue owes its existence to Mr. J. Wilfrid du Pre of the Societe Jersiaise. In 1949, the coins were first minted for the anniversary of the Liberation of the Island from the German Occupation on May 8, 1945. When India became independent in 1947, the King gave up his title of Emperor of India (IND IMP) and this title was removed from coins as seen on this undated commemorative coin. These coins were also minted in 1950 and 1952. On this coin, the title of the island is “ISLAND OF JERSEY.”
 
1937
 

KM#17 124 Shilling. Year: 1937. Weight: 5.45g [5.60g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.55 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "·ONE TWENTYFOURTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section.
Reverse: George VI's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS VI D·G·BRITT·OMN·REX F·D·IND·IMP:" written around him. "PM" written below the truncation of George VI. Mintage: 72,000 + N/A Proofs. Minted Years: 1937, 1946 and 1947 (Proofs also exist for all three years). Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Percy Metcalfe (George VI's protrait side). For the 1937 half penny there is only one die variety.

Note: After 70 years of production, 1947 was the last time that a one twenty-fourth of a shilling was minted.

KM#18 112 Shilling. Year: 1937. Weight: 9.55g [9.40g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.80 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "·ONE·TWELFTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: George VI's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS VI D·G·BRITT·OMN·REX F·D·IND·IMP:" written around him. "PM" written below the truncation of George VI. Mintage: 204,000 + N/A Proofs. Minted Years: 1937, 1946 and 1947. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Percy Metcalfe (George VI's protrait side). There are 178 denticles on George V's portrait side. The displayed coin is Type II.

There are two types:

  • Type I: The spacing between the three and the seven in the date is 0.58 mm.
  • Type II: The spacing between the three and the seven in the date is 0.37 mm.

Note: The order for the 1937 pence started on November 03, 1937 and was completed on November 17, 1937 at a cost to the Royal Mint of £199/6/10.

 
1946
 

KM#18 112 Shilling. Year: 1946. Weight: 9.55g [9.40g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.80 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "STATES·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "·ONE·TWELFTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: George VI's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS VI D·G·BRITT·OMN·REX F·D·IND·IMP:" written around him. "PM" written below the truncation of George VI. Mintage: 204,000 + N/A Proofs. Minted Years: 1937, 1946 and 1947. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Percy Metcalfe (George VI's protrait side). There are 177 denticles on George VI's portrait side. For the 1946 One penny there is only one die variety.
 
1947
 

Same as KM#18 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1947. Weight: 9.62g [9.50g]. Mint: British Royal Mint. Mintage: 444,000 + N/A Proofs. The displayed coin is Type II.

There are three types:

  • Type I: The spacing between the four and the seven in the date is 0.70 mm.
  • Type II: The spacing between the four and the seven in the date is 0.59 mm.
  • Type III: The seven with respect to the four is at a higher position than the previous types.
 
ND (1949)
 

KM#19 112 Shilling. Year: ND (1949). Weight: 9.47g [9.50g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.80 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "ISLAND·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. "ONE TWELFTH OF A SHILLING" written below the shield in circular form. "·LIBERATED 1945·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: George VI's portrait facing left in the center. "GEORGIVS VI DEI GRA:BRITT.OMN:REX FID:DEF:" written around him. "PM" written below the truncation of George VI. Mintage: 1,200,000. Minted Years: One year type (. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Percy Metcalfe (George VI's protrait side).

Note: This commemorative issue owes its existence to Mr. J. Wilfrid du Pre of the Societe Jersiaise. In 1949, the coins were first minted for the anniversary of the Liberation of the Island from the German Occupation on May 09, 1945. The same coin were also minted in 1950 and 1952. When India became independent in 1947, the King gave up his title of Emperor of India (IND IMP) and this title was removed from coins For this issue, there is only one die variety.

