Petar I Karađorđević coinage: 1904-1920.
 
Peter I (Serbian: Petar/Петар; 11 July [O.S. 29 June] 1844 – 16 August 1921) reigned as the last King of Serbia (15 June 1903 – 01 December 1918) and as the first King of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (01 December 1918 – 16 August 1921). Peter was born in Belgrade, the fifth (born as third son) of Prince Alexander Karađorđević and his consort Persida Nenadović's ten children. He was the grandson of Karađorđe, the leader of the First Serbian Uprising (1804–1813) and the founder of the Karađorđević dynasty. Peter was not born in the Royal Court, which was undergoing renovations at the time, but at the home of merchant Miša Anastasijević. His birth was not met with much celebration because he was his parents' third son and his older brother Svetozar was the heir to the throne. His parents' oldest son, Aleksa, had died three years prior to Peter's birth, aged five, at which point Svetozar became heir. Peter did not become heir until Svetozar's death in 1847 at the age of six. Besides Belgrade, Peter spent much of his childhood in the town of Topola, from where the Karađorđević dynasty originated. He received his elementary education in Belgrade.
Prince Alexander Karađorđević, who was forced to abdicate. Peter lived with his family in exile. He fought with the French Foreign Legion in the Franco-Prussian War. He joined as volunteer under the alias Peter Mrkonjić in the Herzegovina Uprising (1875–77) against the Ottoman Empire.
He married Princess Zorka of Montenegro, daughter of King Nicholas, in 1883. She gave birth to his five children, including Prince Alexander. After the death of his father in 1885, Peter became head of the Karađorđević dynasty. After a military coup d'état and the murder of King Alexander I Obrenović in 1903, Peter became King of Serbia. As king, he advocated a constitutional setup for the country and was famous for his libertarian politics. Peter was crowned in St. Michael's Cathedral in Belgrade, on 21 September [O.S. 08 September] 1904.
King Peter was the supreme commander of the Serbian army in the Balkan wars. Because of his age, on 24 June 1914, he proclaimed his son, Alexander, heir to the throne, as regent. In the First World War he and his army retreated across Albania. Since he was the king of Serbia during a period of great Serbian military success, he was remembered by Serbian people as King Peter the Liberator, and also known as Old King.
On 01 December 1918, King Peter I was proclaimed King of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. King Peter stayed abroad until July 1919 and returned to Belgrade where he died in 1921 at the age of 77. He was solemnly buried in his endowment in Oplenac, the Church of Saint George in the vicinity of Topola in Central Serbia, where his grandfather Karageorge, the founder of the dynasty, launched a large-scale insurrection against the Ottomans in 1804.
Three cities in interwar Yugoslavia were named after King Peter I: Mrkonjić grad in Bosnia-Herzegovina (former Varcar Vakuf), Petrovgrad in Vojvodina (Veliki Bečkerek, now Zrenjanin) and Petrovac na Moru (former Kaštel Lastva) in Montenegro. Dozens of monuments erected in his honor throughout Yugoslavia were destroyed after the communist takeover in 1945. Only one monument, in Zrenjanin (former Petrovgrad) was recently restored, as well as several smaller monuments in Belgrade and the rest of Serbia. The other monuments in honor to King Peter I were restored or erected in Republika Srpska, in Bosnia-Herzegovina where his cult status as a national hero is as strong as in Serbia. In Paris, an avenue off the Champs-Élysées is named after him, Avenue Pierre Ier de Serbie. There is a modest monument dedicated to King Petar I of Serbia in Orléans, France, when he fought as a volunteer in the French army. A large monument to King Peter and his son Alexander I of Yugoslavia was unveiled in 1936, at the Porte de la Muette in Paris.
 
 
King of Serbia (15 June 1903 – 01 December 1918)
Currency: Dinar = 100 para
In 1901 the Serbian Dinar was equal to the French Franc or 19.3 cents in United States money.
 
1904
 

Serbia KM#23 2 para. Year: 1904. Weight: 1.97 g [2.00 g]. Metal: Bronze. Diameter: 20.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: N.A. Obverse: "КРАЉЕВИНА СРБИЈА" (Kingdom of Serbia) written at the top section. Numeral "2" in the center with "*ПАРА*" (para) written at the bottom. Date "1904" written clockwise at the below right side. Reverse: Crowned heraldic eagle in the center. Mintage: 12,500,000. Mintage Years: One year type.

