USA Coinage: 1964 - 1968
under President: Lyndon Baines Johnson
 
Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th President of the United States from 1963 to 1969, assuming the office after serving as the 37th Vice President of the United States from 1961 to 1963. A Democrat from Texas, he also served as a United States Representative and as the Majority Leader in the United States Senate. Johnson is one of only four people who have served in all four federal elected positions.
Born in a farmhouse in Stonewall, Texas, Johnson was a high school teacher and worked as a Congressional aide before winning election to the House of Representatives in 1937. He won election to the Senate in 1948, and was appointed the position of Senate Majority Whip in 1951. He became the Senate Minority Leader in 1953 and the Senate Majority Leader in 1955. As a leader in the Senate, Johnson became known for his domineering personality and the "Johnson treatment", his aggressive coercion of powerful politicians to advance legislation. Johnson ran for the Democratic nomination in the 1960 presidential election. Although unsuccessful, he accepted the invitation of then-Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts to be his running mate. They went on to win a close election over the Republican ticket of Richard Nixon and Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., and Johnson was sworn in as Vice President on January 20, 1961. On November 22, 1963, Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, and Johnson succeeded Kennedy as president. The following year, Johnson won a landslide in 1964, defeating Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona.
Johnson was quickly sworn in as President on Air Force One in Dallas on November 22, 1963, just 2 hours and 8 minutes after John F. Kennedy was assassinated, amid suspicions of a conspiracy against the government. He was sworn in by U.S. District Judge Sarah T. Hughes, a family friend. In the rush, a Bible was not at hand, so Johnson took the oath of office using a Roman Catholic missal from President Kennedy's desk. Cecil Stoughton's iconic photograph of Johnson taking the presidential oath of office as Mrs. Kennedy looks on is the most famous photo ever taken aboard a presidential aircraft.
On November 29, 1963 just one week after Kennedy's assassination, Johnson issued an executive order to rename NASA's Apollo Launch Operations Center and the NASA/Air Force Cape Canaveral launch facilities as the John F. Kennedy Space Center. Cape Canaveral was officially known as Cape Kennedy from 1963-1973.
The United States presidential election of 1964 was the 45th quadrennial presidential election. It was held on Tuesday, November 03, 1964. Democratic candidate and incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson had come to office less than a year earlier following the assassination of his predecessor John F. Kennedy. Johnson, who had successfully associated himself with Kennedy’s popularity, won 61.1% of the popular vote, the highest win by a candidate since James Monroe’s re-election in 1820. It was the most lopsided US presidential election in terms of popular votes, and the tenth-most lopsided presidential election in the history of the United States in terms of electoral votes. No candidate for president since has equalled or surpassed Johnson’s percentage of the popular vote, and since 1820, only Abraham Lincoln in 1864, Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1936, Richard Nixon in 1972 and Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984 have won by a greater electoral vote margin. The Republican candidate, Senator Barry Morris Goldwater of Arizona, suffered from a lack of support from his own party and his deeply unpopular political positions. Johnson’s campaign advocated a series of anti-poverty programs collectively known as the Great Society, and successfully portrayed Goldwater as being a dangerous extremist. Johnson easily won the Presidency, carrying 44 of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (Electoral vote: 486), which voted for the first time in this election. Goldwater carried the remaining six states (Electoral vote: 52) in what would be the first election to see a total of fifty states carried by presidential candidates. Goldwater won only his native state of Arizona and five Deep South states: Louisiana, Mississippi, Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina; which had been increasingly alienated by Democratic civil rights policies. This was the best showing in the South for a GOP candidate since Reconstruction.
President Lyndon B. Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., and Rosa Parks at the signing of the Voting Rights Act on August 06, 1965. President Johnson signs the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 in front of Sen. Edward Kennedy and Sen. Robert Kennedy.
