East Caribbean States
 
The Eastern Caribbean dollar (symbol: $; code: XCD) is the currency of all six full members: Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and two associate member (British overseas territories): Anguilla and Montserrat of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS). These states are all members of the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union. The other two associate members of the OECS do not use the Eastern Caribbean Dollar as their official currency: the British Virgin Islands (uses: US Dollar) and Martinique (uses Euro). The Eastern Caribbean Dollar is successor to the British West Indies Dollar, it has existed since 1965, and it is normally abbreviated with the Dollar sign $ or, alternatively, EC$ to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies. The EC$ is subdivided into 100 cents. It has been pegged to the United States dollar since 07 July 1976, at the exchange rate of US$ 1 = EC$ 2.70.
In 1951, the
British Virgin Islands adopted the British West Indies dollar which at that time operated in conjunction with the sterling coinage, and in 1959 they changed over officially to the U.S. dollar.
British Guiana (now
Guyana) and Barbados had previously been members of the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union but withdrew in 1966 and 1972, respectively. Trinidad and Tobago had been a member of the earlier British West Indies currency union, but withdrew in 1964.
 
 
British West Indies coinage: 1820-1822
Currency: Anchor Dollar [1820-1822].
Queen Anne's proclamation of 1704 introduced the gold standard to the British West Indies, putting the West Indies about two hundred years ahead of the East Indies in this respect. Nevertheless, silver pieces of eight continued to form an important portion of the circulating coinage right up until the late 1870s. During 1820-1822, the British government coined 1⁄4, ​1⁄8, and ​1⁄16 fractional 'Anchor dollars' for use in Mauritius and the British West Indies (but not Jamaica). 1/2 Dollar was introduced in 1821-1822. A few years later copper fractional dollars were coined for Mauritius, Sierra Leone, and the British West Indies.
 

KM#1 1/16 Dollar. Year: 1822. Weight: 1.56g [1.74 g]. Metal: 0.892 Silver. Diameter: 15.75 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: British Royal Mint, London, UK.
Obverse: Crown above Anchor in the center. "COLONIAR: BRITAN: MONET:" (translate: Colonial money of Britain) written in circular form, near the edge. "XVI" (16) written on both sides of the Anchor. Date "1822" written at the bottom. Reverse: Coat of arms on ornate shield in the center. "GEORGIVS IV D:G: BRITANNIARUM REX F:D:" (Full text: GEORGIVS IV DEI GRATIA BRITANNIARUM REX FIDEI DEFENSOR. translate: George the Fourth, by the Grace of God, King of the British, Defender of the Faith) written in circular form, near the edge. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1820, 1820 Proof, 1820/1, 1822, 1822 overdate variety and 1822 Proof. Ruler: George IV.

George IV (George Augustus Frederick; b. 12 August 1762 – d. 26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover from the death of his father, King George III, on 29 January 1820 until his own death ten years later on 26 June 1830. From 1811 until his accession, he served as regent during his father's final mental illness.

Additional Note: The ‘Anchor Coins' do not bear a particular place identification. They were issued for use in various British colonies in both the New World and the Orient. Coins of this type dated 1820 are traditionally assigned to Mauritius and other holdings in the Indian Ocean. Those of 1822 were initially struck for Mauritius but after the introduction of sterling as the denomination of public accounts in Mauritius, they found their widest circulation in Canada and colonies in the Caribbean Sea. In Jamaica they were limited to military transactions only. In the Leeward Islands they were used on the British islands (Anguilla + Antigua and Barbuda + Montserrat + Saint Kitts and Nevis, except the Virgin Islands), Windward Islands (Dominica + Saint Lucia + Saint Vincent and the Grenadines + Grenada), Barbados, Tobago and Trinidad.

 
 
Currency: (1825-1949).
6 Black Dogs = 4 Stampees = 1 Bit = 9 Pence.
8 Shillings, 3 Pence = 11 Bits = 8 Reales.
108 Pence = 12 Bits = 9 Shillings = 1 Dollar.
100 Cents = 1 Dollar.
6 Livres 15 Sous (15.00 grams cut of Spanish / Spanish Colonial coin) with Countermark: "S:Lucie" for Saint Lucia.
 
Examples of Countermark on French and Spanish coins:
  • 1-1/2 PENCE (Black Dog) - Countermark on French and French Guiana, Colony of Cayenne 2 Sous.
  • 9 PENCE (Bit) - Countermark on 1/2 cut of Spanish or Spanish Colonial 2 Reales.
  • SHILLING (1/8 DOLLAR) - Countermark on 1/8 cut of Spanish or Spanish Colonial 8 Reales.
  • 2 SHILLING (1/4 DOLLAR) - Countermark on 1/4 cut of Spanish or Spanish Colonial 8 Reales.
  • 4 SHILLING 1-1/2 PENCE (1/2 DOLLAR) - Countermark on 1/2 cut of Spanish or Spanish Colonial 8 Reales.
 
Countermark Symbols:

Tortola Island of British Virgin Island, has an area of about 24 sq. mi. (62 sq. km.), is the largest of 36 islands. Tortola has "T" Countermark on French 2 Sous coins, "TORTOLA" in odd shaped rectangle, "TIRTILA" and "TIRTILA with inverted V for A" on Spanish cut coins. Countermark: "S:Lucie" is known for Saint Lucia. Similarly various small countermark symbols were used by other British Caribbean Islands.
 
