Pitcairn Islands
 
 
               26 Jan 1706  Ducie and Henderson discovered by Portuguese sailor Pedro
                            Fernandez de Quiros and named them La Encarnación and  
                            San Juan Bautista respectively.
               02 Jul 1767  Discovered by Capt. Philip Carteret of H.M.S. Swallow and
                            named Pitcairn's Islands.
               28 Apr 1789  Near Tonga mutiny broke out on, led by Christian against
                            William Bligh.
               23 Jan 1790  mutineers from H.M.S. Bounty, after burning the ship
                            settled on Pitcairn.
                      1791  Ducie re-discovered by British Capt. Edwards aboard
                            H.M.S. Pandora.
               06 Feb 1808  Pitcairn re-discovered by US Capt. Mayhew Folger aboard
                            the Topaz.
               02 Mar 1819  Henderson Island visited by U.S. Capt. Henry King aboard
                            Elizabeth, renamed Elizabeth Island.
               17 Jun 1819  Henderson re-discovered by British Capt. Henderson of the
                            British East India Company ship Hercules, renamed
                            Henderson Island.
               26 Jan 1824  Oneo is discovered by U.S. Capt. George Worth aboard the
                            whaler Oneo and named Oneo Island.
 07 Mar 1831 - 03 Sep 1831  islanders temporarily removed to Tahiti.
    Oct 1831 - 1838         Commonwealth of Pitcairn.
               29 Nov 1838  British protectorate.
 03 May 1856 - 17 Jan 1859  islanders relocated to Norfolk Island.
               1857         some islanders begin to return from Norfolk Island.
               02 Feb 1864  second group of islanders return from Norfolk Island.
               16 Sep 1887  British colony of Pitcairn (British settlement),
                            under the jurisdiction of the governor of Fiji.
 03 May 1898 - 03 Jul 1952  high commissioners as part of the British Western Pacific 
                            Territories. 
               01 Jul 1902  Henderson, Oneo on 10 Jul and Ducie on 19 Dec, these 
                            islands were annexed by U.K. 
                      1938  Ducie, Henderson and Oneo islands are incorporated into 
                            Pitcairn as one administrative district.
               10 Oct 1970  Pitcairn and dependencies a separate colony.
                            Governors under the British high commissioners of the
                            New Zealand.
 
The Pitcairn Islands, officially named the Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno Islands, are a group of four volcanic islands in the southern Pacific Ocean. The islands are a British overseas territory (formerly a British colony), the last remaining in the Pacific. Only Pitcairn Island, the second largest is inhabited. It is located 1350 miles (2170 Km) south-east of Tahiti. The islanders subsist on fishing, garden produce and crops. The sale of postage stamps and carved curios to passing ships bring cash income.

The islands are best known for being the home of the descendants of the Bounty mutineers and the Tahitians who accompanied them, an event retold in numerous books and films. Ducie Island atoll land area: 0.7 km2 (total area: 3.9 km2), Henderson Island uplifted coral island 37.3 km2, Oeno Island Atoll 0.65 km2 (total area: 16.65 km2) and Pitcairn Island volcanic island 4.6 km2. Pitcairn Islands island group 43.25 km2 includes reef flat and lagoon of the atolls. Capital: Adamstown.

Discovered and sighted in 1767 by a British naval officer: Captain Philip Carteret. He was unable to land because of violent seas. Pitcairn was not occupied until 1790 when Fletcher Christian and nine mutineers from British ship, HMS Bounty, along with some Tahitian men and women went ashore and survived in obscurity until discovered by American whalers in 1808. The primary religion is Seventh-day Adventist and a public school provides basic education. In 1898 the settlement was placed under the jurisdiction of the Commissioner for the Western Pacific. Since 1970 this British settlement has been governed through a locally elected council under a governor.
 