During Johnson's administration, NASA conducted the Gemini manned space program, developed the Saturn V rocket and its launch facility, and prepared to make the first manned Apollo program flights. On January 27, 1967, the nation was stunned when the entire crew of Apollo 1 was killed in a cabin fire during a spacecraft test on the launch pad, stopping Apollo in its tracks. Rather than appointing another Warren-style commission, Johnson accepted Administrator James E. Webb's request for NASA to do its own investigation, holding itself accountable to Congress and the President. Johnson maintained his staunch support of Apollo through Congressional and press controversy, and the program recovered. The first two manned missions, Apollo 7 and the first manned flight to the Moon, Apollo 8, were completed by the end of Johnson's term. He congratulated the Apollo 8 crew, saying, "You've taken ... all of us, all over the world, into a new era." On July 16, 1969, Johnson attended the launch of the first Moon landing mission Apollo 11, becoming the first former or incumbent US president to witness a rocket launch.
At Kennedy's death, there were 16,000 American military personnel stationed in Vietnam; these personnel supported South Vietnam in the Vietnam War against North Vietnam. Vietnam had been partitioned at the 1954 Geneva Conference into two countries, with North Vietnam led by a Communist government. Johnson subscribed to the Domino Theory in Vietnam and to a containment policy that required America to make a serious effort to stop all Communist expansion. On taking office, Johnson immediately reversed Kennedy's order to withdraw 1,000 military personnel by the end of 1963. In late summer 1964, Johnson seriously questioned the value of staying in Vietnam but, after meeting with Secretary of State Dean Rusk and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Maxwell D. Taylor, declared his readiness "to do more when we had a base" or when Saigon was politically more stable. He expanded the numbers and roles of the American military following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident happened on August 02, 1964. In October 1967‍, ‌support for the Vietnam War was dropping and the anti-Vietnam War movement strengthened.
In a 1993 interview for the Johnson Presidential Library oral history archives, Johnson's Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara stated that a carrier battle group, the U.S. 6th Fleet, sent on a training exercise toward Gibraltar was re-positioned back towards the eastern Mediterranean to be able to assist Israel during the Six-Day War of June 1967. Given the rapid Israeli advances following their strike on Egypt, the administration "thought the situation was so tense in Israel that perhaps the Syrians, fearing Israel would attack them, or the Soviets supporting the Syrians might wish to redress the balance of power and might attack Israel". The Soviets learned of this course correction and regarded it as an offensive move. In a hotline message from Moscow, Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin said, "If you want war you're going to get war." The Soviet Union supported its Arab allies. In May 1967, the Soviets started a surge deployment of their naval forces into the East Mediterranean. Early in the crisis they began to shadow the US and British carriers with destroyers and intelligence collecting vessels. The Soviet naval squadron in the Mediterranean was sufficiently strong to act as a major restraint on the U.S. Navy. In a 1983 interview with The Boston Globe, McNamara claimed that "We damn near had war". He said Kosygin was angry that "we had turned around a carrier in the Mediterranean".
As he had served less than 24 months of President Kennedy's term, Johnson was constitutionally permitted to run for a second full term in the 1968 presidential election under the provisions of the 22nd Amendment. Initially, no prominent Democratic candidate was prepared to run against a sitting president of the Democratic Party. Only Senator Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota challenged Johnson as an anti-war candidate in the New Hampshire primary, hoping to pressure the Democrats to oppose the Vietnam War. On March 12, McCarthy won 42 percent of the primary vote to Johnson's 49 percent, an amazingly strong showing for such a challenger. Four days later, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy of New York entered the race. Internal polling by Johnson's campaign in Wisconsin, the next state to hold a primary election, showed the President trailing badly. Johnson did not leave the White House to campaign. By this time Johnson had lost control of the Democratic Party, which was splitting into four factions, each of which generally disliked the other three. The first consisted of Johnson (and Humphrey), labor unions, and local party bosses (led by Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley). The