The first move to introduce British sterling silver coinage to the colonies came with an imperial order-in-council dated 1825. This move was inspired by a number of factors. The United Kingdom was now operating a very successful gold standard in relation to the gold sovereign that was introduced in 1816, and there was a desire to extend this system to the colonies. In addition to this, there was the fact that the supply of Spanish dollars (pieces of eight) had been cut off as a result of the revolutions in Latin America where most of the Spanish dollars were minted. The last Spanish Dollar was in fact minted at Potosi in 1825. There was now a growing desire to have a stable and steady supply of British shillings everywhere the British drum was beating. The 1825 order-in-council was largely a failure because it made sterling silver coinage legal tender at the unrealistic rating in relation to the Spanish dollar of $1 = 4 shillings 4 pence. It succeeded in Jamaica, Bermuda, and British Honduras because the authorities in those territories set aside the official ratings and used the more realistic rating of $1 = 4 shillings. The reality of the rating between the dollar and the pound was based on the silver content of the Spanish pieces of eight as compared to the gold content of the British gold sovereign.
A second imperial order-in-council was passed in 1838 with the correct rating of $1 = 4 shillings 2 pence. In the years following the 1838 order-in-council, the British West Indies territories began to enact local legislation for the purposes of assimilating their monies of account with the British pound sterling. Gold discoveries in Australia in 1851 drove the silver dollar out of the West Indies, but it returned again with the great depreciation in the value of silver that followed with Germany's transition to the gold standard between 1871 and 1873. In the years immediately following 1873, there was a fear that the British West Indies might return to a silver standard. As such, legislation was passed in the individual territories to demonetize the silver dollars. Even though the British coinage was also silver, it represented fractions of the gold sovereign and so its value was based on a gold standard.
During this period, and into the nineteenth century, accounts could be kept in either dollars or sterling. Jamaica, Bermuda, and the Bahamas preferred to use sterling accounts whereas British Guiana used dollar accounts. British Guiana used dollar accounts for the purpose of assisting in the transition from the Dutch guilder system of currency to the British pound sterling system. In the Eastern Caribbean territories the private sector preferred to use dollar accounts whereas the government preferred to use sterling accounts. In some of the Eastern Caribbean territories, notes were issued by various private banks, denominated in dollars equivalent to 4 shillings 2 pence.
In 1946, a West Indian Currency Conference saw Barbados, British Guiana, the Leeward Islands, Trinidad and Tobago and the Windward Islands agree to establish a unified decimal currency system based on a West Indian dollar to replace the current arrangement of having three different Boards of Commissioners of Currency [for Barbados (which also served the Leeward and Windward Islands), British Guiana and Trinidad & Tobago].
 
"British Guiana and West Indies" coinage: 1891-1916.
After the introduction of the dollar, regular British coins circulated, together with 2 and 4 pence coins also issued elsewhere in the British West Indies. The 2 pence (in British Guiana, they were equivalent to 1/8 guilder) coins issued in 1838, 1843 and 1848 were of the standard Maundy money type, whilst the 4 pence coins bore an image of Britannia. 4 pence coins were issued specifically for "British Guiana and West Indies" during 1891-1916 and for "British Guiana" during 1917-1945. By Royal Proclamation of 10 May 1917 the coins were only for British Guiana; the 1917 issue was made on 30 June 1917 (Annual Report of the Deputy Master and Comptroller of the Royal Mint, 1917 p. 12).
 
1891
 

KM#26 Pridmore 32 Four Pence. Year: 1891. Weight: 1.86g [1.8851 g]. Metal: 0.925 Silver. Diameter: 16.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, London, UK.
Obverse: Crown almost at the top position. Value "FOUR PENCE" written in two lines within the Oak Wreath in the center. "BRITISH GUIANA AND WEST INDIES" written outside the Oak Wreath in circular form. Date "1891" written at the bottom, below the Wreath knot. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Victoria, wearing coronet and facing left in the center. "VICTORIA" written on the right clockwise. "QUEEN" written on the left clockwise. Mintage: 336,000. Minted Years: 1891, 1894, 1900 and 1901. Engraver: Leonard Charles Wyon (Queen Victoria portrait side).

Leonard Charles Wyon (b. London 23 November 1826 – d. London 20 August 1891) was a British engraver of the Victorian era most notable for his work on the gold and silver coinage struck for the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1887 and the bronze coinage of 1860 with the second ("bun") head portrait, in use from 1860 to 1894.
The eldest son of chief engraver William Wyon and his wife, Catherine Sophia, née Keele (d. 1851), Leonard Charles Wyon was born in one of the houses in the Royal Mint in 1826, and was educated at Merchant Taylors' School. L.C. Wyon's father taught him art and also from his father he inherited great skill in die engraving. By the age of 16 he had already made several medals and some of his early work is displayed in the British Museum's Numismatic collection. He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1843. From 1844 he studied at the Royal Academy Schools and in the same year, at the age of just 18, he became Second Engraver under his father at the Royal Mint. One of his earliest medals to be widely praised was his 1846 medal of the Irish Temperance preacher Theobald Mathew. In 1850 he was commissioned by Queen Victoria to make medallic portraits of the royal children, and in 1851 he executed the reverse of the prize-medal for The Great Exhibition. Also in 1851, at the age of 24, he succeeded his father, who had died, with the title of Modeller and Engraver. In 1854 he engraved the 'William Wyon Laudatory Medal', in memory of his father, for the Art Union of London. Like his father before him, he also produced dies for postage and other stamps.
Wyon submitted a number of designs to the Queen for her approval, one of which she adopted known as Wyon's 'Bun Head' (Victoria's hair style) penny introduced in 1860. It shows his initials L.C.W. beneath Britannia's foot.
L. C. Wyon also engraved the dies for the gold and silver coinage struck for the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1887. This coinage, the designs for which were prepared from life by Sir Joseph Boehm, RA, produced a storm of disapproval, directed particularly against Boehm's portrait of the Queen.
Wyon, like his father William before him, prepared many dies for coinage use in various parts of the British Empire, including those for Australia, British East Africa, British Guiana, the West Indies, British Honduras, British India; the British India Native States of Alwar, Bikanir, Dwas and Dgar; Canada, Ceylon, Cyprus, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Jersey, Malta, Mauritius, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and the Straits Settlements. His official medals included the South Africa Medal (1853), the Arctic and Baltic Medals, the Indian Mutiny Medal, and the South Africa Medal (1879). Among his portrait medals are those of William Wordsworth (1848), Robert Stephenson (1850), Joseph Paxton (1854), Richard Sainthill (1855), Henry Hallam (1859), and William Ewart Gladstone (1879).
On 22 June 1852 Wyon married Mary Birks (1831–1902) and the couple lived in London, first in Maida Vale and from 1856 in St John's Wood. None of their numerous offspring took up their father's profession.
At the age of 64, Leonard Charles Wyon died of Bright's disease and apoplexy at his home, 54 Hamilton Terrace, St John's Wood, London, on 20 August 1891 and was buried at Paddington Old Cemetery.

