Dheri-Talokar (Jagir)
 
This branch/clan of the Tarin tribe came from Tarin Kot in Qandahar, to their present location in Hazara, Pakistan in about 1632. They were led by Sardar Bostan Khan, who, at that time was engaged in the defence of the city of Qandahar, which was taken by the Safavid Persians. Bostan Khan fought bravely but had to eventually escape with his family and a small group of loyal tribal followers, to Pishin (now in Baluchistan province of modern Pakistan but back then, was part of the Mughal Empire) where he sought refuge with some other local Tarins. His bravery was recognised by the Mughal Emperor and he was given the honorary title of 'Sher Khan' and lands were thereafter conferred on him in the Hazara region, where he was also given the additional charge of defending the inhabitants of the Hazara plains from marauding Afghan/Pathan gangs from across the River Indus. He settled there with his family members and a small number of around 200 or 300 followers. Over time, the family gained considerable renown. Later in 1761, Sardar Bahadur Khan II, who was the uncle (by marriage) of King Ahmad Shah Durrani, led a flank of Afghan cavalry (Risalah) in the Third Battle of Panipat in 1761, in which the Marathas were defeated comprehensively. Afterwards, another chief, Sardar Najibullah Khan, ruled with great wisdom from 1776 to 1799. In 1888, after the death of Nawab Bahadur Sadar Muhammad Habib Khan Tarin, Risaldar and Chief of Dheri and Talokar, the Tarin Sardari was formally abolished by Punjab Government, due to the unreliability of competing heirs. By a decision of the ruling government in April 1889, Dheri and Talokar jagir was split up, with Talokar (also refered to as Talokar Khangi Jagir) given to the family head as well as some additional land and shares in a further eight or nine villages, the sons of Habib Khan were placed under Court of Wards by the government and in due course, inherited this jagir. After the independence of Pakistan in 1947, much of the family's property was forcibly seized during successive land reforms in the 1960's and 1970's. The family today is noted for its very active public and social traditions which were set in place by Khan Abdel Salim Khan, and continued by his descendants. The Area used to be comprises of 62.2 Km2.
 
  • TARIN or TOR BATEZAI (Afghan) (title: Chief of Hazara Tarins, Khan of Dheri and Rais of Talokar)
  • Sardar Bostan Khan Sher Khan
  • He was the Sardar of Tor Tarin. He came and settled in Hazara on the invitation of the Mughals, around 1632, accompanied by some 300 clanspeople. He got married and had one son.
  • Sardar Bahadir Khan I S/o Sardar Bostan Khan Sher Khan
  • He got married and had two sons:.
  • Sardar Nadir Khan [Malik Darwesh] S/o Sardar Bahadir Khan I
  • Sardar Ilyas Khan [Malik Ilyas]  S/o Sardar Bahadir Khan I
  • He he was chief of the Tarins for a short time only.
  • Sardar Gadai Khan S/o Sardar Nadir Khan
  • Sardar Bahadir Khan II S/o Sardar Gadai Khan.............1762 - 1770
  • He was an Afghan 'risalah' commander who fought at the 3rd Battle of Panipat in January 1761 and was later confirmed in the sardari by Afghan King Ahmad Shah Abdali/Durrani who was a relative of his by marriage. He married and had sob. He died in 1769 or 1770 at Talokar.
  • Sardar Ameer Khan S/o Sardar Bahadir Khan II.............1770 - 1772
  • He was murdered in 1771 or 1772 by a cousin and rival claimant, Himmat Khan. He got married and had three sons: Sardar Rowhilla Khan, Shahbaz Khan (at Dheri) and Abdulla Khan (at Dheri).
  • Sardar Himmat Khan.......................................1772 - 1775
  • Sardar of Tor Tarin 1772-1775 of Darvesh village. He seized the chieftainship in about 1772 and was described as 'the usurper, a bold and reckless fellow', after his 'Macbeth like killing of Sardar Ameer Khan'. He also took over some adjacent lands of the Gujjars, murdering two of the elders of this tribe. He was also led by his greed, to block part of the Peshawar-Kashmir highway used by the passing Durrani 'lashkars', in order to levy tolls on them, but this move backfired and he had to retreat to the hills for a short while. On his return, he was himself murdered in 1775 by the son of the murdered Sardar. He married and had s son.