second group consisted of students and intellectuals who were vociferously against the war and rallied behind McCarthy. The third group were Catholics, Hispanics and African Americans, who rallied behind Robert Kennedy. The fourth group were traditionally segregationist white Southerners, who rallied behind George C. Wallace and the American Independent Party. Vietnam was one of many issues that splintered the party, and Johnson could see no way to win the war and no way to unite the party long enough for him to win re-election. After Robert Kennedy's assassination, Johnson rallied the party bosses and unions to give Humphrey the nomination at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. Personal correspondences between the President and some in the Republican Party suggested Johnson tacitly supported Nelson Rockefeller's campaign. He reportedly said that if Rockefeller became the Republican nominee, he would not campaign against him (and would not campaign for Humphrey). In what was termed the October surprise, Johnson announced to the nation on October 31, 1968, that he had ordered a complete cessation of "all air, naval and artillery bombardment of North Vietnam", effective November 01, should the Hanoi Government be willing to negotiate and citing progress with the Paris peace talks. In the end, Democrats did not fully unite behind Humphrey, enabling Republican candidate Richard Nixon to win the election.
In 1968, the number was agreed upon. AT&T chose the number 9-1-1, which was simple, easy to remember, dialed easily, and worked well with the phone systems in place at the time. It became the national emergency number for the United States. Calling this single number provided a caller access to police, fire, and ambulance services, through what would become known as a common public-safety answering point (PSAP). The number itself, however, did not become widely known until the 1970s, and many municipalities did not have 9-1-1 service until well into the 1980s.
On Inauguration Day (January 20, 1969), Johnson saw Nixon sworn in, then got on the plane to fly back to Texas. When the front door of the plane closed, Johnson pulled out a cigarette—his first cigarette he had smoked since his heart attack in 1955. One of his daughters pulled it out of his mouth and said, "Daddy, what are you doing? You're going to kill yourself." He took it back and said, "I've now raised you girls. I've now been President. Now it's my time!" From that point on, he went into a very self-destructive spiral. — Historian Michael Beschloss.
With Johnson's heart condition now diagnosed as terminal, he returned home to his ranch outside San Antonio. At approximately 3:39 pm Central Time on January 22, 1973, Johnson suffered a massive heart attack. After he had placed a call to the Secret Service agents on the ranch, they rushed to the former President's bedroom. There, they found Johnson still holding the telephone receiver in his hand, unconscious and not breathing. Johnson was airlifted in one of his own airplanes to San Antonio and taken to Brooke Army General, where he was pronounced dead on arrival at the facility by cardiologist and Army colonel Dr. George McGranahan. He was 64 years old. Shortly after Johnson's death, his press secretary Tom Johnson (no relation) telephoned Walter Cronkite at CBS; Cronkite was live on the air with the CBS Evening News at the time, and a report on Vietnam was cut abruptly while Cronkite was still on the line, so he could break the news. Johnson's death came two days after Richard Nixon's second inauguration, which followed Nixon's landslide victory in the 1972 election. His death meant that for the first time since 1933, when Calvin Coolidge died during Herbert Hoover's final months in office, that there were no former Presidents still living; Johnson had been the only living ex-President since December 26, 1972, following the death of Harry S. Truman.
Johnson was honored with a state funeral in which Texas Congressman J. J. Pickle and former Secretary of State Dean Rusk eulogized him at the Capitol. The final services took place on January 25. The funeral was held at the National City Christian Church in Washington, D.C., where he had often worshiped as president. The service was presided over by President Richard Nixon and attended by foreign dignitaries, led by former Japanese prime minister Eisaku Satō, who served as Japanese prime minister during Johnson's presidency. Eulogies were given by the Rev. Dr. George Davis, the church's pastor, and W. Marvin Watson, former postmaster general. Nixon did not speak, though he attended, as is customary for presidents during state funerals, but the eulogists turned to him and lauded him for his tributes, as Rusk did the day before, as Nixon mentioned Johnson's death in a speech he gave the day after Johnson died, announcing the peace agreement to end the Vietnam War.
 