 
 
British Caribbean Territories - Eastern Group (1955-1965)
 
Currency: British West Indies Dollar = 100 cents. [1949-1965]
In 1949, the British government formalized the dollar system of accounts in British Guiana and the Eastern Caribbean territories by introducing the British West Indies dollar (BWI$) at the already existing conversion rate of $4.80 per pound sterling (or $1 = 4 shillings 2 pence). It was one of the many experimental political and economic ventures tested by the British government to form a uniform system within the British West Indies territories. The symbol "BWI$" for frequently used and the currency was known verbally as the "Beewee" (slang for British West Indies) dollar. Shortly thereafter in the 1950, the British Caribbean Currency Board (BCCB) was set up in Trinidad with the sole right to issue notes and coins of the new unified currency and given the mandate of keeping full foreign exchange cover to ensure convertibility at $4.80 per pound sterling. In 1951, the British Virgin Islands joined the arrangement, but this led to discontent because that territory was more naturally drawn to the currency of the neighbouring U.S. Virgin Islands. In 1961, the British Virgin Islands withdrew from the arrangement and adopted the U.S. Dollar.
From 1949-1955, the BWI$ existed only as banknotes in conjunction with sterling fractional coinage. Decimal coins replaced the sterling coins in 1955. These decimal coins were denominated in cents, with each cent worth one halfpenny in sterling.
In 1958, the West Indies Federation was established and the BWI$ was its currency. However, although Jamaica (including the Cayman Islands and the Turks and Caicos Islands) was part of the West Indies Federation, it retained the Jamaican pound, despite adopting the BWI$ as legal tender from 1954. Jamaica, the Cayman Islands, and the Turks and Caicos Islands were already long established users of the sterling accounts system of pounds, shillings, and pence.
In 1964 Jamaica ended the legal tender status of the BWI$ and Trinidad and Tobago withdrew from the currency union (adopting the Trinidad and Tobago dollar) forcing the movement of the headquarters of the BCCB to Barbados and soon the "BWI$" dollar lost its regional support.
On 06 October 1965, the British West Indies dollar of the now defunct West Indies Federation was replaced at par by the Eastern Caribbean dollar and the BCCB was replaced by the Eastern Caribbean Currency Authority or ECCA (established by the Eastern Caribbean Currency Agreement 1965). British Guiana withdrew from the currency union the following year. Grenada, which had used the Trinidad and Tobago dollar from 1964, rejoined the common currency arrangement in 1968. Barbados withdrew from the currency union in 1972, following which the ECCA headquarters were moved to St. Kitts.
 
1955
Coins were introduced in 1955 in denominations of ​1⁄2, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25 and 50 cents, minted under the name of "British Caribbean Territories, Eastern Group". The ​1⁄2, 1, and 2 cent coins were bronze and of the same weight and diameter as British Pound Sterling farthing, ​1⁄2 penny, and 1 penny coins. The 5 cents coin was brass while the 10, 25, and 50 cents were cupro-nickel. These coins remained in circulation until 1981, with the exception of the ​1⁄2 cent, which was withdrawn in 1965. All coins bore the image of Queen Elizabeth II.

KM#1 / Schön# 1 Half Cent. Year: 1955. Weight: 2.86g [2.83 g]. Metal: Bronze. Diameter: 20.00 mm. Thickness: 1.25 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES" written at the top section. Value "1/2 CENT" written in the center with Date "1955" below it. "·EASTERN GROUP·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: 500,000 + 2,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1955 and 1958. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Cecil Walter Thomas (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

Thomas Humphrey Paget OBE (13 August 1893 – 30 April 1974) was an English medal and coin designer and modeller. Paget's designs are indicated by the initials 'HP'.
Paget was first approached by the Royal Mint in 1936 after the accession of King Edward VIII. Paget's recommendation had come via his earlier design for the obverse of a medal featuring the then-Prince of Wales. After some controversy regarding the direction the monarch was to face on the coinage (it had been tradition for each successive monarch to face in the opposite direction to the predecessor, but the King felt that the features of his left were better than his right), Paget's work was approved in two slightly differing designs: one for silver and another for non-silver. However Edward's abdication meant that, apart from a few trial pieces, Paget's designs never reached the minting stage. Some did find their way out of the Mint for testing purposes, and as such have become amongst the rarest and most collectable pieces of all sterling coinage.
A measure of the success of the Edward portrait can be seen in the fact that Paget alone was commissioned to design George VI's effigy in 1937. He is the only artist to have a second obverse design approved for use in sterling coinage in the 20th century. The portrait of George VI has since been described as "the classic coinage head of the 20th century".
Although principally known as an obverse designer, Paget carried out some work for reverses, including most famously a design featuring the Elizabethan galleon the Golden Hind. Originally intended for the halfcrown, it was adopted for the halfpenny in 1937 where it remained until it was withdrawn in 1969 (in readiness for decimalisation in 1971).
He was awarded the O.B.E. (Civil) in the King's Birthday Honours of 1948. His O.B.E. was gazetted in the Supplement to The London Gazette, Number 38311, Page 3377, published on 04 June 1948. Paget later designed a wide variety of issues for both Commonwealth and non-Commonwealth countries. Notable amongst his later work included an effigy of King Faisal II of Iraq in 1955 and the 1970 Commonwealth Games medal which featured the Duke of Edinburgh. He also produced an effigy of Queen Elizabeth II for a commemorative Isle of Man issue in 1965. Paget's work remains part of current sterling circulation: his 1970 portrait of the Duke of Edinburgh appears on the reverse of a 2017 commemorative five pound coin.