  • Sardar Rowhilla Khan...........................................1775
  • He was the Sardar of Tor Tarin, Rais of Talokar. He was based at Talokar, and was made clan war chief. He killed the usurper Sardar Himmat Khan in 1775 but was himself got killed the same year by the son of the murdered chief at Talokar. He got married and had son: Sardar Akbar Ali Khan.
  • Sardar Najibullah Khan S/o Sardar Himmat Khan...........1776 - 1800
  • He avenged his father's death on his own accession. He was based at Dheri and was Hakim-i-Hazara and overall Sardar and chief till his death. He ruled strongly with the support of the Gujjar, Turks and Malik tribes and obtained the formal sanction of the Durrani administration. He ruled the lower Hazara plains for quite some years, until his death in 1799 or 1800. A regency was established with his widow, Banni Begum, ruling till the adulthood of his son. Sardar Najibullah Khan has three sons: Sardar Muhammad Khan, Ghulam Nabi Khan and Ghulam Mujadid Khan. Ghulam Mujadid Khan's son Bostan Khan Tarin was killed by Sikhs in 1825.
  • Sardar Muhammad Khan S/o Sardar Najibullah Khan.........1800 - 1825
  • He was Khan of Dheri and he succeeded as chief but initially ruled under a regency, later he was taken prisoner by the Sikh governor of Hazara, General Hari Singh Nalwa and executed in 1825. He got married and had three sons: Sardar Ghulam Ahmed Khan, Afzal Khan and Ameer Khan.
    • Banni Begum (regent)...............................1800 - 1813
  • Interregnum.............................................1825 - 1841
  • A period known as bedakhli, i.e. a period of exile or expulsion, as a result of heavy taxation by the Sikhs. A period where there were three factions vying for power, viz. one supporting Sardar Ghulam Ahmad Khan, a second supporting a certain Azad Khan of Darvesh village who was trying to manipulate himself into power and a third group supporting Karam Khan, Rais of Talokar (son of Sardar Akbar Khan and grandson of Sardar Rowhilla Khan), the clan war chief, who kept alive the anti-Sikh struggle of the clan for some time. It was finally in winter 1841-1842, that Kunwar Partab Singh, son of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, came to Hazara and Ghulam Ahmed Khan made formal submission to him, and in return was accepted as overall Chief/Sardar.
  • Sardar Ghulum Ahmad Khan S/o Sardar Muhammad Khan.......1841 - Feb 1849
  • Sardar of Tor Tarin, Khan of Dheri and again briefly joined a local uprising against the Sikhs, besieging the Haripur fort in April 1846, along with the Tanoli and Tahirkheli tribes, but submitted himself to Dewan Mul Chand the following month. Later he schemed against British interests during the Second Sikh War of 1848-1849 and was eventually arrested in February 1849 on the orders of Major James Abbott, the first British administrator/District Commissioner of the Hazara area, who removed him and many Tarin adherents and chieftains from their offices and estates, and was eventually sent to Allahabad prison. He was sentenced to 10 years hard labour in October that same year; there in 1857, while still imprisoned, he tried to instigate a prison uprising against the British authorities and was summarily executed. He was hanged in Allahabad prison in October 1857, He was married, but had no children therefore, the chieftainship (Sardari) was returned to the legitimate head of family, Sardar Muhammad Habib Khan, Nawab-Bahadur, C.S.I.
