Bahawalpur
 
[Bahawalpur to 1945][Bahawalpur]
 
Bahawalpur was a princely state of the Punjab in what is now Pakistan, stretching along the southern bank of the Sutlej and Indus Rivers. It became part of Pakistan in 1947 and is divided into three districts: Bahawalpur, Rahimyar Khan and Bahawalnagar. The state was founded in 1690 by Bahadur Khan II. Nawab Mohammad Bahawal Khan III signed the state's first treaty with the British on 22 February 1833, guaranteeing the independence of the Nawab. The state acceded to Pakistan on 07 October 1947 and was merged into the province of West Pakistan on 14 October 1955.
Bahawalpur, it's capital is in Central Pakistan, is about 75 miles from the Indian frontier, the Nawabs (Governors, were effectively independent from the middle of the 18th century). This state comprises of an area of 45,911 Km2.
 
            1690           Bahawalpur State founded.
    
22 Feb 1833           British protectorate.
     07 Oct 1947           Bahawalpur accedes to Pakistan.
     14 Oct 1955           State extinguished.
 
  • Mughal Empire...........................................1526 - 1802
  • Banu'l - ABBAS or DAUDPUTRA  (Emirs, full title from 05 Jan 1740 Nawab Amir)
  • The Abbasi-Daudputras, from whom the ruling family of Bahawalpur came from, claim descent from the Abbasid Khalifs of Egypt. The tribe originally came from Sindh, and assumed independence during the decline of the Durrani Empire.
  • Bahadur Khan II.........................................1690 - 1702
  • Mubarak Khan I..........................................1702 - 1723 d. 1726
  • Sadiq Mohammed Khan I...................................1723 - 11 Apr 1746
  • Mohammed Bahawal Khan I..........................11 Apr 1746 - 12 Jun 1750
  • Mubarak Khan II..................................12 Jun 1750 - 04 Jun 1772
  • Mohammed Bahawal Khan II.........................04 Jun 1772 - 13 Aug 1809
  • The mint at Bahawalpur was opened in 1802 by Nawab Muhammad Bahawal Khan II with the permission of Shah Mahmud of Kabul. On the rise of Ranjit Singh, the Nawab, Muhammad Bahawal Khan III, made several unsuccessful appeals to the British for protection.
  • Sadiq Mohammed Khan II...........................13 Aug 1809 - 17 Apr 1826
  • However as part of the 1809 Treaty of Lahore, Ranjit Singh was confined to the right bank of the Sutlej.
  • Mohammad Bahawal III.............................17 Apr 1826 - 19 Oct 1852
  • The first treaty with Bahawalpur was negotiated in 1833, the year after the treaty with Ranjit Singh for regulating traffic on the Indus. It secured the independence of the Nawab within his own territories, and opened up the traffic on the Indus and Sutlej. The political relations of Bahawalpur with the paramount power, as at present existing, are regulated by a treaty made in October, 1838, when arrangements were in progress for the restoration of Shah Shuja to the Kabul throne. During the first Afghan War, the Nawab assisted the British with supplies and allowing passage and in 1847-1848 he co-operated actively with Sir Herbert Edwardes in the expedition against Multan. For these services he was rewarded by the grant of the districts of Sabzalkot and Bhung, together with a life-pension of a lakh. On his death a dispute arose regarding the succession. He was succeeded by his third son, whom he had nominated for the throne in place of his eldest son.
  • Sadiq Mohammed Khan III S/o M. Bahawal III.......19 Oct 1852 - 20 Feb 1853 d.1862
  • The new ruler was, however, deposed by his elder brother, and obtained asylum in British territory, with a pension from the Bahawalpur revenues; he broke his promise to abandon his claims, and was confined in the Lahore fort, where he died in 1862.
  • Fateh Mohammed Khan S/o M. Bahawal III...........20 Feb 1853 - 03 Oct 1858
  • Mohammad Bahawal Khan IV.........................03 Oct 1858 - 25 Mar 1866
  • In 1863 and 1866 insurrections broke out against the Nawab, caused by cruelty and misgovernment. The Nawab successfully crushed the rebellions; but in March, 1866, he died suddenly, not without suspicion of having been poisoned, and was succeeded by his son, Nawab Sadiq Muhammad Khan IV, a boy of four.
  • Sadiq Mohammed Khan IV S/o M. Bahawal Khan IV...25 Mar 1866 - 14 Feb 1899
  • After several endeavours to arrange for the administration of the country without active interference on the part of Government, it was found necessary, on account of disorganization and disaffection, to place the principality in British hands during his minority. The Nawab attained his majority in 1879, and was invested with full powers, with the advice and assistance of a council of six members. During the Afghan campaigns (1878-80) the Nawab placed the entire resources of his State at the disposal of the British Government, and a contingent of his troops was employed in keeping open communications, and in guarding the Dera Ghazi Khan frontier. On his death in 1899 he was succeeded by Muhammad Bahawal Khan V, who attained his majority in 1900, and was invested with full powers in 1903. The Nawab of Bahawalpur was entitled to a salute of 17 guns.
    • Begum Sahiba (female, Regent)...............25 Mar 1866 - 12 Feb 1879
    • Unknown Regent..............................14 Feb 1879 - 28 Nov 1879
  • Mohammed Bahawal Khan V..........................14 Feb 1899 - 15 Feb 1907
  • Born in 1883, son of Sadiq Mohammed Khan IV.
    • Leopold John Herbert Grey (Regent)..........14 Feb 1899 - 12 Nov 1903
    • He worked as a superintendent.
  • Sadiq Mohammed Khan V............................15 Feb 1907 - 14 Oct 1955
  • Born at Derawar on 29 September 1904, the only son and heir of Haji Nawab Muhammad Khan Abbasi V, Nawab of the state of Bahawalpur. When only two and a half, his father fell ill and died while at sea off the Aden coast, on 15 February 1907, leaving Sadeq as ruler of Bahawalpur. At the age of 15, Sadeq fought in the Third Afghan War in 1919, was knighted in 1922 when he reached his majority and was invested with the throne two years later by Lord Reading. Sir Sadeq continued his military career in the British Indian Army, which he had begun as a Lieutenant in 1921 ; by 1932 he was a Major, by 1941 a Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding troops in the Middle East during the Second World War. Since 1933, he had also been a Member of the Chamber of Princes, and since 1940, a member of the Indian Defence Council. Promoted to Major-General in 1946, the following year, on 15 August 1947, Sir Sadeq was promoted to the title of Amir of Bahawalpur. He acceded to the Dominion of Pakistan a month later. In 1953, Sir Sadeq represented Pakistan at the installation of Faisal II of Iraq and at the coronation of Elizabeth II. Two years later, Sir Sadeq was promoted to General in the Pakistani Army, and the same year, he merged his state into West Pakistan while continuing to hold ruling powers. He died in London on 24 May 1966, aged 61, following a reign of 59 years, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Haji Muhammad Abbas Khan Abbasi Bahadur.
    Full title: General His Highness Jalalat ul-Mulk, Rukn ud-Daula, Saif ud-Daula, Hafiz ul-Mulk, Mukhlis ud-Daula wa Muin ud-Daula, Al-Haji Nawab Sir Sadiq Muhammad Khan Abbasi V Bahadur, Nusrat-i-Jung, Amir of the God-gifted Kingdom of Bahawalpur, GCSI, GCIE, KCVO.
    • Maulvi Rahim Baksh (Regent).................15 Feb 1907 - 01 Oct 1922
    • He was president of the council regency.
  • Pakistan from 1948; Meditated 1955.
  • Pretenders
  • Sadiq Mohammed Khan V (continued)................14 Oct 1955 - 24 May 1966
  • HH Nawab Amir Muhammed Abbas Khan Abbasi.........24 May 1966 - 14 Apr 1988
  • Son of Sadiq Mohammad Khan V, born on 22nd March 1924 in Sadiqgarh Palace, Bahawalpur Distt. He got married with the daughter of Maulvi Shamsuddin.
  • HH Nawab Amir Salauddin Ahmad Khan Abbasi........14 Apr 1988 - date
  • Son of Muhammed Abbas Khan, born on 27th July 1946 at Al-Hilal, Kangra Valley. He has been elected five times as Member of National Assembly (MNA) from the city Ahmadpur East till 2012. Nawab Salahuddin Abbasi is also a strong campaigner of restoration of Bahawalpur province.
  • Prime Minister
  • Richard Marsh Croften...................................1942 - 1947 d.1955
  • Born in 1891. From 1945 onwards known as Sir Richard Marsh Croften.
  • John Dring..............................................1948 - 1952 (b.1902 - d.1991)
  • A. R. Khan..............................................1952 - 14 Oct 1955
Bahawalpur used the postage stamps of British India until 1945. On 01 January 1945, it issued its own stamps, for official use only, and continued to have various postal stamps till the end of October 1949.
 