Cecil Walter Thomas, OBE FRBS, (03 March 1885 – 16 September 1976) was a British sculptor and medallist. As a sculptor, he created many private memorials for display in churches and cemeteries and as a medallist was regularly commissioned by the Royal Mint.
Thomas was a regular exhibitor at the Royal Academy, starting in 1909, and at the Royal Society of Miniature Painters, Sculptors and Gravers, of which he became an associate in 1914 and a fellow the following year. He also exhibited at the Grosvenor Gallery in London, the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool, Manchester City Gallery, the Salon in Paris, and at shows in the United States.
During the First World War, Thomas joined the British Army, initially serving as a staff officer. He was observed by his superiors using sand models to demonstrate plans to his men and transferred to a military intelligence position. He was seriously wounded later in the war and returned to his medal-making during his recovery. After the war, he received a commissioned for a recumbent effigy from a lord and lady, in memory of their two sons. This resulted in many more commissions for funerary bronze effigies. Several are on display in churches including All Hallows-by-the-Tower in the City of London; Christ Church Cathedral in Newcastle, New South Wales; and Exbury Church in Hampshire. As well as private memorials, Thomas created effigies of multiple public figures, including Randall Davidson, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury Cathedral; Bishop Edward Talbot in Southwark Cathedral; Admiral Philip Nelson-Ward at Boxgrove Priory church; and Reverend Prebendary Boyd in St Alban's Church, Teddington. He also designed a war memorials for the St John Ambulance Brigade at St John's Gate, Clerkenwell. He was made a fellow of the Royal Society of British Sculptors (now the Royal British Society of Sculptors) in 1938.
Thomas volunteered for the Royal Air Force at the outbreak the Second World War, serving in the model-making section at RAF Medmenham in Buckinghamshire, interpreting aerial photographs into terrain models. He was demobilised in 1945, having reached the age of 60.
In 1946, Thomas became Master of the Art Workers Guild and in 1953 was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire.
In his later career, Thomas received many commissions for coins and medals from the Royal Mint. Upon the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953, Thomas won the competition to design the new coinage but in the end his designs were only used on two British coins, the florin (two shillings) and the sixpence, and Thomas was asked to refine the designs of other artists. Nonetheless, his designs were used on coinage in several Commonwealth countries including Hong Kong and Nigeria. Disaffected by his experience, Thomas declined a commission to design Britain's post-decimalisation coinage.
Despite his disaffection with coin-making, Thomas continued to design many medals for the Royal Mint, including the Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal, the Queen's Service Medal (New Zealand), and seal for Church of England bishops. He also accepted numerous private commissions. Among Thomas' later commissions were the Bromhead Memorial in Richmond Cemetery (1957) and several large bronzes destined for New Zealand, one of was received by King's College in Auckland; the other two were near-identical sculptures of Peter Pan. One was commissioned for the Dunedin Botanic Garden (unveiled in 1965), which inspired the commission for a second one to stand at Lake Virginia in Whanganui (unveiled in 1967).
Thomas moved into Kensington House, 108 Old Brompton Road in Kensington in 1919, initially renting the property and later buying it. He lived there and used the building as his studio until his death. Thomas died at home on 16 September 1976. His son gifted Kensington House (by then renamed Dora House) to the RBS to use as their headquarters and an exhibition space. His collection of proofs is now held by the British Museum.

Same as above coin, but looks like "Proof issue" from it's orange colour and attractive details.

Weight: 2.84g [2.83 g]. Mintage: 2,000.

KM#3 / Schön# 3 2 Cents. Year: 1955. Weight: 9.43g [9.45 g]. Metal: Bronze. Diameter: 30.50 mm. Thickness: 1.68 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.

Obverse: "BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES" written at the top section. Large Numeral "2" in the center with "CENT" written below it; flanked by palm tree fronds. Date "1955" written below the palm tree fronds. "·EASTERN GROUP·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: 5,500,000 + 2,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1955, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964 and 1965. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Cecil Walter Thomas (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#4 / Schön# 4 5 Cents. Year: 1955. Weight: 4.98g [5.00 g]. Metal: Nickel-Brass. Diameter: 20.25 mm. Thickness: 2.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center with Value "FIVE CENTS" written above it. Numeral "5" on left and right sides of the ship. Date "1955" written below the ship. "·EASTERN GROUP·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: 8,600,000 + 2,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1955, 1956, 1960, 1962, 1963, 1964 and 1965. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Cecil Walter Thomas (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#5 / Schön# 5 10 Cents. Year: 1955. Weight: 2.58g [2.60 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 17.50 mm. Thickness: 1.35 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center with Value "TEN CENTS" written above it. Numerals "10" on left and right sides of the ship. Date "1955" written below the ship. "·EASTERN GROUP·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: 5,000,000 + 2,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1955, 1956, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1964 and 1965. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Cecil Walter Thomas (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#6 / Schön# 6 25 Cents. Year: 1955. Weight: 6.48g [6.50 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 23.50 mm. Thickness: 1.90 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center with Value "TWENTY FIVE CENTS" written above it. Numerals "25" on left and right sides of the ship. Date "1955" written below the ship. "·EASTERN GROUP·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: 7,000,000 + 2,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1955, 1957, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964 and 1965. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Cecil Walter Thomas (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#7 / Schön# 7 50 Cents. Year: 1955. Weight: 12.94g [13.00 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 29.00 mm. Thickness: 2.36 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.

Obverse: "BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES" written in circular form almost around the edge. "EASTERN GROUP" written Coats of Arms of the British Caribbean Territories in the center. Value "FIFTY CENTS" divided between the lower part of the Coats of Arms. Date "1955"  divided between the lower part of the Coats of Arms.

Lower part of Coats of Arms details:

  • Shield of British Leeward Islands on the left.
  • Top circle badge of Trinidad before the independence - boat entering harbour with motto in three lines: "MISCERIQUE PROBAT POPULOS ET FOEDERA JUNGI" (He approves of the mingling of the peoples and their bonds of union).
  • Bottom circle badge of British Guyana - ship with motto in circular form: "DAMUS PETIMUSQUE VICISSIM" (We give and expect a fair return).
  • Shield of British Windward Islands on the right side.

Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: 1,500,000 + 2,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1955 and 1965. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Cecil Walter Thomas (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

 
1956
 

Same as above KM#4 Five Cents, but...

Year: 1956. Weight: 4.98 g [5.00g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 2,000,000 + N/A Proofs.

Same as above KM#5 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 1956. Weight: 2.58 g [2.60g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 4,000,000 + N/A Proofs.

 
1958
 

Same as above KM#3 Two Cents, but...

Year: 1958. Weight: 9.61 g [9.45g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 1,250,000 + N/A Proofs.