 
 
Elizabeth II old Coinage (1954-1966)
Although one twenty fourth of a shilling coins were not minted during Queen Elizabeth's reign, Jersey issued various coins including two new denominations: a one fourth of a shilling and a five shillings crown. During this time, three commemorative one twelfth of a shilling coins were also struck. These were the Island Liberation issue, the 300th Anniversary of Accession of King Charles II issue, and the 900th Anniversary of the Norman Conquest commemorative issue. Two other denominations were also struck for this occasion: a five shillings coin and a one fourth of a shilling coin. The obverse depicts Cecil Thomas' famous crowned portrait of the H.M. Queen Elizabeth II. This design also appears on the coins from Belize, Bermuda, British Eastern Caribbean Territories, British Honduras, British West Africa, Cyprus, East Africa, Fiji, Ghana, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Malaya and British Borneo, Mauritius, Nigeria, and Seychelles. The obverse has a simple legend of “QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND.” The reverse of each coin is a slight modification of Kruger-Gray's shield design. The amount of coins minted during the Queen's reign surpassed the amount minted for all the other entire monarchs combined. Proof sets were minted for collectors in 1957, 1960, 1964, and 1966.
 
ND (1954)
 

KM#20 112 Shilling. Year: ND (1954). Weight: 9.38g [9.40g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.80 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "ISLAND·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. "ONE TWELFTH OF A SHILLING" written below the shield in circular form. "·LIBERATED 1945·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: 720,000 + N/A Proof. Minted Years: One year type. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Cecil Thomas (Elizabeth II's protrait side).

Note: The Coinage Act of 1951 and the Coinage Act of 1953 authorized this coinage. This issue was minted in 1954. Although the Coinage Act of 1953 authorized the issue of one twenty-fourth of a shilling coins, none were minted.

 
1957
 

KM#21 112 Shilling. Year: 1957. Weight: 9.44g [9.40g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.80 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "·ONE·TWELFTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: 720,000 + 2,100 Proof. Minted Years: 1957 and 1964. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Cecil Thomas (Elizabeth II's protrait side).

Note: In 1957 the coinage was re-designed with a couple of minor but important changes. Since there were adverse comments on the Queen's name appearing upside down, the effigy is now smaller and moved downward, while the legend is now centered around the top. For the reverse, the title of the Island is now “THE BAILIWICK OF JERSEY.” This modified effigy design was intended solely for use in Jersey. The colonial territories using the crowned effigy continued to use the standard design. The Coinage Act of 1956 authorized the 1957 issue. The Coinage Act of 1964 authorized the 1964 issue.

KM#22 14 Shilling (3 pence). Year: 1960. Weight: 4.78g [4.65g]. Metal: Nickel-Brass. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 21.10 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "·ONE·FOURTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section.
Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: 2,000,000 + 3,600 Proofs. Minted Years: 1957 and 1960 (in Proofs only). Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Cecil Thomas (Elizabeth II's protrait side).

Note: One fourth of a shilling coins were legal for a payment of an amount not exceeding two shillings. Similar to the 1960 penny, the total mintage for the proof coins is 3,600. Most sources report a mintage of 4,200 for this proof only issue which is incorrect.

 
1960
 

KM#23 112 Shilling. Year: 1960. Weight: 9.45g [9.40g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.80 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. "CIIR 1660-1960 EIIR" written below the Jersey shield. "·ONE·TWELFTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: 1,200,000 + 3,600 Proofs. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: 300th Anniversary of the Accession of Charles II. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Cecil Thomas (Elizabeth II's protrait side). There are 174 denticles on Elizabeth II's portrait side.

Note: After the execution of Charles I in 1649, Jersey was the first place to proclaim his son King Charles II. (It was not until the end of the English Civil War in 1660, that he was actually crowned king in England.) On November 28, 1663, King Charles II presented to the Bailiff of Jersey the Royal Mace in gratitude for the loyalty and kindness he received during his two stays on the Island during the Civil War. The Royal Mace is considered by many as one of the finest maces of the 17th century. It consists of 11 pieces and is made of silver gilt. The mace is 4' 9.5" long and weighs over 237 ounces (14 pounds, 13 ounces). This coin commemorates his stay in Jersey.