  • Sardar Habib Khan S/o Karam Khan.......................1850 - Dec 1888
  • He was Sardar of Tor Tarin, Nawab of Dheri and Rais of Talokar and Hakim-i-Hazara, Risaldar. He was born in  1830. In a collateral branch of the family in 1850 he was chosen chief by a Tarin clan 'jirga' (council). He met Brevet Lt.-Colonel Robert Cornelius Napier in 1851, who was engaged with the extension of several military roads into the Indus and the nearby Attock area of the Punjab. A mutual regard developed between the soldier and the chief and Sardar Habib Khan subsequently carried out several important commissions for Napier. In February 1852, Sir Henry Lawrence the Punjab Resident visited the Hazara, and it was through Napierís intercession that Habib Khan and a number of other chiefs were able to obtain a general amnesty and return to their homes and resume their estates. His selection as Chief was ratified by Sir Henry Lawrence. He served as a native cavalry officer Risaldar in several campaigns in the Punjab hills and the Frontier/Hazara area and later as far as Bengal, Bihar and Bhutan between 1852 and 1863; shortly afterwards in the same year, 1863, he helped set up a silk-manufacturing factory in Sri Nagar, Kashmir State, on the request of Maharaja Ranbir Singh, on completion of the project he returned home and thereafter was engaged in extensive litigation with relatives and others, as well as the Punjab Government regarding some property. In 1868-1869, when the British were making their new Permanent Revenue Settlement for the Hazara area (completed in 1872), he objected to the reduction of his property in favour of some other chiefs and then briefly rebelled against the newly instituted British Government in 1869. He was caught, and was briefly confined at Attock, Punjab, only from late 1869 to May 1870, when he was released on parole in 1872. He was cleared and granted several honours thereafter, between 1872 and 1878. He was later also engaged in litigation against the Punjab Government and some relatives, until 1884. In order to obtain or get back some of his property claims in which he was partially successful, he was also granted various belated honours by the Government of India, including the personal title of Nawab Bahadur, additional jagir grants and revenues and an annual Jangi Inam (war award/allowance). He had also been given special powers as J.P. and area magistrate in Hazara in 1872. He married firstly, Ashraf Khanum, a Barakzai Durrani lady and married secondly (his cousin), Nur Shah Begum, a Tarin Afghan lady, only daughter of Hakim Khan Tarin in Talokar (a cousin of Sardar Habib Khan). He married thirdly to Khair Bibi Khanum, a Yusufzai Pathan lady. He died in December 1888. He had four sons as below:
    • Khanzada Abdel Aziz Khan, who died in 1827 (by Ashraf Khanam)
    • Khan Sahib Abdel Majid Khan (by Nur Shah Begum).
    • Jemadar Khanzada Abdel Latif Khan I.D.S.M. (by Khair Bibi Khanum). He served in the Punjab Regiment with the British Army, and received a posthumous I.D.S.M. (Indian Distinguished Services Medal). He got married and had one daughter. He died on 08 March 1916 at the battle of Dujaila, in Mesopotamia, during WWI.
    • Khanzada Abdel Rahim Khan (by Khair Bibi Khanum). He married Rahmat Jehan Begum, and had two sons. He died in 1942.
      • Khanzada Amin Khan (by Rahmat Jehan Begum). He married Mariam Begum, and had two sons and one daughter.
        • Shireen Khan (son).
        • Miskeen Khan (son).
        • Nasreen Bibi (daughter).
      • Khanzada Ibrahim Khan (by Rahmat Jehan Begum). He was born in 1941, educated at the local High School, landed proprietor of his share in the ancestral property of village Talokar, Haripur, Hazara, NWFP. He got married in Haripur, Hazara, NWFP (now KP), and has one son and one daughter.
        • Khanzada Muhammad Yousaf Khan Tareen. He got married and had four sons.
          • Fazal Kareem Khan. He is a landlord and is involved in agriculture business in Haripur, Pakistan.
          • Fazal Rahim Khan. He is serving as Mechanical Engineer at Arabian Cement, Saudi Arabia.
          • Muhammad Ali Khan. He is a business man in Bordeaux, France.
          • Muhammad Ashraf Khan. He is serving as Verification Engineer at Ericsson AB, Sweden.
        • Mst. Taj Khanum. She got married to a relative, Nisar Ahmed Khan of Nurdi village. The couple had one son.
          • Iftikhar Ahmed Khan
  • Khan Abdel Majid Khan S/o Sardar Habib Khan.........Dec 1888 - Sep 1939
  • Khan Sahib ABDEL MAJID KHAN O.B.E., Khan of Talokar (Khangi Jagir) was born in 1877. He was made a ward of the government under the Court of Wards until he attained his majority; initially educated privately under English tutors, then at Aitchison College, Lahore, in a mission school in Simla. He went to England in 1899 and qualified as a Barrister from Inns of Court, London in 1901. He joined the Punjab service and was appointed a Junior Magistrate, then a 1st Class Magistrate, Extra Assistant Commissioner and afterwards a Deputy Commissioner. He also served briefly as a Judge in the Punjab Sessions Courts and on retiring from service in 1934, he became an early and active member of the NWFP chapter of the All India Muslim League, also serving as a Member of the NWFP Legislative Assembly from 1936 to 1939. He was also a very active philanthropist, having supported the establishment of the Islamia College, Peshawar and various Indian Muslim charities. He played a considerable role in the early development of his native Haripur area in Hazara, NWFP. He founded several charitable schools, set up a public Tuberculosis ward at the Haripur Government Hospital, provided for a system of educational scholarships for local students as well as supporting numerous needy people. He got married and had three sons and two daughters. He died in September 1939 at Talokar.