 
1959
 

Same as above KM#5 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 1959. Weight: 2.67 g [2.60g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 2,000,000 + N/A Proofs.

Same as above KM#6 Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 1959. Weight: 6.49 g [6.50g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 1,000,000 + N/A Proofs.

 
1960
 

KM#2 / Schön# 2 Cent. Year: 1960. Weight: 5.73g [5.67 g]. Metal: Bronze. Diameter: 25.00 mm. Thickness: 1.51 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES" written at the top section. Large Numeral "1" in the center with "CENT" written below it; flanked by palm tree fronds. Date "1960" written below the palm tree fronds. "·EASTERN GROUP·" written at the bottom section. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: 2,500,000 + N/A Proofs. Minted Years: 1955, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964 and 1965. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Cecil Walter Thomas (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).
 
1962
 

Same as above KM#6 Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 1962. Weight: 6.52 g [6.50g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 480,000 + N/A Proofs.

 
1964
 

Same as above KM#6 Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 1964. Weight: 6.36 g [6.50g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 480,000 + N/A Proofs.

 
1965
 

Same as above KM#3 Two Cents, but...

Year: 1965. Weight: 9.45 g [9.45g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 2,001,000 + N/A Proof like + N/A Proofs.

Same as above KM#4 Five Cents, but...

Year: 1965. Weight: 5.00 g [5.00g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 2,400,000 + N/A Proof like + N/A Proofs.

Same as above KM#5 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 1965. Weight: 2.64 g [2.60g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 3,200,000 + N/A Proof like + N/A Proofs.

Same as above KM#6 Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 1965. Weight: 6.40 g [6.50g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: 1,280,000 + N/A Proof like + N/A Proofs.

 
 
East Caribbean Territories (1980-1981)
 
Currency: Eastern Caribbean Dollar = 100 cents [1965-date].
Two large designs of non-circulating commemorative 10 Dollars were produced in 1980 and 1981.
  • KM#8 10 Dollars 1980. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Weight: 28.28 g. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Subject: 10th Anniversary of Caribbean Development Bank. Mintage: N/A.
  • KM#8a 10 Dollars 1980. Metal: 0.925 Silver. Weight: 28.28 g. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Subject: 10th Anniversary of Caribbean Development Bank. Mintage: 10,000.
  • KM#9 10 Dollars 1981. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Weight: 28.28 g. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Subject: Royal Wedding. Mintage: 50,000.
  • KM#9a 10 Dollars 1981. Metal: 0.925 Silver. Weight: 28.28 g. Diameter: 38.61 mm. Subject: Royal Wedding. Mintage: 30,000.
 
 
East Caribbean States (1981-date)
 
Currency: Eastern Caribbean Dollar = 100 cents [1965-date].
East Caribbean Dollar has been pegged to the United States dollar since 07 July 1976, at the exchange rate of US$ 1 = EC$ 2.70.
Between 1965 and 1983, the Eastern Caribbean Currency Authority issued the EC$, with banknotes from 1965 and coins from 1981. The EC$ is now issued by the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank, based in the city of Basseterre, in Saint Kitts and Nevis. The bank was established by an agreement (the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank Agreement) signed at Port of Spain on 05 July 1983. The exchange rate of $4.80 = £1 sterling (equivalent to the old $1 = 4s 2d) continued until 1976 for the new Eastern Caribbean dollar.
Until 1981, the coins of the BWI$ circulated. In 1981, a new series of coins was introduced in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 25 cents and 1 dollar. The 1- and 5-cent coins were scalloped in shape while the 2-cent coin was square. These three were struck in aluminum. The 10- and 25-cent coins were round and cupro-nickel. The dollar was aluminum bronze and also round. The round, aluminum bronze dollar coin was replaced in 1989 with a decagonal, cupro-nickel type. In 2002 new and larger round-shaped 1, 2, and 5 cent pieces were introduced, along with a new 1 dollar coin which was also round. The effigy of Queen Elizabeth II was also changed that same year on all coin denominations to the Ian Rank-Broadley design, making it the last commonwealth currency up to that date to discontinue the Arnold Machin portrait. Their compositions remained aluminum and cupro-nickel, respectively. Higher denominations exist, but these were issued only as medal-coins. 1 cent and 2 cents coins were withdrawn from circulation in July 2015, but will remain legal tender until 30 June 2020.
 
1981
 

KM#10 / Schön# 10 Cent. Year: 1981. Weight: 0.80g [0.80 g]. Metal: Aluminium. Diameter: 18.00 mm; 8-sided. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 1981" written at the top section. Numeral "1" flanked by palm tree fronds. Value "ONE CENT" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in the top section around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A + 5,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1981, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000 and 2001. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

Arnold Machin O.B.E., R.A. (30 September 1911 – 09 March 1999) was a British artist, sculptor, and coin and postage stamp designer.
In 1964 Machin was chosen to design a new effigy of the Queen for the decimal coinage, which was to be introduced from 1968. This was used for all British coins until 1984 and was also used on the coins of Rhodesia in 1964, coins of Canada from 1965 to 1989, Australia from 1966 to 1984 and New Zealand from 1967 to 1985.
In 1966 the Queen approved Machin's similar design for an effigy of her to be used on what came to be known as the "Machin series" of British definitive postage stamps. Machin produced a bas-relief in clay which, when combined with a different coloured background, is reminiscent of the overlaid decoration of potteries such as Wedgwood. The design was first used on the 4d stamp which was issued in June 1967, and has been used on all British definitive stamps (except more recent regional issues) since. It is thought that this design is one of the most reproduced works of art in history with, to date, approximately 320 billion copies produced.
On several occasions the Queen has been approached with suggestions for the replacement of the Machin stamp portrait. Although she has considered alternatives, she has never approved any new design, stipulating that any such replacement would have to be "a work of real quality".
In 2007 the Machin-designed stamp was still in use at its 40th anniversary and to mark the occasion, the Post Office issued a commemorative stamp featuring a photograph of Machin. It was also available for sale in a miniature sheet which incorporated another stamp with a reproduction of a Machin series stamp, as well as two £1 Machins in different colours.
Machin and his wife had a son, Francis (1949–2007), who was also an artist, and an architect. After Francis died, some of his father's possessions, from his house near Eccleshall in rural Staffordshire, were sold at auction. These included the fourth of the known final plasters made to create the Machin stamp series, the three others being kept in the Royal Mail archives.
A Minor planet "3109 Machin" is named in his honour, which was discovered by Luboš Kohoutek (a Czech astronomer and a discoverer of minor planets and comets) from Hamburg-Bergedorf Observatory on 19 February 1974.