The Coinage Act of 1961 authorized this coinage. In 1961 1,200 proof coins were made. A first order of 800 coins was completed by the end of February, while a second order of 400 coins was completed late in September. In 1962 1,000 proof coins were made. In 1963 1,400 proof coins were made. The total mintage for the proof coins is 3,600. Krause has reported mintage of 4,200 for this proof issue, and is incorrect.

Royal Mint accidentally used a wrong obverse die (legends below Queen Elizabeth II's protrait) when minting the 1960 proof sets. At first glance, the incorrect die appears to be the one used on the 1945 Liberation issue. However, the Royal Mint destroyed these dies when the new design was introduced in 1957. The incorrect die is a British Caribbean Territories two cents die. The British Caribbean Territories two cents coin was the only coin of the same size, weight and alloy of the Jersey penny and incidentally had the inscription below the effigy. The original coin has space at the bottom of Queen Elizabeth's portrait but the 2 cent Caribbean coin had space above Queen Elizabeth's portrait. Although proof specimens of the British Caribbean Territories two cents coin and the Jersey penny were struck at the Royal Mint in each of the years 1961, 1962, and 1963, there was only one time, viz. from August the 8th through the 22nd, 1961 when obverse dies of both coins were held in the coin processing room die store. Evidently it was during this time period when the Royal Mint manufactured eighteen two cents proof coins for the Mint Museum, which this die was inadvertently used for the Jersey coins. As for the number of coins produce, an exact number is impossible to determine. However, it would be reasonable to assume that some coins were produced after August 22 and until late September when the order was completed. Also, we can assume that some coins were produced before August 8 and that striking continued concurrently with the striking of the Caribbean two cents coins. These mule coins are a tiny sub-set of the total mintage and thus, this coin is a modern rarity.

 
1964
 

Same as KM#21, but...

Year: 1964. Weight: 9.53g [9.40g]. Mintage: 1,200,000 + 20,000 Proofs.

Same as above coin, but Produced in Proof. Weight: 9.39g [9.40g]. Mintage: 20,000.

KM#25 14 Shilling (3 pence). Year: 1964. Weight: 6.72g [6.80g]. Metal: Nickel-Brass. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 21.05 mm; Dodecagonal (12-sided). Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint.
Obverse: "BAILIWICK·OF·JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Date separated on both sides of the shield. "·ONE·FOURTH·OF·A·SHILLING·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: 1,200,000 + 20,00 Proofs. Minted Years: One year type. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Cecil Thomas (Elizabeth II's protrait side).
 
1966
 

KM#27 14 Shilling (3 pence). Year: 1964. Weight: 6.82g [6.80g]. Metal: Nickel-Brass. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 21.10 mm; Dodecagonal (12-sided). Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint.
Obverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Dates "1066" and "1966" separated on both sides of the shield. "ONE FOURTH OF A SHILLING" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: 1,200,000 + 30,00 Proofs. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: 900th Anniversary of the Norman Conquest / Battle of Hastings. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Cecil Thomas (Elizabeth II's protrait side).

KM#28 5 Shilling (60 pence or 1 crown or ¼ Pound). Year: 1964. Weight: 28.38g [28.47g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written in at the top section. Jersey shield (with three lions facing left) in the center. Dates "1066" and "1966" separated on both sides of the shield. "· FIVE SHILLINGS ·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around her. Mintage: 300,000 + 30,000 Proofs. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: 900th Anniversary of the Norman Conquest / Battle of Hastings. Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey shield side) and Cecil Thomas (Elizabeth II's protrait side).