 
Currency: Dollar = 100 cents
Monetary System: Penny = Cent, Trime = 3 Cents, Nickel = 5 Cents, Dime = 10 Cents, Quarter = 25 Cents, Half Dollar = 50, Cents, Dollar = 100 Cents, Quarter Eagle = $2.50 Gold, Stella = $4.00 Gold, Half Eagle = $5.00 Gold, Eagle = $10.00 Gold and Double Eagle = $20.00 Gold.
Mint Marks:
C – Charlotte, N.C., 1838-1861.
CC – Carson City, NV, 1870-1893.
D – Dahlonega, GA, 1838-1861.
D – Denver, CO, 1906-present.
O – New Orleans, LA, 1838-1909.
P – Philadelphia, PA, 1793-present (coins without mintmark also belongs to Philadelphia).
S – San Francisco, CA, 1854-present.
W – West Point, NY, 1984-present.

 

1964
 

KM#201 1 cent. Year: 1964. Weight: 3.12 g [3.11 g]. Metal: Bronze (95% Cu and 5% Zn or Tin). Diameter: 19.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Philadelphia, USA. Obverse: "IN GOD WE TRUST" motto at the top. Right facing profile of President Abraham Lincoln. "LIBERTY" written at the left side horizontally. Date at the chest of Abraham Lincoln. "V.D.B" written at 7 o'clock near the edge.
Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. "E·PLURIBUS·UNUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written above Lincoln Memorial building. Lincoln Memorial building in the center. "ONE CENT" written at the bottom. Mintage: 2,648,575,000 + 3,950,762 Proof. Mintage Years: [see under 1959]. Engraver: Victor David Brenner (Lincoln portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).

KM#201 1 cent. Year: 1964D. Weight: 3.13 g [3.11 g]. Metal: Bronze (95% Cu and 5% Zn or Tin). Diameter: 19.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Denver, USA. Obverse: "IN GOD WE TRUST" motto at the top. Right facing profile of President Abraham Lincoln. "LIBERTY" written at the left side horizontally. Date at the chest of Abraham Lincoln. "V.D.B" written at 7 o'clock near the edge. "D" written below Date.
Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. "E·PLURIBUS·UNUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written above Lincoln Memorial building. Lincoln Memorial building in the center. "ONE CENT" written at the bottom. Mintage: 3,799,071,500. Mintage Years: [see under 1959]. Engraver: Victor David Brenner (Lincoln portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).

KM#195 Dime (10 cents). Year: 1964. Weight: 2.50 g [2.50 g]. Metal: 0.900 Silver. Diameter: 17.90 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Philadelphia, USA. Obverse: "LIBERTY" is written at the top left clockwise. The portrait of Franklin D. Roosevel (32nd President of the United States from 1933 to his death in 1945) facing left in the center. Motto: "IN GOD WE TRUST" is at bottom left side. Date at the bottom right side. No mint mark belongs to Philadelphia, USA.
Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. An olive branch, a torch and an oak branch in the center, symbolize respectively peace, liberty and victory. Motto "E • PLU RIB US • U NUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written between the stems and base of the torch. Value "• ONE DIME •" written at the bottom section. Mintage: 929,360,000 + 3,950,762 Proof. Mintage Years: [see under 1946]. Engraver: John Ray Sinnock (both sides). This coin is commonly known by coin collectors as "Roosevelt Silver Dime". Mintmark "D" or "S" is at the lower left side of the torch (below B of PLURIBUS and above E of ONE).