KM#11 / Schön# 11 2 Cents. Year: 1981. Weight: 0.99g [1.00 g]. Metal: Aluminium. Diameter: 18.00 mm x 18.00 mm; Square. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 1981" written at the top section. Numeral "2" flanked by palm tree fronds. Value "TWO CENTS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in the top section around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A + 5,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1981, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#12 / Schön# 12 5 Cents. Year: 1981. Weight: 1.29g [1.31 g]. Metal: Aluminium. Diameter: 23.00 mm; 8-sided. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 1981" written at the top section. Numeral "5" flanked by palm tree fronds. Value "FIVE CENTS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in the top section around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A + 5,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1981, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#13 / Schön# 13 10 Cents. Year: 1981. Weight: 2.61g [2.59 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 17.50 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.

Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 1981" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center. Numerals "10" on left and right sides of the ship. Value "TEN CENTS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in the top section around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A + 5,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1981, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

Golden Hind was an English galleon best known for her privateering circumnavigation of the globe between 1577 and 1580, captained by Sir Francis Drake. She was originally known as Pelican, but was renamed by Drake mid-voyage in 1578, in honour of his patron, Sir Christopher Hatton, whose crest was a golden 'hind' (a female red deer). Hatton was one of the principal sponsors of Drake's world voyage. A full-sized, still sailable reconstruction exists in London, on the south bank of the Thames. Fate: Golden Hind was disintegrated and broken up in late 1600s; two replicas exist.

Sir Francis Drake (b. c.1540 – d. 28 January 1596) was an English sea captain, privateer, slave trader, pirate, naval officer and explorer of the Elizabethan era. Drake carried out the second circumnavigation of the world in a single expedition, from 1577 to 1580, and was the first to complete the voyage as captain while leading the expedition throughout the entire circumnavigation. With his incursion into the Pacific Ocean, he claimed what is now California for the English and inaugurated an era of conflict with the Spanish on the western coast of the Americas, an area that had previously been largely unexplored by western shipping. Queen Elizabeth I awarded Drake a knighthood on 04 April 1581, which he received on the Golden Hind in Deptford. In the same year he was appointed mayor of Plymouth. As a Vice Admiral, he was second-in-command of the English fleet in the victorious battle against the Spanish Armada in 1588. He died of dysentery in January 1596, after unsuccessfully attacking San Juan, Puerto Rico. Drake's exploits made him a hero to the English, but his privateering led the Spanish to brand him a pirate, known to them as El Draque. King Philip II allegedly offered a reward for his capture or death of 20,000 ducats, about £6 million (US$8 million) in modern currency.
On 26 September 1580, Golden Hind sailed into Plymouth with Drake and 59 remaining crew aboard, along with a rich cargo of spices and captured Spanish treasures. The Queen's half-share of the cargo surpassed the rest of the crown's income for that entire year. Drake was hailed as the first Englishman to circumnavigate the Earth (and the second such voyage arriving with at least one ship intact, after Elcano's in 1520).
After returning from his voyage of circumnavigation, Drake became the Mayor of Plymouth, in September 1581. He became a member of parliament during a session of the 4th Parliament of Elizabeth I, on 16 January 1581, for the constituency of Camelford. He did not actively participate at this point, and on 17 February 1581 he was granted leave of absence "for certain his necessary business in the service of her Majesty".
Drake became a member of parliament again in 1584 for Bossiney on the forming of the 5th Parliament of Elizabeth I. He served the duration of the parliament and was active in issues regarding the navy, fishing, early American colonisation, and issues related chiefly to Devon. He spent the time covered by the next two parliamentary terms engaged in other duties and an expedition to Portugal. He became a member of parliament for Plymouth in 1593. He was active in issues of interest to Plymouth as a whole, but also to emphasise defence against the Spanish.
Drake's seafaring career continued into his mid-fifties. In 1595, he failed to conquer the port of Las Palmas, and following a disastrous campaign against Spanish America, where he suffered a number of defeats, he unsuccessfully attacked San Juan de Puerto Rico, eventually losing the Battle of San Juan. The Spanish gunners from El Morro Castle shot a cannonball through the cabin of Drake's flagship, but he survived. He attempted to attack over land in an effort to capture the rich port of Panamá but was defeated again. A few weeks later, in January 1596, he died (aged about 56) of dysentery, a common disease in the tropics at the time, while anchored off the coast of Portobelo where some Spanish treasure ships had sought shelter. Following his death, the English fleet withdrew.
Before dying, he asked to be dressed in his full armour. He was buried at sea in a sealed lead-lined coffin, near Portobelo, a few miles off the coastline. It is supposed that his final resting place is near the wrecks of two British ships, the Elizabeth and the Delight, scuttled in Portobelo Bay. Divers continue to search for the coffin. Drake's body has never been recovered.

KM#14 / Schön# 14 25 Cents. Year: 1981. Weight: 6.39g [6.48 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 23.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 1981" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center. Numerals "25" on left and right sides of the ship. Value "TWENTY FIVE CENTS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in the top section around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A + 5,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1981, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#15 / Schön# 15 One Dollar. Year: 1981. Weight: 7.84g [8.00 g]. Metal: Aluminium-Bronze. Diameter: 26.50 mm. Thickness: 2.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.

Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 1981" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center. Numeral "1" on left and right sides of the ship. Value "ONE DOLLAR" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in the top section around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A + 5,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 1981 and 1986. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#16 / Schön# 17 10 Dollars. Year: 1981. Weight: 28.38g [28.00 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 40.00 mm. Thickness: 3.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.

Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES" written at the top section. Numerals "10" with "DOLLARS" written below it; flanked by palm tree fronds. Date "1981" written at the bottom. Reverse: FAO - World Food Day logo in the center. Mintage: 12,000 (estimated). Minted Years: One year type. Subject: FAO (Food & Agriculture Organisation) -  World Food Day on 16 October 1981. This is non-circulating commemorative coin.