Note: As early as August 21, 1964 the Treasurer of the States, F.N. Padgham, had contacted the Royal Mint concerning the production of this particular crown. The initial requirements were: pieces to be cupro-nickel, milled, same weight and size as U.K. crowns. Obverse and reverse designs to be similar to Jersey penny but with inscription “BAILIWICK OF JERSEY - FIVE SHILLINGS - 1066-1966”. 100,000 pieces for general circulation 30,000 pieces from polished dies were required. After reviewing two designs, the States on April 20, 1965, made two suggestion First, the States desired a decrease in the size of the shield since it was rather big. Second, the States requested the lettering to be similar to that of the 1870 penny (so much so that an 1870 penny was forwarded to the mint for review.) Of the two designs, the Royal Mint adapted sketch “B” with the two modifications. The first modification was to reverse the positions of “BAILIWICK OF JERSEY” and “FIVE SHILLINGS” so that the former was below the shield and the latter above it. The second modification was to slightly reduce the size of the lettering. The cost of a proof set to the States was 5/- for each coin and 3/6 for the case. Originally, the Mint quoted the States a price of 2/6d for each crown, however the States wanted a “Grade 4” coin versus a “Grade 3.” Per the Royal Mint documents, “It is essential that these proof coins should be acceptable in America and we are therefore agreeable to them being produced by the former method and are prepared to pay the extra price of 2/6d per coin.”2 In 1967 British dealers were selling the Jersey proof crown set for around £4. The cost of the general circulation issue was £40/10/0 per thousand. These coins were “going so well” that an additional 200,000 pieces were ordered on May 31, 1966.

 
 
Monetary standard: Currencies: Jersey Pound (JEP) = 100 pence. British Pound (GBP) coins and banknotes are also used along with Jersey Pound.
Along with the rest of the British Isles, Jersey decimalized in 1971 and began issuing a full series of circulating coins from ½p to 50p. £1 and £2 denominations followed later. This seven sided plain edge 50 pence coin was released to circulation on October 14, 1969. Half Penny coins were no longer legal tender after February 18, 1985. These larger diameter coin of 5 pence coins ceased to be legal tender after December 31, 1990. The larger diameter 10 pence coins ceased to be legal tender after June 30, 1993. The larger diameter 50 pence coin ceased to be legal tender after April 30, 1998.
 
Elizabeth II new Coinage (1968-date)
1968
Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray (Jersey COA side) and Arnold Machin (Elizabeth portrait side).

KM#32 5 pence. Year: 1968. Weight: 5.66g [5.65g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 23.60 mm. Thickness: 1.70 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "FIVE NEW PENCE" with date written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Mintage: 3,600,000. Minted Years: 1968 and 1980.

KM#33 10 Pence. Year: 1968. Weight: 11.13g  [11.31g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 28.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "TEN NEW PENCE" with date written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Mintage: 1,500,000. Minted Years: 1968, 1975 and 1980.
 
1969
 

KM#34 50 Pence. Year: 1969. Weight: 13.39g [13.50g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.00 mm; 7-sided. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "FIFTY NEW PENCE" written at the bottom section with Date. Mintage: 480,000. Minted Years: 1969 and 1980.

 
1971
 

KM#29 ½  penny. Year: 1971. Weight: 1.87g [1.78g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 17.14 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "HALF NEW PENNY" with date written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Mintage: 3,000,000. Minted Years: 1971 and 1980.

KM#30 1 penny. Year: 1971. Weight: 3.65g [3.55g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 20.32 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "ONE NEW PENNY" with date written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Mintage: 4,500,000. Minted Years: 1971 and 1980.

KM#31 2 pence. Year: 1971. Weight: 7.23g [7.12g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.91 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Jersey arms in the center. "TWO NEW PENCE" with date written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Mintage: 2,225,000. Minted Years: 1971, 1975 and 1980.
 