    • Khan Sahib Abdel Salim Khan (see below).
    • Khanzada Abdul Hamid Khan. He married firstly, Sultana Khanam, a Tarin lady and married secondly, on 02 November 1961 to Ms. Hala Zarin Hamid Khan, a Punjabi Jat lady from Lahore. He had five sons.
      • Hafiez Khan (by Sultana Khanam), died at young age.
      • Waheed Khan (by Sultana Khanam), died at young age.
      • Abdul Mujeeb Khan (by Hala Zarin). He was born on 14 September 1963 at Abbottabad, NWFP, Pakistan. Graduated with a Bachelor's Degree in Law, presently (2010) working as a banker at the Bank of Punjab, Government of Punjab, Pakistan. He got married on 05 May 1993 at Lahore and had two daughters
        • Miss Aghana Khan
        • Miss Iza Khan
      • Abdul Haseeb Khan (by Hala Zarin). He was born on 28 February 1964 at Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan. He educated at the University of Glasgow (Masters of Law and Legislative) and presently (2010) working at the Ministry of Privatization Commission, Government of Pakistan as a Senior Legal Consultant. He got married on 04 August 2003 in Karachi, Sindh, and had two sons.
        • Abdul Wasey Khan
        • Abdul Dayan Khan
      • Abdul Naghib Khan (by Hala Zarin), born 15th June 1968 in Abbottabad, NWFP, Pakistan; graduated with an M.Sc. (Agricultural Economics), presently (2010) working in Iraq at ACDI/VOCA for USAID/Iraq Commuinty Action Programme as Director, Marla Ruzicka Iraqi War VictimsFund; married 7th July 2005, Amna Naghib Khan, and has issue. (Village Talokar, Haripur, Hazara, NWFP, Pakistan)
        Abdul Aaleem Khan
        Abdul Tahmeed Khan
    • Col. Khanzada Abdul Rashid Khan. He educated at the Indian Military Academy, Dehra Dun, he was given an Emergency/Wartime Commission in the British Indian Army, with effect from 14 July 1942, and served with 5th Cavalry, Pakistan Army after partition in 1947. He took early retirement in 1965. He got married in 1948 to Meimoona Khan and had one son. He died in 1969.
      • Imran Rashid Khan. He was born on 07 October 1950 and worked as a banker in Karachi, then U.A.E. and Egypt and then finally the U.K. He is now retired and settled in London, U.K. He got married in 1973 to Shahida Khan and had two sons.
        • Anouk Khan, born in December 1974.
        • Nayef Khan, born in September 1977.
    • Bibi Razia Sultan (deceased). She got married and children settled in U.K. and U.S.A.
    • Bibi Mushtari Sultan (deceased). She got married and had children settled in U.K. and U.S.A.
  • Khan Sahib Abdel Salim Khan.........................Sep 1939 - 1957
  • Born in 1907; a progressive thinker, he understood that a major change was afoot and he changed the familyís role accordingly, he believed that service, i.e. public service, was where old families had a role to play in modern Pakistan. He himself served as Pakistanís High Commissioner/Ambassador in several countries, including Afghanistan, Ceylon (Sri Lanka, Pakistan's first Ambassador there), Japan (he set up the Pakistan embassy there) and, as his last posting at the time of his death, Deputy High Commissioner in Britain (1957). He also undertook a number of charitable initiatives in his native area, including setting up a Boys School (primary to high school to serve 5 villages), a vocational college for men, two wards in the district hospital and also, a well-known agricultural research station for the development and improvement of farming and livestock. He got married to Begum Mahmooda Salim Khan (born in May 1913, died in June 2007 at Abbottabad), daughter of Capt. Sardar Sir Sikandar Hayat Khan, K.C.S.I. of the Wah family, and his first wife, Zubaida Khatun. He died 1957 and had two sons.
    • Khanzada Zahid Khan. He was born in March 1937 and overlooked in the succession. He got married and later divorced, Mrs. Anne W. Morrison of Virginia, U.S.A. The couple had three sons and one daughter as well as two adopted daughters. He died in 2002.
      • Christopher Khan. He was born in 1963. He got married and divorced. He had three sons settled in U.S.A.
        • Colton Khan
        • Kyler Khan
        • Lucas Khan
      • Robert Khan. He was born in 1965. Unmarried  and settled in U.S.A.