Y#3.3 Rupee. 7.2g. Metal: Silver. Mint: Ahmadpur. Dated: 1281AH (1865 CE). Ruler: Anonymous issue citing Mahmud Shah during the reign of Nawab Amir Muhammad Bahawal Khan IV.

Y#7.1 Paisa 2.8g. Metal: Copper. Mint: Bahawalpur. Dated: 1327AH (1909-1910). Egde: Plain. Alignment: Coin. Obverse Persian Legends: Bahawalpur 1327. Reverse Legend: Nawab Sir Sadiq Muhammad Khan Khamas (fifth). Ruler: Sadiq Mohammed Khan V Abbasi.

Y#8 Paisa. 2.45g. Metal: Copper. Mint: Bahawalpur. Dated: 1342AH (1923-1924). Egde: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Obverse: Toughra. Ruler: Sadiq Mohammed Khan V Abbasi.

Y#12 1/2 Pice. 2.4g. Metal: Copper. Mint: Bahawalpur. Dated: 1359AH (1940). Egde: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Obverse: Bust of Al-Haj Sadiq Mohammed V Abbasi left. Reverse: Toughra. Ruler: Sadiq Mohammed Khan V Abbasi.

Y#13 1/4 Anna (Paisa). 4.85g. Metal: Copper. Mint: Bahawalpur. Dated: 1359AH (1940). Egde: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Obverse: Bust of Al-Haj Sadiq Mohammed V Abbasi left. Reverse: Toughra. Ruler: Sadiq Mohammed Khan V Abbasi.

Y#14 Rupee. 10.68g. Metal: Silver. Mint: Bahawalpur. Dated: 1343AH (1924-1925AD). Egde: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Obverse: Toughra. Ruler: Sadiq Muhammad Khan Abbasi V.

This coin is possibly known to be a pattern.

 
 
 
Pakistan's province of Punjab.
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