KM#195 Dime (10 cents). Year: 1964D. Weight: 2.51 g [2.50 g]. Metal: 0.900 Silver. Diameter: 17.90 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Denver, USA. Obverse: "LIBERTY" is written at the top left clockwise. The portrait of Franklin D. Roosevel (32nd President of the United States from 1933 to his death in 1945) facing left in the center. Motto: "IN GOD WE TRUST" is at bottom left side. Date at the bottom right side.
Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. An olive branch, a torch and an oak branch in the center, symbolize respectively peace, liberty and victory. Motto "E • PLU RIB US • U NUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written between the stems and base of the torch. Value "• ONE DIME •" written at the bottom section. Mintage: 1,357,517,180. Mintage Years: [see under 1946]. Engraver: John Ray Sinnock (both sides). This coin is commonly known by coin collectors as "Roosevelt Silver Dime". Mintmark "D" or "S" is at the lower left side of the torch (below B of PLURIBUS and above E of ONE).

KM#164 Quarter Dollar (25 cents). Year: 1964. Weight: 6.18 g [6.25 g]. Metal: 0.900 Silver. Diameter: 24.30 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Philadelphia, USA. Obverse: "LIBERTY" written at the top. George Washington's head facing left in the center. Motto: "IN GOD WE TRUST" written in two lines at bottom left side. Date at the bottom. No Mintmark written above ER in QUARTER.
Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top. An eagle, looking left, wings spread, and standing on a shaft of arrows with two olive sprays beneath it in the center. "E PLURIBUS UNUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written above the Eagle's head in two lines. "QUARTER DOLLAR" written at the bottom. Mintage: 564,341,347 (including Type B Proof reverse die). Mintage Years: [see under 1941]. Engraver: John Flanagan (both sides). This coin is commonly known by coin collectors as "Washington Silver Quarter". Mintmark "D" or "S" is written above ER in QUARTER.

KM#202 Half Dollar (50 cents). Year: 1964. Weight: 12.59 g [12.50 g]. Metal: 0.900 Silver. Diameter: 30.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Philadelphia, USA. Obverse: "LIBERTY" written at the section. President John Fitzgerald Kennedy facing right in the center. Motto: "IN GOD WE TRUST" written besides his neck. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. State emblem (eagle with shield with "E PLURIBUS UNUM" on the banner) with ring of 50 stars in the center. One Dot on each side. Value "HALF DOLLAR" written at the bottom. Mintage: 277,254,766 + 3,950,762 Proof. Mintage Years: 1964, 1964 Accented Hair Proof variety and 1964D. Engraver: Gilroy Roberts (Kennedy portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).

Note: Gilroy Roberts (March 11, 1905, Philadelphia – January 26, 1992) was a sculptor, gemstone carver, and the ninth Chief Engraver of the United States Mint between 1948 and 1964. He is notable for having designed the obverse of the Kennedy Half Dollar. The mintmark "D" is on the Reverse side, left of the stalk of the olive branch near the eagle's claw.

Difference between Normal Hair and Accented Hair.

 It is reported that 50% of 1964 coins have tail in B as shown above.

 
1965
 

KM#201 1 cent. Year: 1965. Weight: 3.04 g [3.11 g]. Metal: Bronze (95% Cu and 5% Zn or Tin). Diameter: 19.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Philadelphia, USA. Obverse: "IN GOD WE TRUST" motto at the top. Right facing profile of President Abraham Lincoln. "LIBERTY" written at the left side horizontally. Date at the chest of Abraham Lincoln. "V.D.B" written at 7 o'clock near the edge.
Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. "E·PLURIBUS·UNUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written above Lincoln Memorial building. Lincoln Memorial building in the center. "ONE CENT" written at the bottom. Mintage: 1,497,224,900. Mintage Years: [see under 1959]. Engraver: Victor David Brenner (Lincoln portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).
 