Serbia KM#26.1 2 Dinara. Year: 1904. Weight: 9.93 g [10.00 g]. Metal: 0.835 Silver. Diameter: 26.50 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Vienna, Austria. Obverse: Crown at the top. Numeral "2" in the center with "ДИНАРА" (Dinara) written below. Date "1904" below the Value. Value and Date within wreath of laurel and oak tied with ribbon below.
Reverse: Petar I's portrait facing right in the center. "ПЕТАР I. КРАЉ СРБИЈЕ" (Petar I, King of Serbia) written clockwise around the portrait. "SCHWARTZ" written below the neck. Mintage: 1,150,044 + N.A. Proofs. Mintage Years: 1904, 1912, 1915 (medal alignment; with privy mark), 1915 (KM#26.2 medal alignment; without signature, with privy mark), 1915 (KM#26.3 coin alignment; with signature) and 1915 (KM#26.3 coin alignment; with signature; with privy mark). Engraver: Stefan Schwartz (both sides).

Note: Prof. Stephan Schwartz belong to the Vienna School of Arts where he was Professor of Sculpture and Modal Engraving.

 
1912
 

Serbia KM#18 5 para. Year: 1912. Weight: 3.01 g [3.00 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 17.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: N.A. Obverse: Numeral "5" in the center. "КРАЉЕВИНА СРБИЈА 1912" (The Kingdom of Serbia with Date) written at the top section. "*ПАРА*" (para) written at the bottom.
Reverse: Crowned heraldic eagle in the center. Mintage: N.A. Mintage Years: 1883, 1884H, 1904, 1912 and 1917G (1883 and 1884H are Coin alignment coins while others dates are Medal alignment).

Serbia KM#19 10 para. Year: 1912. Weight: 3.98 g [4.00 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 20.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: N.A. Obverse: Numeral "10" in the center. "КРАЉЕВИНА СРБИЈА 1912" (The Kingdom of Serbia with Date) written at the top section. "*ПАРА*" (para) written at the bottom.

Reverse: Crowned heraldic eagle in the center. Mintage: N.A. Mintage Years: 1883, 1884H, 1904, 1912 and 1917G (1883 and 1884H are Coin alignment coins while others dates are Medal alignment).

Serbia KM#20 20 para. Year: 1912. Weight: 5.95 g [6.00 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 22.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: N.A. Obverse: Numeral "20" in the center. "КРАЉЕВИНА СРБИЈА 1912" (The Kingdom of Serbia with Date) written at the top section. "*ПАРА*" (para) written at the bottom.
Reverse: Crowned heraldic eagle in the center. Mintage: N.A. Mintage Years: 1883, 1884H, 1904, 1912 and 1917G (1883 and 1884H are Coin alignment coins while others dates are Medal alignment).

Serbia KM#25.1 1 Dinar. Year: 1912. Weight: 4.96 g [5.00 g]. Metal: 0.835 Silver. Diameter: 22.50 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Kremnitz (Kremnica), Slovakia. Obverse: Crown at the top. Numeral "1" in the center with "ДИНАР" (Dinar) written below. Date "1912" below the Value. Value and Date within wreath of laurel and oak tied with ribbon below.
Reverse: Petar I's portrait facing right in the center. "ПЕТАР I. КРАЉ СРБИЈЕ" (Petar I, King of Serbia) written clockwise around the portrait. "SCHWARTZ" written below the neck. Mintage: 8,000,000. Mintage Years: 1904 (KM#25.1 medal alignment), 1912 (KM#25.1 medal alignment), 1915 (KM#25.1 medal alignment; with privy mark), 1915 (KM#25.2 medal alignment; without designer's name; with privy mark), 1915 (KM#25.3 coin alignment; with privy mark) and 1915 (KM#25.4 coin alignment; without designer's name; with privy mark). Engraver: Stefan Schwartz (both sides).
 
