Marshall Islands
 
 
    
    21 Aug 1526            Discovered and claimed for Spain by Alonso de Salazar
    01 Oct 1529            Sighted by Spanish Capt. Antonio Saavedra, named 
                           Islas de Los Reyes.
    30 Jun 1788            Rediscovered by British Capt. John Marshall, named
	                   the Marshall Islands.
           1816            First visit by Russian Capt. Otto von Kotzebue.
           1859            Germans establish permanent trading stations.
           1874            Spain reasserts its claim to the islands, but
 	                   does begin settlement.                   
    22 Oct 1885            Marshall Islands are sold to Germany by Spain;
                           administrated by Jaluit Company.
    13 Sep 1886            German protectorate formally declared.
                           (Kaiserliches Kommissariat Jaluit; from 1893
                           Landeshauptmannschaft Jaluit).
    01 Apr 1906            part of German New Guinea (under Papua New Guinea)
                           (District of Jaluit [from 1911 Jaluit Station,
                           subordinated to district officer in Caroline Is.])
    03 Oct 1914            Japanese occupation
    17 Dec 1920            League of Nations mandate (from 01 Apr 1922, South
                           Seas Agency; under Palau).
       Jul 1921            Japanese transfer civil administration from Chuuk
                           to Koror.
           1935            Japan declares that the mandated islands are an
                           "integral part of the Japanese Empire".
    23 Feb 1944            U.S. occupation (under Micronesia; from 17 Feb 1944
                           on Eniwetok, Kwajalein on 04 Feb 1944, Majuro on
                           01 Mar 1944).
    18 Jul 1947            Japanese mandate formally revoked; part of the UN
                           Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands
                           (under Micronesia, Federated States of)
    01 May 1979            Autonomy (Republic of the Marshall Islands)
    21 Oct 1986            Compact of Free Association with the U.S. effective
    10 Jul 1987            Trust territory dissolved
    22 Dec 1990            Final independence (Security Council ratifies
                           termination of trusteeship)
 
  • President
  • Amata Kabua......................................17 Nov 1979 - 20 Dec 1996
  • Kunio Lemari (acting)............................20 Dec 1996 - 14 Jan 1997
  • Imata Kabua......................................14 Jan 1997 - 10 Jan 2000
  • Kessai Hesa Note.................................10 Jan 2000 - 07 Jan 2008
  • Litokwa Tomeing..................................07 Jan 2008 - 21 Oct 2009
  • Tomeing was removed from office by the Marshall Islands' first successful vote of no confidence on 21 October 2009. Tomeing had survived two previous votes of no confidence.
  • Ruben R. Zackhras (acting).......................21 Oct 2009 - 02 Nov 2009
  • He was acting President of the Marshall Islands from 21 October 2009 to 26 October 2009. He previously served as Finance Minister from 1989 to 1997.
  • Jurelang Zedkaia.................................02 Nov 2009 - 10 Jan 2012
  • Christopher Jorebon Loeak........................10 Jan 2012 - date
  • On 26 September 2013, Christoper Loeak made a speech to the General Debate of the 68th Session of the United Nations General Assembly and said: "Global efforts on climate change are falling short - and low-lying island nations such as mine are already paying the earliest costs of what is fast becoming a global crisis. In every sense, the world must build for future risks, and too often, we are still setting course for current conditions. It is the seas that are rising - not the islands that are sinking. I will not concede my own land or my nation; but nor will I rest until my fellow world leaders have signed onto to act, not just out of economic convenience, but out of a common responsibility of all to strive for upward momentum."
 

Marshall Islands uses US Dollar. Many commemorative coins as non-circulating collector coinage were issues from 1986, 1988 to 1998 mostly by Medallic Art Co. (M), Roger Williams Mint Rhode Islands (R) and Sunshine Mining Co. Mint Idaho (S). Despite having the face value equal to US Dollars, they are often sold for less price due to lack of demand and minted in abundance. National motto, Jepilpilin ke Ejukaan (Marshallese: "Accomplishment Through Joint Effort") is visible on all Marshall Islands coins.

 
1994
 

KM#182 5 Dollars. Year: 1994. Weight: 28.28g. Metal: Copper-Nickel (Cu=75% +  Ni=25%). Diameter: 38.71mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: N/A. Obverse: Marshall Island Seal. Reverse Legends: To The Heroes of the Philippines - MacArthur and staff. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.

KM#182 5 Dollars. Year: 1994. Weight: 21.43g. Metal: Brass. Diameter: 34.60mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: N/A. Obverse: Marshall Island Seal. Reverse Legends: To The Heroes of the Philippines - MacArthur and staff. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.

KM#182 5 Dollars. Year: 1994. Weight: 31.10g. Metal: .Silver (Ag=99.9%). Diameter: 38.71mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: N/A. Obverse: Marshall Island Seal. Reverse Legends: To The Heroes of the Philippines - MacArthur and staff. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.

 
"People of the Philippines, I have returned !" General Douglas MacArthur's voice trembled with emotion as he delivered these words on October 20, 1944, from "Red Beach" on Leyte Island. Keeping a promise he had made two and a half years earlier, when he was ordered by President Franklin Roosevelt to leave Corregidor just before its capture by the Japanese, MacArthur returned to the Philippines. Five weeks before the landing, the U.S. 3rs Fleet had raided Japanese air and naval bases in the central and southern Philippines in preparation for an invasion of the Palau islands, about 500 miles east. Having met with little resistance, U.S. forces destroyed more than 450 Japanese planes and nearly 60 ships. Encouraged by the blow that had been dealt to Japan, Vice Admiral William Halsey declared the area was "wide open." The scheduled invasion of Leyte was moved up two months in a plan that included the subsequent capture of the island of Luzan, where the capital Manila was located. What transpired at Leyte could actually be described as a miniature, four-day war. Fought in three dimensions - land, sea and air - this battle saw the introduction of kamikaze suicide planes and the sinking of most of Japan's battleships plus all four of its aircraft carriers. Further devastated by the this invasion, Japan eventually gave up Manila and Corregidor as well. To honor the brave soldiers who fought for the liberation of the Philippines, the Republic of Marshall Islands marked the 50th Anniversary of this historic event with the issuance of the Heroes of the the Philippines Commemorative Coin Set. The coin displays General Douglas MacArthur and Philippine President-in-exile Sergio Osmena wading ashore at Leyte Island from the USS Nashville landing craft. Heroes of the Philippines COA: I certify that this Heroes of the Philippines Coin set contains one $50 coin minted in one full troy ounce of .999 pure silver, one $10 coin minted in solid brass and one $5 minted in solid cupronickel. All three coins are official legal tender of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Signed by: Ruben R. Zackhras, Minister of Finance of Republic of the Marshall Islands.
 
1995
 

KM#216 5 Dollars. Year: 1995. Weight: 28.28g. Metal: Copper-Nickel (Cu=75% +  Ni=25%). Diameter: 38.71mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: N/A. Obverse: Marshall Island Seal. Reverse Legends: Peace - Victory in Europe. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: One year type.
 
 
 
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