1972
 

KM#38 Two Pounds Fifty Pence. Year: 1972. Weight: 27.45g [27.10g]. Metal: 0.925 Silver. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 39.60 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in at the top section. Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "·SILVER WEDDING 1972·" written at bottom section. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Lobster (Homarus gammarus, also known as the European lobster or common lobster) facing right in the center. "· TWO POUNDS FIFTY PENCE ·" written at bottom section. Mintage: 24,000 + 1,500 Proofs. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: 25th Anniversary of the Marriage of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip. Engraver: Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth II's side) and Norman Sillman (Value side).

 
1975
 

Same as KM#31 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1975. Weight: 7.11g [7.12g]. Mintage: 750,000.

Same as KM#33 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1975. Weight: 11.32g  [11.31g]. Mintage: 1.022,000.

 
1977
 

KM#44 25 pence. Year: ND (1977). Weight: 28.20g [28.28g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 38.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written on the upper part. Mont Orgueil Castle and Gorey Harbour in the center. Value "TWENTY FIVE PENCE" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND 1952-1977" written around her clockwise. Mintage: 255,510. Minted Years: One year type. Subject: Queen Elizabeth II's Silver Jubilee (25 years of reign).

Note: This coin also exits in 0.9250 silver as KM#44a (Mintage: 25,000) with same weight and diameter. Engravers: Bernard Sindall (Gorey Harbour side) and Arnold Machin (Elizabeth portrait side).

The reverse design by Bernard Sindall is the Royal and Ancient castle of Mont Orgueil, which stands above Gorey Harbour and was for centuries the residence of the Lords, Keepers and Governors of Jersey. Its name, meaning Mount Pride, was given to it by Thomas, Duke of Clarence, brother of Henry V, who was impressed by its unique position and great strength. In 1966, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, transferred ownership of Mont Orgueil Castle (and Elizabeth Castle) from the Crown to the people of Jersey on condition that the castles were to be maintained as historic monuments although they had already been in the care of the Island since 1923. On 6th July 1996, the Lieutenant Governor - The Queen's representative in the Island - presented the keys of both castles to the Bailiff. In accordance with the specified condition, Mont Orgueil has since undergone extensive restoration work to help ensure its historic past is not forgotten.

 
1980
 

Same as KM#30 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1980. Weight: 3.57g [3.55g]. Mintage: 3,000,000 + 10,000 Proof. 

Same as KM#31 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1980. Weight: 7.16g [7.12g]. Mintage: 2,000,000 + 10,000 Proof.

 

Same as KM#32 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1980. Weight: 5.68g [5.65g]. Mintage: 800,000 + 10,000 Proof.

Same as KM#33 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1980. Weight: 11.31g  [11.31g]. Mintage: 1.000,000 + 10,000 Proof.

 
1981
 

KM#47 2 pence. Year: 1981. Weight: 7.14g [7.12g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.91 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Jersey arms in the center with date split on both sides. "TWO PENCE" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Mintage: 50,000 + 15,000 Proofs. Minted Years: One year type.
 
1983
Engravers: Arnold Machin (Elizabeth portrait side) and Robert Lowe (Value side). The first major change in Jersey's coinage designs in 140 years took place in 1983 when the Seal of the Bailiwick, which had previously been shown on a common reverse for all denominations, was replaced by individual representations of landmarks of Jersey history. The different designs help to distinguish the different values of the coins.

KM#54 1 penny. Year: 1983. Weight: 3.57g [3.64g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 20.32 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Le Hocq Watchtower, St. Clement in the center. "ONE PENNY" written at the bottom. Mintage: 500,000. Minted Years: 1983-1990 and 1992 (in sets only).

KM#55 2 pence. Year: 1983. Weight: 7.15g [7.12g]. Metal: Bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.91 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. L'Hermitage, St. Helier in the center. "TWO PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 800,000. Minted Years: 1983-1990.
Note: St. Helier was reputed to have come to Jersey and settled himself upon the small islet where the Hermitage Chapel now stands.