Note: KM#16a were produced in 0.925 silver with same specifications. Mintage: 5,000 (estimated).

 
1984
 

Same as above KM#12 Five Cents, but...

Year: 1984. Weight: 1.33 g [1.31g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
1986
 

Same as above KM#13 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 1986. Weight: 2.59 g [2.59g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
1987
 

Same as above KM#10 One Cent, but...

Year: 1987. Weight: 0.81 g [0.80g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#13 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 1987. Weight: 2.54 g [2.59g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
1989
 

Same as above KM#10 One Cent, but...

Year: 1989. Weight: 0.81 g [0.80g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#13 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 1989. Weight: 2.52 g [2.59g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#14 Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 1989. Weight: 6.49 g [6.48g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

KM#20 / Schön# 16 One Dollar. Year: 1989. Weight: 8.05g [8.00 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 27.00 mm; Decagonal (10-sided). Thickness: 1.70 mm. Edge: Reeded / Plain; 5 patches each (19 dents in each Reeded patch). Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.

Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 1989" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center. Numeral "1" on left and right sides of the ship. Value "ONE DOLLAR" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in the top section around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Arnold Machin (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

 
1991
 

Same as above KM#11 Two Cents, but...

Year: 1991. Weight: 1.01 g [1.00g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#12 Five Cents, but...

Year: 1991. Weight: 1.32 g [1.31g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#20 One Dollar, but...

Year: 1991. Weight: 8.00 g [8.00g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
1992
 

Same as above KM#10 One Cent, but...

Year: 1992. Weight: 0.81 g [0.80g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
1993
 

Same as above KM#10 One Cent, but...

Year: 1993. Weight: 0.82 g [0.80g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
1994
 

Same as above KM#10 One Cent, but...

Year: 1994. Weight: 0.81 g [0.80g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#12 Five Cents, but...

Year: 1994. Weight: 1.31 g [1.31g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#13 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 1994. Weight: 2.59 g [2.59g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
1995
 

Same as above KM#12 Five Cents, but...

Year: 1995. Weight: 1.30 g [1.31g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#13 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 1995. Weight: 2.62 g [2.59g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
1997
 

Same as above KM#10 One Cent, but...

Year: 1997. Weight: 0.83 g [0.80g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#11 Two Cents, but...

Year: 1997. Weight: 1.03 g [1.00g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#12 Five Cents, but...

Year: 1997. Weight: 1.33 g [1.31g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#13 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 1997. Weight: 2.55 g [2.59g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#14 Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 1997. Weight: 6.41 g [6.48g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#20 One Dollar, but...

Year: 1997. Weight: 8.00 g [8.00g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
1998
 

Same as above KM#12 Five Cents, but...

Year: 1998. Weight: 1.36 g [1.31g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
1999
 

Same as above KM#13 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 1999. Weight: 2.60 g [2.59g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#14 Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 1999. Weight: 6.55 g [6.48g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
2000
 

Same as above KM#10 One Cent, but...

Year: 2000. Weight: 0.80 g [0.80g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#12 Five Cents, but...

Year: 2000. Weight: 1.34 g [1.31g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#13 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 2000. Weight: 2.62 g [2.59g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#14 Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 2000. Weight: 6.46 g [6.48g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
2002
 

KM#34 / Schön# 35 Cent. Year: 2002. Weight: 1.03g [1.03 g]. Metal: Aluminium. Diameter: 18.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.

Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 2002" written at the top section. Numeral "1" flanked by palm tree fronds. Value "ONE CENT" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2002, 2004, 2008, 2011 and 2013. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#35 / Schön# 36 2 Cents. Year: 2002. Weight: 1.45g [1.42 g]. Metal: Aluminium. Diameter: 21.50 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 2002" written at the top section. Numeral "2" flanked by palm tree fronds. Value "TWO CENTS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2002, 2004, 2008 and 2011. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#36 / Schön# 37 5 Cents. Year: 2002. Weight: 1.81g [1.75 g]. Metal: Aluminium. Diameter: 23.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 2002" written at the top section. Numeral "5" flanked by palm tree fronds. Value "FIVE CENTS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2002, 2004, 2008, 2010, 2015 and 2019. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#37 / Schön# 36 10 Cents. Year: 2002. Weight: 2.58g [2.59 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 17.50 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 2002" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center. Numerals "10" on left and right sides of the ship. Value "TEN CENTS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2002, 2004 and 2007. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#38 / Schön# 39 25 Cents. Year: 2002. Weight: 6.45g [6.48 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 23.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.
Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 2002" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center. Numerals "25" on left and right sides of the ship. Value "TWENTY FIVE CENTS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A + 5,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 2002, 2004 and 2007. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

KM#39 / Schön# 40 One Dollar. Year: 2002. Weight: 7.95g [7.98 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Diameter: 26.00 mm. Thickness: 1.92 mm. Edge: Reeded / Plain; 4 patches each. Alignment: Medal. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK.

Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 2002" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center. Numeral "1" on left and right sides of the ship. Value "ONE DOLLAR" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2002, 2004 and 2007. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

 
2004
 

Same as above KM#34 One Cent, but...

Year: 2004. Weight: 1.02 g [1.03g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#35 Two Cents, but...

Year: 2004. Weight: 1.42 g [1.42g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#36 Five Cents, but...

Year: 2004. Weight: 1.76 g [1.75g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#37 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 2004. Weight: 2.60 g [2.59g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#38 Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 2004. Weight: 6.51 g [6.48g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#39 One Dollar, but...

Year: 2004. Weight: 7.96 g [7.98g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
2007
 

Same as above KM#37 Ten Cents, but...

Year: 2007. Weight: 2.55 g [2.59g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#38 Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 2007. Weight: 6.39 g [6.48g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

 
2008
 

Same as above KM#34 One Cent, but...

Year: 2008. Weight: 1.02 g [1.03g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#35 Two Cents, but...

Year: 2008. Weight: 1.42 g [1.42g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

Same as above KM#36 Five Cents, but...

Year: 2008. Weight: 1.76 g [1.75g]. Mint: British Royal Mint, UK. Mintage: N/A.