 
  • There is considerable evidence of old occupation of the island by Polynesians; but the place was uninhabited when discovered by Europeans (Great Britain, in 1767). Occupied by mutineers from HMS Bounty. Contact with outsiders re-established 1808, by British authorities 1814.
  • Fletcher Christian...............................23 Jan 1790 - 03 Oct 1793
  • Fletcher Christian mutinied against its captain, Lieutenant William Bligh on 28 Apr 1789. Bligh escaped by open-boat journey to Coupang. Besides Thursday October (Born 1790), Fletcher Christian also had a younger son named Charles Christian (Born 1792) and a daughter Mary Ann Christian (Born 1793) from Mauatua 'Isabella'.
  • Edward "Ned" Young...............................03 Oct 1793 - 25 Dec 1800
  • Young was asleep during the mutiny, and did not wake until after it was over. Thus, he neither participated in the mutiny nor was able to fight against it or join Bligh and others who left the ship in a long boat. Young was the only crew member to sleep through this ordeal. However, he soon announced that he fully supported Christian and the mutineers, and that he would never attempt to return to England. After several years of living peacefully on the island, the Tahitian men grew tired of being treated badly, and not having as much access to the women as their white counterparts. Tension was also added by the pressure put on the colony by increasing alcoholism, after a small distillery was built by the mutineers. In October 1793, a war broke out between the mutineers and the four surviving Tahitian men who sailed with them. Five of the mutineers, including Christian, and all of the Tahitian men were killed. Young slept through most of this battle as well, and was protected by the Tahitian women, who largely supported the mutineers. Young did help to hunt down and kill Neho, one of the Tahitian men. The other three surviving mutineers were Matthew Quintal, William McCoy and John Adams. Young was accepted as the leader of the island, and Adams became his friend and deputy, though some sources seem to indicate that the two men had an equal amount of power. They gained much more respect than McCoy and Quintal, who became alcoholics. McCoy fell off a cliff, possibly as suicide, and Quintal afterwards became even more alcoholic and threatened to kill the entire community. Adams and Young killed Quintal to prevent this from happening, making themselves the only two surviving mutineers. Meanwhile they had established fruit plantations and had multitudes of children by their Tahitian wives. In 1799 Young began to suffer from asthma. At about the same time, he converted to Christianity. Adams and the other islanders also converted, and Young taught Adams and several of the children to read and write. Young's health became progressively worse and eventually he died of asthma, but Adams continued his work of educating the women and children, taking control over leadership of the island, and lived to see the island rediscovered by American and British ships.
  • John Adams.......................................25 Dec 1800 - 05 Mar 1829
    He was the last survivor of the Bounty mutineers who settled on Pitcairn Island in January 1790, the year after the mutiny. His real name was John Adams; He used the name Alexander Smith until he was discovered in 1808 by Captain Mayhew Folger of the ship Topaz. His children used the surname "Adams". The American sailing ship Topaz was the first to rediscover Pitcairn in 1808. John Adams was eventually granted amnesty for the mutiny. On 17 December 1825 Adams was married to Teio, or 'Mary', Teio had already born Adams only son, George Adams in 1804. The main settlement and capital of Pitcairn, Adamstown, is named for John Adams. The death of John Adams led to a power vacuum. An important leader was Thursday October Christian, the first child born on the island. In the ensuing period, the islanders tried to relocate to Tahiti, until the arrival of Joshua Hill.
  • No overall government............................05 Mar 1829 - 07 Mar 1831
  • Island uninhabited (people transferred to Tahiti).....07 Mar - 03 Sep 1831
  • No overall government............................03 Sep 1831 - Oct 1832
  • Joshua Hill.........................................Oct 1832 - 1838
  • He was an American adventurer. In 1832 he arrived on Pitcairn Island which was first inhabited in the 1790s by British mutineers from the HMS Bounty and some Tahitians who joined them. The descendants of the mutineers had recently migrated to Tahiti following the death of the last mutineer, John Adams, but had recently returned. Hill, taking advantage of the instability, was able to be elected President of the island. He served in that position until 1838. His rule became increasingly tyrannical, and he began imprisoning many of the island's inhabitants. He was deposed and driven off the island in 1838, and the descendants of the original inhabitants took control of the island again.
  • Great Britain....................................29 Nov 1838 - 03 May 1856
  • Island uninhabited (people to Norfolk Islands)...03 May 1856 - 17 Jan 1859
  • Great Britain....................................17 Jan 1859 - date
    • Administered from Fiji.............................1952 - 1970
    • Administered from New Zealand......................1970 - date
 
New Zealand currency has been used since July 10, 1967. The Royal Mint has been authorized by the Governor of the Pitcairn Islands to strike commemorative coins in 1988 and 1990. Later Pobjoy Mint was chosen to produce more commemorative coins for Pitcairn Islands from 2002.
 

 
KM#1 50 Dollars. Year: ND (1988). Weight: 155.60 grams. Metal: .999 Silver. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 65 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Royal Mint [Llantrisant, Mid Glamorgan, CF7 8YT, U.K.] Obverse: Drafting of constitution, 1838-1988. Reverse: Queen Elizabeth II portrait. Mintage: 10,000. Minted Years: One year type. Ruler: Elizabeth II [Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor].
Background history of the coin: By 1838 the Islanders realised the need for a basic code of law and they prevailed upon Captain Russell Elliott of H.M. Sloop Fly to draw up a brief Constitution, which was signed on board the Fly on 30th Nov 1838. It is from this date that the Islanders consider they were formally incorporated into the Empire. The obverse of the coin features Raphael Maklouf's portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II with the inscription "Elizabeth II, Pitcairn Islands" and the denomination 50 Dollars. The reverse of the coin features a design by Royal Mint engraver Robert Elderton depicting H. M. Sloop Fly and the inscription "Drafting of Constitution 1838 - 1988".
 