KM#56.1 5 pence. Year: 1983. Weight: 5.65g [5.65g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 23.60 mm. Thickness: 1.70 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Seymour Tower, Grouville, L'Avathison in the center. "FIVE PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 400,000. Minted Years: 1983-1988 (1987 in sets only).
 
1984
In the year, digit "4" in larger than the rest of the digits.

Same as KM#54 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1984. Weight: 3.62g [3.64g]. Mintage: 1,000,000.

Same as KM#55 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1984. Weight: 7.22g [7.12g]. Mintage: 750,000.

Same as KM#56.1 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1984. Weight: 5.60g [5.65g]. Mintage: 300,000.

 
1985
 

Same as KM#54 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1985. Weight: 3.65g [3.64g]. Mintage: 1,000,000.

 
1986
 

Same as KM#54 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1986. Weight: 3.56g [3.64g]. Mintage: 2,000,000.

Same as KM#55 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1986. Weight: 7.15g [7.12g]. Mintage: 1,000,000.

 
1987
 

Same as KM#54 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1987. Weight: 3.66g [3.64g]. Mintage: 1,500,000.

Same as KM#55 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1987. Weight: 7.17g [7.12g]. Mintage: 2,000,000.

KM#57.1 10 Pence. Year: 1987. Weight: 11.05g  [11.31g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 28.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. La Houque Bie, Faldouet, St. Martin in the center. "TEN PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 800,000. Minted Years: 1983-1990.
Note: Faldouet dolmen or La Pouquelaye de Faldouet dates back to about 2500BC. It is a Neolithic dolmen and has been so changed by would-be archaeological diggers and restorers over the centuries, which it is impossible to say for sure how it looked originally. A passage of 17 stones leads to a roughly circular chamber surrounded by the remains of side-cells and beyond that is a horseshoe chamber of seven uprights covered by a huge capstone weighing about 24 tons. The term 'Pouquelaye' needs explaining. Pouquelaye or pouclee means fairystone. Long after the menhir and dolmens on the island had ceased to be the ritual centers for prehistoric man, many of the stones were still venerated for their huge size and continued to have a role to play in the supernatural beliefs of the islanders. As the original purpose of these stones had long been forgotten, their presence was explained by later generations as a result of fairy magic. The stones were thought to have been borne through the air by fairies - carried in their magic aprons!

KM#58.1 50 Pence. Year: 1987. Weight: 13.57g [13.50g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 30.00 mm; 7-sided. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Grosnez Castle in the center. "FIFTY PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 150,000. Minted Years: 1983-1984, 1986-1990, 1992 (in sets), 1994 and 1997 (in sets).
 
1988
 

Same as KM#57.1 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1988. Weight: 11.38g  [11.31g]. Mintage: 650,000.

Same as KM#57.1 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1988. Weight: 13.55g [13.50g]. Mintage: 130,000.

 
1989
 

Same as KM#54 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1989. Weight: 3.57g [3.64g]. Mintage: 1,500,000.

Same as KM#57.1 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1989. Weight: 11.13g  [11.31g]. Mintage: 700,000.

 
1990
 

Same as KM#54 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1990. Weight: 3.63g [3.64g]. Mintage: 2,000,000.

Same as KM#55 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1990. Weight: 7.13g [7.12g]. Mintage: 2,600,000.

KM#56.2 5 Pence. Year: 1990. Weight: 3.29g [3.25g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 18.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Seymour Tower, Grouville, L'Avathison in the center. "FIVE PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 4,000,000. Minted Years: 1990-1993 and 1997 (in sets only).

Same as KM#57.1 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1990. Weight: 11.33g  [11.31g]. Mintage: 850,000.

 
1991
 

Same as KM#56.2 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1991. Weight: 3.30g [3.25g]. Mintage: 2,000,000.

 
1992
 

KM#55b 2 pence. Year: 1992. Weight: 7.12g [7.12g]. Metal: Copper Plated Steel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.91 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. L'Hermitage, St. Helier in the center. "TWO PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1992 and 1997 (in sets only).