1966
 

KM#201 1 cent. Year: 1966. Weight: 3.07 g [3.11 g]. Metal: Bronze (95% Cu and 5% Zn or Tin). Diameter: 19.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Philadelphia, USA. Obverse: "IN GOD WE TRUST" motto at the top. Right facing profile of President Abraham Lincoln. "LIBERTY" written at the left side horizontally. Date at the chest of Abraham Lincoln. "V.D.B" written at 7 o'clock near the edge.
Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. "E·PLURIBUS·UNUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written above Lincoln Memorial building. Lincoln Memorial building in the center. "ONE CENT" written at the bottom. Mintage: 2,188,147,783. Mintage Years: [see under 1959]. Engraver: Victor David Brenner (Lincoln portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).

KM#202a Half Dollar (50 cents). Year: 1966. Weight: 11.44 g [12.50 g]. Metal: 0.400 Silver. Diameter: 30.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Philadelphia, USA. Obverse: "LIBERTY" written at the section. President John Fitzgerald Kennedy facing right in the center. Motto: "IN GOD WE TRUST" written besides his neck. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. State emblem (eagle with shield with "E PLURIBUS UNUM" on the banner) with ring of 50 stars in the center. One Dot on each side. Value "HALF DOLLAR" written at the bottom. Mintage: 108,984,932. Mintage Years: 1965, 1965SMS (Special Mint Set), 1966, 1966SMS, 1967, 1967SMS, 1968D, 1968S Proof, 1969D, 1969S Proof, 1970D Proof set only, and 1970S Proof. Engraver: Gilroy Roberts (Kennedy portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).

Note: Gilroy Roberts (March 11, 1905, Philadelphia – January 26, 1992) was a sculptor, gemstone carver, and the ninth Chief Engraver of the United States Mint between 1948 and 1964. He is notable for having designed the obverse of the Kennedy Half Dollar. The mintmark "D" is on the Obverse side, above the date near the neck point.

 
1966 - SMS (Special Mint Set)
Special Mint sets were produced by Philadelphia mint in 1965, 1966 and 1967.
 

KM#201 1 cent. Year: 1966-SMS. Weight: 3.11 g [3.11 g]. Metal: Bronze (95% Cu and 5% Zn or Tin). Mintage: 2,261,583.

KM#A192 5 cents (Nickel). Year: 1966-SMS. Weight: 5.00 g [5.00 g]. Metal: Copper-Nickel. Mintage: 2,261,583.

KM#195a Dime (10 cents). Year: 1966-SMS. Weight: 2.50 g [2.50 g]. Metal: Copper-nickel clad Copper. Mintage: 2,261,583.

KM#164a Quarter Dollar (25 cents). Year: 1966-SMS. Weight: 6.25 g [6.25 g]. Metal: Copper-nickel clad Copper. Mintage: 2,261,583.

KM#202a Half Dollar (50 cents). Year: 1966-SMS. Weight: 12.50 g [12.50 g]. Metal: 0.400 Silver. Mintage: 2,261,583.

 
1967
 

KM#201 1 cent. Year: 1967. Weight: 3.17 g [3.11 g]. Metal: Bronze (95% Cu and 5% Zn or Tin). Diameter: 19.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Philadelphia, USA. Obverse: "IN GOD WE TRUST" motto at the top. Right facing profile of President Abraham Lincoln. "LIBERTY" written at the left side horizontally. Date at the chest of Abraham Lincoln. "V.D.B" written at 7 o'clock near the edge.
Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. "E·PLURIBUS·UNUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written above Lincoln Memorial building. Lincoln Memorial building in the center. "ONE CENT" written at the bottom. Mintage: 3,048,667,100. Mintage Years: [see under 1959]. Engraver: Victor David Brenner (Lincoln portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).

KM#202a Half Dollar (50 cents). Year: 1967. Weight: 11.50 g [12.50 g]. Metal: 0.400 Silver. Diameter: 30.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Philadelphia, USA. Obverse: "LIBERTY" written at the section. President John Fitzgerald Kennedy facing right in the center. Motto: "IN GOD WE TRUST" written besides his neck. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. State emblem (eagle with shield with "E PLURIBUS UNUM" on the banner) with ring of 50 stars in the center. One Dot on each side. Value "HALF DOLLAR" written at the bottom. Mintage: 295,046,978. Mintage Years: 1965, 1965SMS (Special Mint Set), 1966, 1966SMS, 1967, 1967SMS, 1968D, 1968S Proof, 1969D, 1969S Proof, 1970D Proof set only, and 1970S Proof. Engraver: Gilroy Roberts (Kennedy portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).
 