KM#58 / Schön# 85 One Dollars. Year: ND (2008). Weight: 11.17g [11.15 g]. Metal: Nickel plated steel (magnetic). Diameter: 29.50 mm. Thickness: 2.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada.

Obverse: "EASTERN CARIBBEAN CENTRAL BANK" written at the top section, outside the center circle. "TOGETHER WE STAND" written within wreath in the center circle. "ONE DOLLAR" and "1983-2008" written in two lines below the wreath, within the center circle.. Mintage: 500,000 (estimated). Minted Years: One year type. Engraver: Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side). Subject: 25th Anniversary of the Central Bank 1983-2008. Issued Date: 29 January 2009. Circulating commemorative coin.

 
2009
Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada replaces British Royal Mint, UK. and start producing coins from 2009 onwards.
 

KM#37a / Schön# 36a 10 Cents. Year: 2009. Weight: 2.33g [2.30 g]. Metal: Nickel plated Steel (magnetic). Diameter: 17.50 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada.
Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 2002" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center. Numerals "10" on left and right sides of the ship. Value "TEN CENTS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2009, 2014 and 2018. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).
 
2010
 

Same as above KM#36 Five Cents, but...

Year: 2010. Weight: 1.75 g [1.75g]. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada. Mintage: N/A.

Note: Larger legend and spacing on Obverse side.

KM#38a / Schön# 39a 25 Cents. Year: 2010. Weight: 6.39g [6.48 g]. Metal: Nickel plated Steel (magnetic). Diameter: 23.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada.
Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 2002" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center. Numerals "25" on left and right sides of the ship. Value "TWENTY FIVE CENTS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A + 5,000 Proofs. Minted Years: 2010, 2016 and 2017. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).
 
2011
 

Same as above KM#34 One Cent, but...

Year: 2011. Weight: 1.04 g [1.03g]. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada. Mintage: N/A.

Note: 2011 issue shows slightly smaller lettering with distinctively smaller and thick numeral "1" in the center on Obverse side.

Same as above KM#35 Two Cents, but...

Year: 2011. Weight: 1.42 g [1.42g]. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada. Mintage: N/A.

Note: 2011 issue has smaller but broader Numeral "2" in the center on Obverse side.

KM#87 / Schön# 86 Two Dollars. Year: 2011. Weight: 11.46g [11.35 g]. Metal: Nickel plated steel (magnetic). Diameter: 30.00 mm. Thickness: 2.00 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada.

Obverse: "EASTERN CARIBBEAN STATES 2011" written at the top section. Small Plant with 11 braches and 33 leaves with visible roots in the soil in the center. "GROW YOUR SAVINGS" written above the plant. Numeral "2" on lower left and lower right sides of the plant. Value "TWO DOLLARS" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written in the bottom section around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: 2,000,000 (estimated). Minted Years: One year type. Engraver: Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side). Subject: 10th Anniversary of Financial Information Month. Issued Date: 17 October 2011. Circulating commemorative coin.

 
2012
 

KM#39a / Schön# 40a One Dollar. Year: 2012. Weight: 8.07g [7.98 g]. Metal: Nickel plated steel (magnetic). Diameter: 26.00 mm. Thickness: 1.92 mm. Edge: Reeded / Plain; 4 patches each. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada.

Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES 2012" written at the top section. The "Golden Hind" (1577-1600s), ship of Sir Francis Drake (1542-1596) in the sea in the center. Numeral "1" on left and right sides of the ship. Value "ONE DOLLAR" written at the bottom. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: N/A. Minted Years: 2012, 2015, 2017 and 2019. Engraver: Thomas Humphrey Paget (Value side) and Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side).

 
2013
 

Same as above KM#34 One Cent, but...

Year: 2013. Weight: 1.05 g [1.03g]. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada. Mintage: N/A.

Note: Distinctively smaller and thick numeral "1" in the center on Obverse side.

 
2014
 

Same as above KM#37a Ten Cents, but...

Year: 2014. Weight: 2.32 g [2.30g]. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada. Mintage: N/A.

 
2015
 

Same as above KM#36 Five Cents, but...

Year: 2015. Weight: 1.78 g [1.75g]. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada. Mintage: N/A.

Note: Larger legend and spacing on Obverse side.

Same as above KM#39a One Dollar, but...

Year: 2015. Weight: 7.95 g [7.98g]. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada. Mintage: N/A.

One Dollar. Year: ND (2015). Weight: 7.97g [7.98 g]. Metal: Nickel plated steel (magnetic). Diameter: 26.00 mm. Thickness: 1.92 mm. Edge: Reeded / Plain; 4 patches each. Alignment: Medal. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada.

Obverse: "EAST CARIBBEAN STATES" written at the top with Value "ONE DOLLAR" written below it. Numeral "1" in Red colour above two coloured fish (Red and Aqua) in the Aqua coloured water, in the center. "$1" written at the left side. "LEWARD ISLANDS" and "WINDWARD ISLANDS" written clockwise in two lines at the left side of Aqua water. Queen Elizabeth II facing 3/4 left at the bottom right side. Dates "1965-2015" written below the colour Aqua water. Reverse: Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II facing right in the center. "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" written around Queen Elizabeth II's portrait. Mintage: 1,000,000. Minted Years: One year type. Engraver: Ian Rank-Broadley (Queen Elizabeth II's portrait side). Subject: 50th Anniversary of Eastern Caribbean Currency 1965-2015. Circulating commemorative coin.

Note: Wrong spelling "LEWARD ISLANDS" instead of "LEEWARD ISLANDS" on the coin.

Leeward Islands consists of four islands using East Caribbean Dollar: Anguilla (UK) + Antigua and Barbuda + Montserrat (UK) + Saint Kitts and Nevis (except the Virgin Islands). Windward Islands also consists of four islands using this currency: Dominica + Saint Lucia + Saint Vincent and the Grenadines + Grenada.

 
2016
 

Same as above KM#38a Twenty Five Cents, but...

Year: 2016. Weight: 6.51 g [6.48g]. Mint: Royal Canadian Mint, Ottawa, Canada. Mintage: N/A.

 
 
 
 
 
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