      • Elizabeth Khan [formerly Mrs. Elizabeth Whitney-Flew]. She was born in 1967. She worked with the Asia Foundation, and headed several small charitable concerns in the Northern Areas of Pakistan and Kashmir with her former husband; married (div.), Mr. Barry Flew. She is settled in Pakistan.
        Timothy Khan, born 1969, married (div.), and has issue, one daughter. (U.S.A.)
        • Lindsey Khan. She was born in 1994. She got married on 29 May 2016 at Davis, California, to Arthur Sanders. She is settle in California, USA.
      • Heather Khan. She was adopted in 1960.
      • Tamarah Khan. She was adopted in 1961. She got married to David Furness, and had one daughter.
        • Sairah Furness
    • Khan Sahib Javed Salim Khan (see below)
  • Khan Sahib Javed Salim Khan............................1957 - 1979
  • Khan Sahib JAVED SALIM KHAN C.S.P., Khan of Talokar (Khangi Jagir) was born in January 1939. He educated at the University of Cambridge, U.K. (Ph.D. Economics). He became Secretary of the Frontier Provincial Planning Department, the Federal (Pakistan) Planning Commission, the Pakistan Agricultural Development Board, and Pakistanís Representative to the F.A.O., Rome, Italy. He received awards for his services in Rome. He got married to Begum Shahwar Javed Salim Khan (born 1946 to a prominent social worker of the area, and an M.P. 1988-1993; daughter of Brig. Sardar Azmat Hayat Khan of the Wah family). He died in 1979 at Rome. He had three sons.
    • Khanzada Prof. Dr. Omer Salim Khan. He is a well-known literary figure, who writes under the pen name of 'Omer Tarin'; born on 10March 1967 in Peshawar. He educated at the Burn Hall School, Abbottabad and at Aitchison College, Lahore, Pakistan. Prior to graduating from the University of the Punjab, Lahore, he later obtained various higher degrees in English and History/Post-colonial Studies from Pakistan and the United Kingdom respectively. He became a full time university lecturer and research scholar and involved himself in literary and academic pursuits as well as limited social activism, especially in relation to environmental, forests and wildlife conservation, in his native area. He has published four volumes of poetry in English so far, namely. A Sad Piper (1994; 1996 UK), The Anvil of Dreams (1995), Burnt Offerings (1996, 1997) and The Harvest of Love Songs (1997, 2000; and UK ed 2003). Recent academic publications include works on military history/campaigns on the Frontier and some work on Rudyard Kipling and Kipling's India, published in the Kipling Journal, UK and the Journal of the Indian Military Historical Society, UK. He is a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society, UK, The Tolkien Society (UK), associate of the Kipling Society and the Indian Military Historical Society (IMHS). Currently he assists in running various family charities and is also managing a small research centre. He got married to the third daughter of Khan Muhammad Bakhtyar Khan of Mathana, Tanoli in Lassan Tanawal area of Amb state, a cousin of the present Nawab Salahuddin Saeed Khan of Amb. He had one daughter and two sons. His family is settled in Abbottabad, Pakistan.
      • Bibi Zainab Sultan Khanam (daughter)
      • Muhammad Hashim Khan (son)
      • Muhammad Haissam Khan (son)
    • Khanzada Usman Salim Khan. He was born in March 1969 at Lahore. He educated at the National College of Arts (B.F.A.). He became Pakistan CEO, Messrs Impact Design, Islamabad, Pakistan, which is one of the top design firms in the country. He became Member, Pakistan Association of Designers & Design Consultants. He got married (div. 2014), Syeda Bokhari of a Lahore Syed family and had two sons. He is settled in Islamabad, Pakistan.
      • Master Hussain Salim Khan
      • Master Zain Salim Khan
    • Khanzada Abid Salim Khan Tarin. He was born on 11 November 1971. He got married (div. 2002) in Islamabad. He educated with HSBA - Business Management (Punjab). He is presently (2011) operating a pharmaceuticals-related business in Lahore, Pakistan. He is a well-reputed equestrian and polo player of international standing; Member of the Executive, Equestrian Federation of Pakistan; Manager, Pakistan National Tent-Pegging Team, 2004-2009, which won several medals in Oman, Jordan, UAE, South Africa and Yemen. He has one daughter and one son. He is settled in Lahore, Pakistan.
      • Miss Naimal Khan
      • Master Haider Salim Khan
 
Source: http://members.iinet.net.au/~royalty/ips/d/dheritalokar.html (last updated 2016).
 
 
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