2009
 
The Story of the Pitcairn Islands is one that is wedded to the story of the H.M.A.V. Bounty, a ship made famous due to a historic mutiny that has been retold in numerous films, television series and books. When Fletcher Christian along with 8 Mutineers and 19 Polynesian men and women first settled the island, their connection to the Bounty could not be completely set aside. Even though the charred remains of the Bounty lie at rest beneath the waters of Bounty Bay, the relics of the ship have survived to become icons of the island and its current inhabitants. These icons feature on the reverse of each coin in the 2009 Pitcairn Island Brilliant Uncirculated Coin Set. The New Zealand Mint takes great pleasure in minting this historic coin collection, brought to you with the endorsement of the Pitcairn Islands Office. The obverse of each coin features the Raphael Maklouf effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, sovereign of the Commonwealth and Pitcairn Island, along with the year of issue (2009) and the coins respective denominations. The reverse of each coin depicts a relic from the H.M.A.V. Bounty along with its description and the coins respective denomination.
 

KM#54 5 cents. Year: 2009. Weight: 4.30 grams. Metal: Copper plated bronze. Edge: Plain. Diameter: 19.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: New Zealand Mint. Obverse: Young bust of Queen Elizabeth II's facing right within center circle. "ELIZABETH II" written on the left side clockwise. "PITCAIRN ISLANDS" written on the right side clockwise. Date at the bottom.
Reverse: "BOUNTY ANCHOR" written at the top. Numeral "5" written below it. Anchor pointing right in the center. "CENTS" written at the bottom. Mintage: 20,000. Minted Years: 2009-2010. Ruler: Elizabeth II [Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor].

KM#55 10 cents. Year: 2009. Weight: 5.80 grams. Metal: Copper plated bronze. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 22.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: New Zealand Mint. Obverse: Young bust of Queen Elizabeth II's facing right within center circle. "ELIZABETH II" written on the left side clockwise. "PITCAIRN ISLANDS" written on the right side clockwise. Date at the bottom.
Reverse: "BOUNTY BELL" written at the top. Numeral "10" written on the left side in the center. Bounty Bell titled right on the right side. "CENTS" written at the bottom. Mintage: 20,000. Minted Years: 2009-2010. Ruler: Elizabeth II [Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor].

KM#56 20 cents. Year: 2009. Weight: 7.30 grams. Metal: Nickel plated bronze. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 25.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: New Zealand Mint. Obverse: Young bust of Queen Elizabeth II's facing right within center circle. "ELIZABETH II" written on the left side clockwise. "PITCAIRN ISLANDS" written on the right side clockwise. Date at the bottom.
Reverse: "BOUNTY BIBLE" written at the top. Bounty Bible in the center with Numeral "20" written below it. "CENTS" written at the bottom. Mintage: 20,000. Minted Years: 2009-2010. Ruler: Elizabeth II [Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor].

KM#57 50 cents. Year: 2009. Weight: 9.30 grams. Metal: Nickel plated bronze. Edge: Alternating Reeded and Plain (four each). Diameter: 28.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: New Zealand Mint. Obverse: Young bust of Queen Elizabeth II's facing right within center circle. "ELIZABETH II" written on the left side clockwise. "PITCAIRN ISLANDS" written on the right side clockwise. Date at the bottom.
Reverse: "BOUNTY LONGBOAT" written at the top. Longboat with some people on it in the center with Numeral "50" written above it. "CENTS" written at the bottom. Mintage: 20,000. Minted Years: 2009-2010. Ruler: Elizabeth II [Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor].

KM#58 1 Dollars. Year: 2009. Weight: 17.30 grams. Metal: Copper plated bronze. Edge: Reeded. Diameter: 32.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: New Zealand Mint. Obverse: Young bust of Queen Elizabeth II's facing right within center circle. "ELIZABETH II" written on the left side clockwise. "PITCAIRN ISLANDS" written on the right side clockwise. Date at the bottom.
Reverse: Value "ONE DOLLAR" written at the top. Bounty Cannon in the center. "BOUNTY CANNON" written at the bottom. Mintage: 20,000. Minted Years: 2009-2010. Ruler: Elizabeth II [Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor].

KM#59 2 Dollars. Year: 2009. Weight: 20.50 grams. Metal: Copper plated bronze. Edge: Alternating Reeded and Plain (four each). Diameter: 35.00 mm. Alignment: Medal. Mint: New Zealand Mint. Obverse: oung bust of Queen Elizabeth II's facing right within center circle. "ELIZABETH II" written on the left side clockwise. "PITCAIRN ISLANDS" written on the right side clockwise. Date at the bottom.

Reverse: Value "TWO DOLLARS" written at the top. Steering wheel in the center. "H.M.A.V. BOUNTY HELM" written at the bottom. Mintage: 20,000. Minted Years: One year type. Ruler: Elizabeth II [Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor].

 
 
 
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