KM#57.2 10 Pence. Year: 1992. Weight: 6.46g [6.50g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 24.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. L'Hermitage, St. Helier in the center. "TEN PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 7,000,000. Minted Years: 1992, 1997 (in sets only) and 1998.

Same as above mentioned coin, but slightly smaller.

Weight: 6.52g [6.50g].

 
1993
 

Same as KM#56.2 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1993. Weight: 3.26g [3.25g]. Mintage: 2,000,000.

 
1994
Starting in 1994, the composition of 1 Penny and 2 Pence coin is now copper plated steel instead of bronze.

KM#54b 1 penny. Year: 1994. Weight: 3.58g [3.64g]. Metal: Copper Plated Steel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 20.32 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Le Hocq Watchtower, St. Clement in the center. "ONE PENNY" written at the bottom. Mintage: 2,000,000. Minted Years: 1994 and 1997.

KM#17 20 Pence. Year: 1994. Weight: 5.05g [5.00g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 21.95 mm; 7-sided. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Lighthouse at Corbiere in the center. "TWENTY PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 200,000. Minted Years: 1983-1984, 1986-1987, 1989-1990, 1992 (in sets), 1994 and 1996-1998.
Note: At the far southwest tip of Jersey is Corbiere Lighthouse, which was the first concrete lighthouse to be built in the British Isles, and warns approaching ships of the dangerous rocks in the area. The lighthouse coin side is designed by Robert Lowe.

Same as KM#57.1 mentioned above, but...

Year: 1994. Weight: 13.49g [13.50g]. Mintage: 200,000.

 
1998
Engravers: Ian Rank-Broadley (Elizabeth portrait side) and Robert Lowe (Value side).

KM#103 1 penny. Year: 1998. Weight: 3.64g [3.55g]. Metal: Copper Plated Steel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 20.27 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom right side. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Le Hocq Watchtower, St. Clement in the center. "ONE PENNY" written at the bottom. Mintage: 6,350,000. Minted Years: 1998, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006 and 2008.

KM#104 2 pence. Year: 1998. Weight: 7.13g [7.12g]. Metal: Copper Plated Steel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 25.91 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom right side. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. L'Hermitage, St. Helier in the center. "TWO PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 3,750,000. Minted Years: 1998, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006 and 2008.
 
2002
 

KM#105 5 Pence. Year: 2002. Weight: 3.24g [3.25g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 18.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom right side. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Seymour Tower, Grouville, L'Avathison in the center. "FIVE PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 1,200,000. Minted Years: 1998, 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2008.

KM#106 10 Pence. Year: 2002. Weight: 6.49g [6.60g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 24.50 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom right side. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. L'Hermitage, St. Helier in the center. "TEN PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 500,000. Minted Years: 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010.
 
2003
 

Same as KM#103 mentioned above, but...

Year: 2003. Weight: 3.57g [3.55g]. Mintage: 1,575,000.

 
2005
 

KM#107 20 Pence. Year: 2005. Weight: 5.03g [5.00g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 21.95 mm; 7-sided. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint. Obverse: Queen Elizabeth's portrait facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in around her clockwise. Date at the bottom right side. Reverse: "BAILIWICK OF JERSEY" written at the top section. Lighthouse at Corbiere in the center. "TWENTY PENCE" written at the bottom. Mintage: 500,000. Minted Years: 1998, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2009.
 
2006
 

Same as KM#103 mentioned above, but...

Year: 2006. Weight: 3.56g [3.55g]. Mintage: 585,000.

Same as KM#104 mentioned above, but...

Year: 2006. Weight: 7.14g [7.12g]. Mintage: 1,200,000.

 
2008
 

Same as KM#103 mentioned above, but...

Year: 2008. Weight: 3.59g [3.55g]. Mintage: 4,800,000.