1915
On July 28, 1914 the Austrians declared War on Serbia, thus the beginning of the Great War of 1914-1918 (World War I). The Austrian Army occupied Belgrade, the capital of Serbia, on December 02, 1914, but evacuated it December 15, after a prolonged battle in which the Serbians were victorious. On October 09, 1915, Belgrade again fell into the hands of Austria-Hungary Empire.
 

Serbia KM#24.3 50 para. Year: 1915. Weight: 2.49 g [2.50 g]. Metal: 0.835 Silver. Diameter: 18.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Paris. Obverse: Crown at the top. Numeral "2" in the center with "ПАРА" (para) written below. Date "1915" below the Value. Value and Date within wreath of laurel and oak tied with ribbon below.
Reverse: Petar I's portrait facing right in the center. "ПЕТАР I. КРАЉ СРБИЈЕ" (Petar I, King of Serbia) written clockwise around the portrait. "SCHWARTZ" written below the neck. Mint mark Cornucopia at bottom left side and Torch at the bottom right side. Mintage: N.A. Mintage Years: 1904 (KM#24.1 medal alignment), 1912 (KM#24.1 medal alignment), 1915 (KM#24.1 medal alignment; with privy mark), 1915 (KM#24.2 medal alignment; without designer's name; with privy mark), 1915 (KM#24.4 coin alignment; without designer's name; with privy mark) and 1915 (KM#24.3 coin alignment). Engraver (Torch): Henri Auguste Patey. Designer: Stefan Schwartz (both sides).

Note: The Great World War I (1914-1918) brought to a close the small silver coinage of most countries, except Switzerland and a few other mostly Western Hemisphere countries, as the price of silver increased above the denomination value of the coinage.

  • KM#24.1 (medal alignment; with privy mark) were issued by Paris mint in 1915 with mintage: 7,901,068 and with frozen date (1915) in 1916 with Mintage: 4,236,860.
  • KM#24.2 (medal alignment; without designer's name; with privy mark) were issued by Paris mint with frozen date (1915) in 1917 with Mintage: 1,862,072.

Serbia KM#26.3 2 Dinara. Year: 1915. Weight: 9.98 g [10.00 g]. Metal: 0.835 Silver. Diameter: 27.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Paris. Obverse: Crown at the top. Numeral "2" in the center with "ДИНАРА" (Dinara) written below. Date "1915" below the Value. Value and Date within wreath of laurel and oak tied with ribbon below.

Reverse: Petar I's portrait facing right in the center. "ПЕТАР I. КРАЉ СРБИЈЕ" (Petar I, King of Serbia) written clockwise around the portrait. "SCHWARTZ" written below the neck. Mint mark Cornucopia at bottom left side and Torch at the bottom right side. Mintage:  N.A. Mintage Years: 1915 (KM#26.3 coin alignment; with signature) and 1915 (KM#26.3 coin alignment; with signature; with privy mark). Engraver (Torch): Henri Auguste Patey. Designer: Stefan Schwartz (both sides).

 
King of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (01 December 1918 – 16 August 1921)
 