1968
 

KM#201 1 cent. Year: 1968. Weight: 3.10 g [3.11 g]. Metal: Bronze (95% Cu and 5% Zn or Tin). Diameter: 19.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Philadelphia, USA. Obverse: "IN GOD WE TRUST" motto at the top. Right facing profile of President Abraham Lincoln. "LIBERTY" written at the left side horizontally. Date at the chest of Abraham Lincoln. "V.D.B" written at 7 o'clock near the edge.

My coin has damaged Motto due to much circulation.

Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. "E·PLURIBUS·UNUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written above Lincoln Memorial building. Lincoln Memorial building in the center. "ONE CENT" written at the bottom. Mintage: 1,707,880,970. Mintage Years: [see under 1959]. Engraver: Victor David Brenner (Lincoln portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).

KM#201 1 cent. Year: 1964D. Weight: 3.14 g [3.11 g]. Metal: Bronze (95% Cu and 5% Zn or Tin). Diameter: 19.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Denver, USA. Obverse: "IN GOD WE TRUST" motto at the top. Right facing profile of President Abraham Lincoln. "LIBERTY" written at the left side horizontally. Date at the chest of Abraham Lincoln. "V.D.B" written at 7 o'clock near the edge. "D" written below Date.
Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. "E·PLURIBUS·UNUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written above Lincoln Memorial building. Lincoln Memorial building in the center. "ONE CENT" written at the bottom. Mintage: 2,886,269,600. Mintage Years: [see under 1959]. Engraver: Victor David Brenner (Lincoln portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).

KM#201 1 cent. Year: 1964S. Weight: 3.07 g [3.11 g]. Metal: Bronze (95% Cu and 5% Zn or Tin). Diameter: 19.00 mm. Edge: Plain. Alignment: Coin. Mint: San Francisco, USA. Obverse: "IN GOD WE TRUST" motto at the top. Right facing profile of President Abraham Lincoln. "LIBERTY" written at the left side horizontally. Date at the chest of Abraham Lincoln. "V.D.B" written at 7 o'clock near the edge. "S" written below Date.
Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. "E·PLURIBUS·UNUM" (Latin for "Out of many, one") written above Lincoln Memorial building. Lincoln Memorial building in the center. "ONE CENT" written at the bottom. Mintage: 258,270,001 + 3,041,506 Proof. Mintage Years: [see under 1959]. Engraver: Victor David Brenner (Lincoln portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).

KM#202a Half Dollar (50 cents). Year: 1968D. Weight: 11.68 g [12.50 g]. Metal: 0.400 Silver. Diameter: 30.61 mm. Edge: Reeded. Alignment: Coin. Mint: Denver, USA. Obverse: "LIBERTY" written at the section. President John Fitzgerald Kennedy facing right in the center. Motto: "IN GOD WE TRUST" written besides his neck. Date at the bottom. Reverse: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" written at the top section. State emblem (eagle with shield with "E PLURIBUS UNUM" on the banner) with ring of 50 stars in the center. One Dot on each side. Value "HALF DOLLAR" written at the bottom. Mintage: 246,951,930. Mintage Years: 1965, 1965SMS (Special Mint Set), 1966, 1966SMS, 1967, 1967SMS, 1968D, 1968S Proof, 1969D, 1969S Proof, 1970D Proof set only, and 1970S Proof. Engraver: Gilroy Roberts (Kennedy portrait side) and Frank Gasparro (Value side).

Note: The mintmark "D" is on the Obverse side, above the date near the neck point.

 
 
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