Same as KM#104 mentioned above, but...

Year: 2008. Weight: 7.12g [7.12g]. Mintage: 2,459,000.

Same as KM#105 mentioned above, but...

Year: 2008. Weight: 3.22g [3.25g]. Mintage: 3,600,000.

 
2009
 

Same as KM#107 mentioned above, but...

Year: 2009. Weight: 5.00g [5.00g]. Mintage: 1,500,000. 

 
 
The ÉCRÉHOUS (Les Écréhous, Êcrého)
 
A group of tiny islets and rocks located 6 miles (10½ km.) northeast of Jersey and some 8 miles (13 km.) off the coast of France - many of the rocks are underwater at high tide; the archipelago was considerably larger in early times, but has been slowly washing away. They are not under permanent settlement at this time, but are visited frequently by tourists, fishermen, and others - La Maîtr'Île has a ruined abbey. In former times they were often the site of smuggling rendezvous.
 
  • Normandy...........................................933 - 1204
  • France............................................1204 - 1259
  • England (Normandy)................................1259 - 1380
  • France............................................1380 - 1382
  • England...........................................1382 - 1461
  • France............................................1461 - 1468
  • England...........................................1468 - 1781
  • Occupied by France.........................05 Jan 1781 - 07 Jan 1781
  • Great Britain.....................................1781 - 1940
    • Philippe Pinel...............................1848 - 1898
    • Pinel assumed the style of "king of the Écréhous" while he resided here (on the islet of Bliantch'Île), going so far as to exchange greetings and gifts with Queen Victoria.
  • Occupied by Germany...............................1940 - 1945
  • Great Britain.....................................1945 - date
    • Alphonse Le Gastelois...............................fl. 1960's/70's
    • Le Gastelois, a resident of Jersey, found refuge in these islets when he came under suspicion of being anotorious sex criminal in his home island - entirely untrue, as it turned out. While he resided here, he too referred to himself as "king of the Écréhous".
  • These rocks have been a source of a certain level of tension between Great Britain and France for a great many years. In the Twentieth Century, Great Britain indicated that it wanted the matter resolved one way or another, and eventually, in 1950, the potential border dispute was submitted for arbitration to the International Court of Justice, which ultimately decided in Great Britain's favor in 1953. This judgement has, however, not prevented the occasional gesture even so - as late as 1994 French fishermen have briefly occupied the place and raised Norman flags, more as a matter of symbolism in the context of protests over Channel Islands fishing regulations than anything else, although a desire for French annexation has been voiced as well. These incidents are of short duration and have been settled peaceably.
 
The MINQUIERS (Les Minquiers, Les Mîntchièrs)
 
A group of tiny islets and rocks located 9 miles (14½ km.) south of Jersey. These reefs and rocks have figured repeatedly in literature featuring themes of shipwreck or smuggling.
 
  • Normandy...........................................933 - 1204
  • France............................................1204 - 1259
  • England (Normandy)................................1259 - 1380
  • France............................................1380 - 1382
  • England...........................................1382 - 1461
  • France............................................1461 - 1468
  • England...........................................1468 - 1781
  • Occupied by France.........................05 Jan 1781 - 07 Jan 1781
  • Great Britain.....................................1781 - 1940
  • Occupied by Germany...............................1940 - 1945
  • Great Britain.....................................1945 - date
  • These rocks have been a source of a certain level of tension between Great Britain and France for a great many years. In the Twentieth Century, Great Britain indicated that it wanted the matter resolved one way or another, and eventually, in 1950, the potential border dispute was submitted for arbitration to the International Court of Justice, which ultimately decided in Great Britain's favor in 1953. This judgement has, however, not prevented the occasional gesture even so - as late as 1998 French nationals have briefly occupied the place, as often as not in symbolic protest against some action or position taken by the UK. These incidents are normally of short duration and have been settled peaceably.
 
 
 
Countries / Territories
 
Chiefa Coins