The State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs (Serbo-Croatian: Država Slovenaca, Hrvata i Srba/Држава Словенаца, Хрвата и Срба; Slovene: Država Slovencev, Hrvatov in Srbov) was a short-lived entity formed at the end of World War I by Slovenes, Croats and Serbs residing in what were the southernmost parts of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Although internationally unrecognized, this was the first incarnation of a Yugoslav state and had been founded on the Pan-Slavic ideology behind the initiative. A month after it was proclaimed, the State joined the Kingdom of Serbia to form the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.
The Serbs identified in the name were those resident in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia-Slavonia, Syrmia and Dalmatia (including Boka Kotorska and Montenegrin Littoral as far as Spič, near Bar, Montenegro), not those residing in the Kingdom of Serbia (which included the territory of the present-day Republic of Macedonia), nor those living in the Kingdom of Montenegro or Vojvodina (including Banat, Bačka and Baranja).
The State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs did not obtain international diplomatic recognition before it ceased to exist. In a note of 31 October 1918, the National Council informed the governments of the United Kingdom, France, Italy and the United States that the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs was constituted in the South-Slavic areas that had been part of Austria-Hungary, and that the new state intended to form a common state with Serbia and Montenegro. The same note was sent to the government of the Kingdom of Serbia and the Yugoslav Committee in London. Serbia's prime minister Nikola Pašić responded to the note on 8 November, recognizing the National Council in Zagreb as "legal government of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes living in the territory of the Austria-Hungary", and notified the governments of the United Kingdom, France, Italy and the United States asking them to do the same.
On 23–24 November 1918, the National Council declared "unification of the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs formed on the entire, contiguous South-Slavic area of the former Austria-Hungary with the Kingdom of Serbia and Montenegro into a unified State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs". 28 members of the council were appointed to implement that decision based on National Council's adopted directions on implementation of the agreement of organization of the unified state with the government of the Kingdom of Serbia and representatives of political parties in Serbia and Montenegro. The instructions were largely ignored by the delegation members who negotiated with Regent Alexander instead.
Stjepan Radić's Peasant Party participated in the National Council, but after it decided to merge with Serbia, they started to back off, calling the move foolish, and disputing the decision based on the fact that the Croatian Parliament never explicitly approved it. On 01 December 1918, Regent Alexander proclaimed unification of "Serbia with lands of the independent State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs into a unified Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes". As the National Council ceased to operate, it never formally ratified the proclamation, nor did the Parliament of Serbia, which took note of the declaration on 29 December 1918. The National Council's final important task was to appoint representatives to the Temporary National Representation in early 1919.

On 29 December 1918, Parliament of Serbia approves act of unification, therefore on 24 August 1920, Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes was official created. On 03 October 1929 it was renamed and simplified as Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

 
1920
 

Yugoslavia KM#2 10 para. Year: 1920. Weight: 3.17 g [3.15 g]. Metal: Zinc. Diameter: 20.85 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Vienna, Austria. Obverse: Double cornucopia, either side of caduceus at the top. Numeral "10" in the center. "ПАРА" (para) written clockwise at the left side. "PARA" written clockwise at the right side. Date written at the bottom. Reverse: Crowned and mantled arms on shield in the center. Mintage: 58,946,122. Mintage Years: One year type. Closed letter "П" type.

Engraver: Joseph Prinz (Value and date side) and Adolf Hofmann (Coat and Arms side).

Note: Two varieties exist: Closed letter "П" and opened letter "П" in "ПАРА".

Yugoslavia KM#3 25 para. Year: 1920. Weight: 5.65 g [5.70 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 24.30 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Vienna, Austria. Obverse: Double cornucopia, either side of caduceus at the top. Numeral "25" in the center. "ПАРА" (para) written clockwise at the left side. "PARA" written clockwise at the right side. Date written at the bottom. Reverse: Crowned and mantled arms on shield in the center. Mintage: 48,173,138. Mintage Years: One year type.

Engraver: Joseph Prinz (Value and date side) and Adolf Hofmann (Coat and Arms side).

 
 
Click on below links to view coinage used by Serbia:
  • OBRENOVIĆ
  • Mihailo [Michael] Obrenović III (2nd time)............26 Sep 1860 - 10 Jun 1868
  • Milan II [Milan Obrenović IV] (King from 1882)........02 Jul 1868 - 06 Mar 1889
  • Aleksandar............................................06 Mar 1889 - 11 Jun 1903
  • KARAGEORGEVIĆ
  • Peter I (King of Serbs, Croats, & Slovenes from 1918).15 Jun 1903 - 16 Aug 1921
  • Aleksandar (Kingdom of Yugoslavia from 1929)..........16 Aug 1921 - 09 Oct 1934
  • Peter II..............................................09 Oct 1934 - 29 Nov 1945
  • Occupied Territory and Federal Republic
  • German occupation.....................................13 Apr 1941 - 20 Oct 1944
  • Democratic Federative Yugoslavia......................29 Nov 1943 - 29 Nov 1945
  • Federative People's Republic of Yugoslavia............29 Nov 1945 - 07 Apr 1963
  • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia..............07 Apr 1963 - 27 Apr 1992
  • Federal Republic of Yugoslavia........................27 Apr 1992 - 04 Feb 2003
  • Serbia and Montenegro.................................04 Feb 2003 - 03 Jun 2006
  • Republic of Serbia....................................05 Jun 2006 - date
 
 
 
 
Countries / Territories
 
Chiefa Coins